3

I'm trying to read in a file with std::ifstream line by line in a loop. In the same loop, I'm trying to find two tags which enclose a block which I'd like to read as a whole.

I thought, I could track the start and end position of the block with seekg and after finding both positions use read(*,end-start) to read in the block.

However, tellg returns the stream position, but since the file has been opened in text mode [so that i'm able to call getline] and uses \r\n as line end, the parameter "number of characters" of the ifstream's-read-method refers to the number after conversion from \r\n to \n so that I'm reading exactly n characters more than I expected where n is the number of lines between the two tags.

Obviously, there are many workarounds, but I'm looking for a nice and intuitive solution. Any suggestions?

EDIT1@130507: My goal is to stay with the std lib streams and favor memory over speed, and I need to parse and process both parts, the surrounding part and the block between the tags.

I hoped that there's something available like switching to binary-mode in the already opened text-mode-stream, or having some (baseclass)raw-read-method which doesn't do the character translation like read or some mapper methods which allow to map between stream indizes before and after character translation but couldn't find anything so far.

Here's some code:

std::ifstream testDataFileStream;
testDataFileStream.open(testDataFileName, std::ios_base::in);
testDataFileStream.unsetf(std::ios::skipws); // No white space skipping
if (testDataFileStream) {
    std::string line;
    while (getline(testDataFileStream, line))
        if (line == "starttag")
            break;
    if (line == "starttag")
    {
        std::ifstream::pos_type cmdStartPos = testDataFileStream.tellg();
        std::ifstream::pos_type cmdEndPos;
        while (getline(testDataFileStream, line))
            if (line == "endtag")
                break;
            else
                cmdEndPos = testDataFileStream.tellg();
        if (line == "endtag")
        {
            std::streamsize nofBytesToRead = cmdEndPos - cmdStartPos;

            // now, one possible workaround follows, however, it's obviously quite lame
            testDataFileStream.close();
            testDataFileStream.open(testDataFileName, std::ios_base::in | std::ios::binary);
            testDataFileStream.seekg(cmdStartPos);
            std::string cmdsString;
            cmdsString.resize(nofBytesToRead+1);
            testDataFileStream.read(&cmdsString[0], nofBytesToRead);
        } else {}
    } else {}
    testDataFileStream.close();
} else {}

a testfile could look like the following:

some text
more text
starttag
much stuff on many lines
endtag
even more text
  • tellg & seekg get really tricky in text mode – Terenty Rezman May 16 '13 at 16:42
  • Text mode streams prefer relative positions instead of absolute. Doing seekg(tellg()) will displace your current stream's position to unknown location. It might look a bit inefficient, but I wonder what will happen if instead of: testDataFileStream.seekg(cmdStartPos); you do: while (testDataFileStream.tellg() != cmdStartPos) testDataFileStream.unget(); – Thanasis Papoutsidakis Sep 2 '13 at 10:59
1

Character translations occur when file is opened in text mode.

You can open the file in binary mode. ios::binary

  • Sorry that i didn't state clear enough that I need the outer part which isn't between the tags in text-mode, so i think doing all in binary would work as long as there's an easy method to translate the lines read in binary afterwards; are such functions available? – wonko realtime May 17 '13 at 7:12
1

As Jerry Coffin and Terenty Rezman suggest, the tellg()/seekg() approach takes you into the weeds. As you wish to parse all lines and to do some particular parsing on the starttag/endtag blocks, I suggest that you:-

  • Read the file in text mode line by line
  • Keep track of when you enter and leave those blocks
  • "Assemble" a block in some appropriate way while you are reading the lines within one.
  • Do whatever is right with each individual in-block and out-of-block line
  • Do whatever is right with a block whenever you complete one.
  • And handle parse errors as you go.

