475

I have a data frame with two columns. First column contains categories such as "First", "Second", "Third", and the second column has numbers that represent the number of times I saw the specific groups from "Category".

For example:

Category     Frequency
First        10
First        15
First        5
Second       2
Third        14
Third        20
Second       3

I want to sort the data by Category and sum all the Frequencies:

Category     Frequency
First        30
Second       5
Third        34

How would I do this in R?

1
  • 4
    The fastest way in base R is rowsum.
    – Michael M
    Jan 4, 2019 at 18:58

17 Answers 17

484

Using aggregate:

aggregate(x$Frequency, by=list(Category=x$Category), FUN=sum)
  Category  x
1    First 30
2   Second  5
3    Third 34

In the example above, multiple dimensions can be specified in the list. Multiple aggregated metrics of the same data type can be incorporated via cbind:

aggregate(cbind(x$Frequency, x$Metric2, x$Metric3) ...

(embedding @thelatemail comment), aggregate has a formula interface too

aggregate(Frequency ~ Category, x, sum)

Or if you want to aggregate multiple columns, you could use the . notation (works for one column too)

aggregate(. ~ Category, x, sum)

or tapply:

tapply(x$Frequency, x$Category, FUN=sum)
 First Second  Third 
    30      5     34 

Using this data:

x <- data.frame(Category=factor(c("First", "First", "First", "Second",
                                      "Third", "Third", "Second")), 
                    Frequency=c(10,15,5,2,14,20,3))
3
  • 4
    @AndrewMcKinlay, R uses the tilde to define symbolic formulae, for statistics and other functions. It can be interpreted as "model Frequency by Category" or "Frequency depending on Category". Not all languages use a special operator to define a symbolic function, as done in R here. Perhaps with that "natural-language interpretation" of the tilde operator, it becomes more meaningful (and even intuitive). I personally find this symbolic formula representation better than some of the more verbose alternatives.
    – r2evans
    Dec 19, 2016 at 4:35
  • 1
    Being new to R (and asking the same sorts of questions as the OP), I would benefit from some more detail of the syntax behind each alternative. For instance, if I have a larger source table and want to subselect just two dimensions plus summed metrics, can I adapt any of these methods? Hard to tell. Oct 28, 2018 at 10:42
  • Is there anyway of maintaining an ID column? Say the categories are ordered and the ID column is 1:nrow(df), is it possible to keep the starting position of each category after aggregating? So the ID column would end up as, for example, 1, 3, 4, 7 after collapsing with aggregate. In my case I like aggregate because it works over many columns automatically.
    – QAsena
    Jun 24, 2020 at 20:32
373

You can also use the dplyr package for that purpose:

library(dplyr)
x %>% 
  group_by(Category) %>% 
  summarise(Frequency = sum(Frequency))

#Source: local data frame [3 x 2]
#
#  Category Frequency
#1    First        30
#2   Second         5
#3    Third        34

Or, for multiple summary columns (works with one column too):

x %>% 
  group_by(Category) %>% 
  summarise(across(everything(), sum))

Here are some more examples of how to summarise data by group using dplyr functions using the built-in dataset mtcars:

# several summary columns with arbitrary names
mtcars %>% 
  group_by(cyl, gear) %>%                            # multiple group columns
  summarise(max_hp = max(hp), mean_mpg = mean(mpg))  # multiple summary columns

# summarise all columns except grouping columns using "sum" 
mtcars %>% 
  group_by(cyl) %>% 
  summarise(across(everything(), sum))

# summarise all columns except grouping columns using "sum" and "mean"
mtcars %>% 
  group_by(cyl) %>% 
  summarise(across(everything(), list(mean = mean, sum = sum)))

# multiple grouping columns
mtcars %>% 
  group_by(cyl, gear) %>% 
  summarise(across(everything(), list(mean = mean, sum = sum)))

# summarise specific variables, not all
mtcars %>% 
  group_by(cyl, gear) %>% 
  summarise(across(c(qsec, mpg, wt), list(mean = mean, sum = sum)))

# summarise specific variables (numeric columns except grouping columns)
mtcars %>% 
  group_by(gear) %>% 
  summarise(across(where(is.numeric), list(mean = mean, sum = sum)))

For more information, including the %>% operator, see the introduction to dplyr.

