285

Is it possible to append to an empty data frame that doesn't contain any indices or columns?

I have tried to do this, but keep getting an empty dataframe at the end.

e.g.

import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame()
data = ['some kind of data here' --> I have checked the type already, and it is a dataframe]
df.append(data)

The result looks like this:

Empty DataFrame
Columns: []
Index: []
3
  • 1
    Answered a similar question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/13784192/…. basically something like this newDF = pd.DataFrame() #creates a new dataframe that's empty newDF = newDF.append(oldDF, ignore_index = True) # ignoring index is optional Feb 24, 2017 at 5:31
  • Append what? A single value? a Python list? a pandas Series? Another Dataframe? Your example trailing comment suggests you mean another dataframe - so give a dataframe in your example code, already :)
    – smci
    Aug 4, 2019 at 13:46
  • And when you say "The result looks like this", I hope you're not trying to directly do print(df.append(data)), because append() always returns None in Python
    – smci
    Aug 4, 2019 at 13:50

5 Answers 5

507

That should work:

>>> df = pd.DataFrame()
>>> data = pd.DataFrame({"A": range(3)})
>>> df.append(data)
   A
0  0
1  1
2  2

But the append doesn't happen in-place, so you'll have to store the output if you want it:

>>> df
Empty DataFrame
Columns: []
Index: []
>>> df = df.append(data)
>>> df
   A
0  0
1  1
2  2
11
  • 14
    Thank you! That worked! I didn't realize that I had to store the output... I probably should have read the documentation better, but I appreciate it, @DSM!
    – ericmjl
    May 16, 2013 at 21:06
  • 16
    i always forget you need to assign it!
    – Andy B
    Aug 4, 2014 at 19:07
  • 89
    actually that append doesn't happen in place is the most important info here ;)
    – refuzee
    Jun 30, 2015 at 16:32
  • 10
    No clue why Pandas examples don't show that. Thanks for your help! Jul 15, 2017 at 18:55
  • 5
    note that at least in june 2018 if you'd like the new rows to auto-index themselves, you should write df.append(data, ignore_index=True). Thanks for the great answer!
    – Adam B
    Jun 15, 2018 at 19:04
125

And if you want to add a row, you can use a dictionary:

df = pd.DataFrame()
df = df.append({'name': 'Zed', 'age': 9, 'height': 2}, ignore_index=True)

which gives you:

   age  height name
0    9       2  Zed
2
  • 1
    Low performace, specially when dealing with large data
    – raullalves
    Oct 7, 2018 at 2:57
  • 7
    Can you put that in relation to the other proposed alternatives, @raullalves?
    – Bouncner
    Jun 3, 2019 at 11:14
34

You can concat the data in this way:

InfoDF = pd.DataFrame()
tempDF = pd.DataFrame(rows,columns=['id','min_date'])

InfoDF = pd.concat([InfoDF,tempDF])
3
3

I tried this way and it works

import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame(columns =['columnA','columnB'])
data = {'columnA':'data', 'columnB':'data'}
df = df.append(data)
2

pandas.DataFrame.append Deprecated since version 1.4.0: Use concat() instead.

Therefore:

df = pd.DataFrame() # empty dataframe
df2 = pd..DataFrame(...) # some dataframe with data

df = pd.concat([df, df2])

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.