Here is a rough illustration. It skips empty lines but assumes there will be no padding, just tokens, in non-empty lines. It assumes the blocks cannot be nested:

#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>

enum parse_error
{
    none,
    open_fail,
    nested_starttag,
    orphan_endtag,
    orphan_starttag
};

void handle_out_of_block_line(std::string const & line) 
{
    std::cout << "Read out-of-block line: \"" << line << '\"' << std::endl;
}

void handle_in_block_line(std::string const & line, std::string & block) 
{
    std::cout << "Read in-block line: \"" << line << '\"' << std::endl;
    block += line + '\n'; 
}

void handle_block(std::string const & block)
{
    std::cout << "Got block {\n" << block << "}" << std::endl;
}

parse_error parse(std::string const & filename)
{
    std::ifstream ifs(filename);
    if (!ifs) {
        std::cerr << 
        "error: cannot open \"" << filename << "\" for reading" << std::endl; 
        return parse_error::open_fail;
    }
    bool in_block = 0;  
    std::string line;
    std::string block;
    while(getline(ifs,line),ifs) {
        if (line.empty()) {
            continue; // Skip empty line.
        }
        if (line == "starttag") {
            if (in_block) {
                std::cerr << "error: starttag within starttag" << std::endl; 
                return parse_error::nested_starttag;
            }
            in_block = true;
            block.clear();
        }
        if (in_block) {
            handle_in_block_line(line,block);
        } else {
            handle_out_of_block_line(line);
        }
        if (line == "endtag") {
            if (!in_block) {
                std::cerr << "error: ophan endtag" << std::endl; 
                return parse_error::orphan_endtag;
            }
            in_block = false;
            handle_block(block);
        }
    }
    if (in_block) {
        std::cerr << "error: ophan starttag" << std::endl;
        return parse_error::orphan_starttag;
    }
    return parse_error::none;
}

int main(int argc, char const *argv[])
{
    return parse(argv[1]);
}

Input e.g. a file containing this:

some text
more text
starttag
much stuff 
on many lines
endtag
even more text

and it outputs this:

Read out-of-block line: "some text"
Read out-of-block line: "more text"
Read in-block line: "starttag"
Read in-block line: "much stuff "
Read in-block line: "on many lines"
Read in-block line: "endtag"
Got block {
starttag
much stuff 
on many lines
endtag
}
Read out-of-block line: "even more text"
1

To expand on Jerry Coffin's approach here's a simple example. By using C++11's std::move extra allocations are avoided. Note however that getline() is going to cause repeated reallocation of its std::string argument, especially for long lines. If you really are concerned about memory management you should consider reading yor data into fixed size buffers.

Anyway, here's the code:

#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <utility>

int main() {
    std::ifstream testDataFileStream;
    testDataFileStream.open("data.txt", std::ios_base::in);
    testDataFileStream.unsetf(std::ios::skipws); // No white space skipping
    if (testDataFileStream) {
        std::vector<std::string> buffer;
        std::string line;
        bool found = false;
        while (getline(testDataFileStream, line)) {
            if (line == "starttag")
                found = true;
            if (found) {
                buffer.push_back(std::move(line));
                if (line == "endtag")
                    found = false;
            }
        }
        for (std::string & s : buffer) {
            std::cout << s << std::endl;
        }
    }
}
0

You seem (to me) to have picked a relatively difficult approach to the problem.

Since you're going to scan through the file looking for the tags anyway, why not retain the data as you scan for the tags? That is, scan and discard data until you find a start tag, then continue scanning and keep the data from there until you find the end tag.

  • Hi Jerry. I hoped that there's something more easy, like, say, switching to binary-mode in the already opened text-mode-stream, or having some (baseclass)raw-read-method which doesn't do the character translation like read or some mapper methods which allow to map between stream indizes before and after character translation. I like the simplicity of your approach, but don't like the reallocation overhead which comes when i'd use a stringstream or such to retain the lines. – wonko realtime May 17 '13 at 7:04
  • @wonkorealtime: Have you tested to find what the overhead from reallocation actually works out to? (I have -- it's generally too small to be measurable when you're also doing I/O). – Jerry Coffin May 17 '13 at 13:15

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