5
  • 1
    How fast is it when compared to the data.table and aggregate alternatives presented in other answers?
    – asieira
    Jan 23, 2015 at 14:35
  • 10
    @asieira, Which is fastest and how big the difference (or if the difference is noticeable) is will always depend on your data size. Typically, for large data sets, for example some GB, data.table will most likely be fastest. On smaller data size, data.table and dplyr are often close, also depending on the number of groups. Both data,table and dplyr will be quite a lot faster than base functions, however (can well be 100-1000 times faster for some operations). Also see here
    – talat
    Jan 23, 2015 at 14:50
  • 1
    What does the "funs" refer to in the second example? Oct 8, 2019 at 19:02
  • 1
    @lauren.marietta you can specify the function(s) you want to apply as summary inside the funs() argument of summarise_all and its related functions (summarise_at, summarise_if)
    – talat
    Oct 9, 2019 at 11:52
  • In case, the column name has spaces. It might not work. Using back ticks would help. Ref. stackoverflow.com/questions/22842232/…
    – user131476
    Nov 2, 2020 at 7:57
86

The answer provided by rcs works and is simple. However, if you are handling larger datasets and need a performance boost there is a faster alternative:

library(data.table)
data = data.table(Category=c("First","First","First","Second","Third", "Third", "Second"), 
                  Frequency=c(10,15,5,2,14,20,3))
data[, sum(Frequency), by = Category]
#    Category V1
# 1:    First 30
# 2:   Second  5
# 3:    Third 34
system.time(data[, sum(Frequency), by = Category] )
# user    system   elapsed 
# 0.008     0.001     0.009 

Let's compare that to the same thing using data.frame and the above above:

data = data.frame(Category=c("First","First","First","Second","Third", "Third", "Second"),
                  Frequency=c(10,15,5,2,14,20,3))
system.time(aggregate(data$Frequency, by=list(Category=data$Category), FUN=sum))
# user    system   elapsed 
# 0.008     0.000     0.015 

And if you want to keep the column this is the syntax:

data[,list(Frequency=sum(Frequency)),by=Category]
#    Category Frequency
# 1:    First        30
# 2:   Second         5
# 3:    Third        34

The difference will become more noticeable with larger datasets, as the code below demonstrates:

data = data.table(Category=rep(c("First", "Second", "Third"), 100000),
                  Frequency=rnorm(100000))
system.time( data[,sum(Frequency),by=Category] )
# user    system   elapsed 
# 0.055     0.004     0.059 
data = data.frame(Category=rep(c("First", "Second", "Third"), 100000), 
                  Frequency=rnorm(100000))
system.time( aggregate(data$Frequency, by=list(Category=data$Category), FUN=sum) )
# user    system   elapsed 
# 0.287     0.010     0.296 

For multiple aggregations, you can combine lapply and .SD as follows

data[, lapply(.SD, sum), by = Category]
#    Category Frequency
# 1:    First        30
# 2:   Second         5
# 3:    Third        34
5
  • 14
    +1 But 0.296 vs 0.059 isn't particularly impressive. The data size needs to be much bigger than 300k rows, and with more than 3 groups, for data.table to shine. We'll try and support more than 2 billion rows soon for example, since some data.table users have 250GB of RAM and GNU R now supports length > 2^31.
    – Matt Dowle
    Sep 9, 2013 at 10:05
  • 2
    True. Turns out I don't have all that RAM though, and was simply trying to provide some evidence of data.table's superior performance. I'm sure the difference would be even larger with more data.
    – asieira
    Oct 23, 2013 at 23:22
  • 1
    I had 7 mil observations dplyr took .3 seconds and aggregate() took 22 seconds to complete the operation. I was going to post it on this topic and you beat me to it!
    – zazu
    Nov 14, 2015 at 19:10
  • 3
    There is a even shorter way to write this data[, sum(Frequency), by = Category]. You could use .N which substitutes the sum() function. data[, .N, by = Category]. Here is a useful cheatsheet: s3.amazonaws.com/assets.datacamp.com/img/blog/…
    – Stophface
    Feb 22, 2017 at 11:47
  • 4
    Using .N would be equivalent to sum(Frequency) only if all the values in the Frequency column were equal to 1, because .N counts the number of rows in each aggregated set (.SD). And that is not the case here.
    – asieira
    Mar 1, 2017 at 13:26
47

You can also use the by() function:

x2 <- by(x$Frequency, x$Category, sum)
do.call(rbind,as.list(x2))

Those other packages (plyr, reshape) have the benefit of returning a data.frame, but it's worth being familiar with by() since it's a base function.

0
37

Several years later, just to add another simple base R solution that isn't present here for some reason- xtabs

xtabs(Frequency ~ Category, df)
# Category
# First Second  Third 
#    30      5     34 

Or if you want a data.frame back

as.data.frame(xtabs(Frequency ~ Category, df))
#   Category Freq
# 1    First   30
# 2   Second    5
# 3    Third   34
34
library(plyr)
ddply(tbl, .(Category), summarise, sum = sum(Frequency))
29

If x is a dataframe with your data, then the following will do what you want:

require(reshape)
recast(x, Category ~ ., fun.aggregate=sum)
25

While I have recently become a convert to dplyr for most of these types of operations, the sqldf package is still really nice (and IMHO more readable) for some things.

