35

Consider two classes A and B

class A
{
public:
    A(int);
    ~A();
};

class B : public A
{
public:
    B(int);
    ~B();
};


int main()
{
    A* aobj;
    B* bobj = new B(5);    
}

Now the class B inherits from A.

I want to create an object of B. I am aware that creating a derived class object, will also invoke the base class constructor , but that is the default constructor without any parameters.

What i want is that B to take a parameter (say 5), and pass it on to the constructor of A. Please show some code to demonstrate this concept.

2
  • 4
    B::B(int val) : A(val) {}
    – Andrew
    Commented May 16, 2013 at 11:11
  • 2
    I thought you want to make the destructor take arguments, didn't look like a typo to me. And no need from !!. Down-vote reverted, remark deleted. Commented May 16, 2013 at 11:21

4 Answers 4

52

Use base member initialisation:

class B : public A
{
public:
    B(int a) : A(a)
    {
    }
    ~B();
};
2
  • 2
    What if the definition of the constructor is in a different file?
    – Aurelius
    Commented Jul 22, 2020 at 21:27
  • @Bathsheba what if I want to pass different value in base class constructor ? for example in main.cpp B b1(3); constructor B gets called by passing value 3, the way you defined constructor, base class constructor A also gets called by passing value 3, yes we can change it while defining constructor of class B by replacing B(int a): A(a) via B(int a): A(k) k is the any constant we desire but it's while defining. I want to pass value for base constructor while calling only. Something like B b1(3):(4); might be this syntax is wrong but is there any way to do such thing Commented May 9, 2021 at 4:54
15
B::B(int x):A(x)
{
    //Body of B constructor
}
0
10

If you are using your derived class constructor just to pass arguments to base class then you can also do it in a shorter way in C++11:

class B : public A
{
    using A::A;
};

Note that I have not even used "public" access specifier before it. This is not required since inherited constructors are implicitly declared with same access level as in the base class.

For more details, please refer to section Inheriting constructors at: https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/using_declaration

Also you may refer to https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/a/307648 to understand limitations on constructor inheritance.

0

class A { public: int aval;

A(int a):aval(a){};
~A();

};

class B : public A { public: int bval;

B(int a,int b):bval(a),A(b){};
~B();

};

int main() {

  B *bobj = new bobj(5,6);
//or 
  A *aobj=new bobj(5,6); 

}

In this case you are assigning the values for base class and derived class .

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