2

I have a object in the frontend and I want to broadcast it to all connected clients. Can I send it as a mere object, the way I defined it? Or do I always have to stringyfy it as JSON object before sending?

my object:

var myBox = {
         x: 400,
         y: 700,
         w: 231,
         h: 199,
         c: "red",
         ....
         }

do I need stringify?

var myBox  = JSON.stringify({

            x: 400,
            y: 700,
            ...
        });

At the moment I send it like this and the msg is a JSON:

socket.emit('message', msg);
  • 1
    How are you "sending" it? – Explosion Pills May 16 '13 at 16:37
  • Who knows... you didn't give us nearly enough information to help you. – Brad May 16 '13 at 16:37
  • sorry I added some Infos. At the moment I send it like this: socket.emit('message', msg); – poppel May 16 '13 at 16:38
  • 1
    @poppel, Why not simply looking at the docs? socket.io/#how-to-use ... they have many examples where they pass objects as event's data. – plalx May 16 '13 at 16:50
7

You can pass the object to emit without stringifying it yourself. It will be sent as plaintext, but the client callback will be passed a parsed object.

In other words, doing this is fine:

var myBox = {     
    x: 400,
    y: 700,
    w: 231,
    h: 199,
    c: "red"
}

socket.emit('message', myBox);

When listening on the client, you don't need to worry about JSON.parse:

socket.on('message', function (data) {
    alert(data.x);
});
  • sorry I am a beginner, what do you mean by " the client callback will be passed a parsed object" ? – poppel May 16 '13 at 16:43
  • @poppel I've tried to explain it with a code snippet. – Asad Saeeduddin May 16 '13 at 16:45
  • cool thank you!!!! – poppel May 16 '13 at 17:11
2

Yes, to send an object you will need to serialize it to a string (or ArrayBuffer, to be exact) - some sequence of bits to go over the wire (under the hood of HTTP/WS).

Yet, that serialisation does not necessarily need to be JSON.stringify, it could be anything else as well.

From what I read in their docs, Socket.io has "automatic JSON encoding/decoding" so it will do call the JSON.stringify for you, accepting plain objects as arguments to .emit as well.

  • thanx, How would you then serialize the object above? – poppel May 16 '13 at 16:42
  • 1
    Although Bergi is correct that it doesn't have to be JSON... it really ought to be. JSON is a widely used notation for serializing objects with many libraries available for serializing and deserializing. No need to reinvent the wheel here. – Dancrumb May 16 '13 at 16:47
  • 1
    You can serialize to any format provided the receiving end knows how to deserialize it. If both sides are JavaScript, JSON really is the best option. – Brandon May 16 '13 at 16:52
  • @poppel: The object above? JSON. But there might be times where other formats are more appropriate, you only want to send plain strings or something. – Bergi May 16 '13 at 16:52
  • @Bergi, there are 2 contradictory answers... you are saying that you explicitely need to serialize the object while some others says that the serialization will automatically occur when passing an object. From what I can see on socket.io/#how-to-use, they are passing object references directly. – plalx May 16 '13 at 16:56
1

You can do a socket.emit with data from the object.

Like this:

socket.emit("message",{x:myBox.x,y:myBox.y, w:myBox.w, h:myBox.h, c:myBox.c});

or try:

socket.emit("message",myBox); //haven't tested it, but if it works, give plalx credit
  • Creating the object inline is completely unecessary and misleading. The way you are saying it suggests to the OP that the object needs to be defined inline, which is not the case. – plalx May 16 '13 at 16:49
  • It's not unnecessary or misleading. For the client-side receiving that info, if he wants to get the data attributes, it's as easy as: socket.on("message", function(data){console.log(data.x);console.log(data.y);console.log(data.w);}); Easy to understand this way. – Shazboticus S Shazbot May 16 '13 at 16:52
  • 1
    You are misunderstanding me. What I mean is that you can simply do socket.emit('message', myBox); There is no need for creating an inline object that replicates the structure of the first one. – plalx May 16 '13 at 16:53
  • I haven't tested it that way before, but you're probably right that it works. – Shazboticus S Shazbot May 16 '13 at 16:59

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.