Here is an example of how this question can be answered with sqldf

x <- data.frame(Category=factor(c("First", "First", "First", "Second",
                                  "Third", "Third", "Second")), 
                Frequency=c(10,15,5,2,14,20,3))

sqldf("select 
          Category
          ,sum(Frequency) as Frequency 
       from x 
       group by 
          Category")

##   Category Frequency
## 1    First        30
## 2   Second         5
## 3    Third        34
0
23

Just to add a third option:

require(doBy)
summaryBy(Frequency~Category, data=yourdataframe, FUN=sum)

EDIT: this is a very old answer. Now I would recommend the use of group_by and summarise from dplyr, as in @docendo answer.

15

Another solution that returns sums by groups in a matrix or a data frame and is short and fast:

rowsum(x$Frequency, x$Category)
1
  • 1
    Nicely, and indeed fast.
    – jay.sf
    May 1, 2020 at 23:28
9

I find ave very helpful (and efficient) when you need to apply different aggregation functions on different columns (and you must/want to stick on base R) :

e.g.

Given this input :

DF <-                
data.frame(Categ1=factor(c('A','A','B','B','A','B','A')),
           Categ2=factor(c('X','Y','X','X','X','Y','Y')),
           Samples=c(1,2,4,3,5,6,7),
           Freq=c(10,30,45,55,80,65,50))

> DF
  Categ1 Categ2 Samples Freq
1      A      X       1   10
2      A      Y       2   30
3      B      X       4   45
4      B      X       3   55
5      A      X       5   80
6      B      Y       6   65
7      A      Y       7   50

we want to group by Categ1 and Categ2 and compute the sum of Samples and mean of Freq.
Here's a possible solution using ave :

# create a copy of DF (only the grouping columns)
DF2 <- DF[,c('Categ1','Categ2')]

# add sum of Samples by Categ1,Categ2 to DF2 
# (ave repeats the sum of the group for each row in the same group)
DF2$GroupTotSamples <- ave(DF$Samples,DF2,FUN=sum)

# add mean of Freq by Categ1,Categ2 to DF2 
# (ave repeats the mean of the group for each row in the same group)
DF2$GroupAvgFreq <- ave(DF$Freq,DF2,FUN=mean)

# remove the duplicates (keep only one row for each group)
DF2 <- DF2[!duplicated(DF2),]

Result :

> DF2
  Categ1 Categ2 GroupTotSamples GroupAvgFreq
1      A      X               6           45
2      A      Y               9           40
3      B      X               7           50
6      B      Y               6           65
8

You could use the function group.sum from package Rfast.

Category <- Rfast::as_integer(Category,result.sort=FALSE) # convert character to numeric. R's as.numeric produce NAs.
result <- Rfast::group.sum(Frequency,Category)
names(result) <- Rfast::Sort(unique(Category)
# 30 5 34

Rfast has many group functions and group.sum is one of them.

8

Since dplyr 1.0.0, the across() function could be used:

df %>%
 group_by(Category) %>%
 summarise(across(Frequency, sum))

  Category Frequency
  <chr>        <int>
1 First           30
2 Second           5
3 Third           34

If interested in multiple variables:

df %>%
 group_by(Category) %>%
 summarise(across(c(Frequency, Frequency2), sum))

  Category Frequency Frequency2
  <chr>        <int>      <int>
1 First           30         55
2 Second           5         29
3 Third           34        190

And the selection of variables using select helpers:

df %>%
 group_by(Category) %>%
 summarise(across(starts_with("Freq"), sum))

  Category Frequency Frequency2 Frequency3
  <chr>        <int>      <int>      <dbl>
1 First           30         55        110
2 Second           5         29         58
3 Third           34        190        380

Sample data:

df <- read.table(text = "Category Frequency Frequency2 Frequency3
                 1    First        10         10         20
                 2    First        15         30         60
                 3    First         5         15         30
                 4   Second         2          8         16
                 5    Third        14         70        140
                 6    Third        20        120        240
                 7   Second         3         21         42",
                 header = TRUE,
                 stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
6

using cast instead of recast (note 'Frequency' is now 'value')

df  <- data.frame(Category = c("First","First","First","Second","Third","Third","Second")
                  , value = c(10,15,5,2,14,20,3))

install.packages("reshape")

result<-cast(df, Category ~ . ,fun.aggregate=sum)

to get:

Category (all)
First     30
Second    5
Third     34
2

You can use rowsum function to calculate the frequency.

data("mtcars")
df <- mtcars
df$cyl <- as.factor(df$cyl)

head looks as follows:

               wt    mpg    cyl
              <dbl> <dbl>   <fct>
Mazda RX4     2.620  21.0   6
Mazda RX4 Wag 2.875  21.0   6
Datsun 710    2.320  22.8   4

then,

rowsum(df$mpg, df$cyl) #values , group

4   293.3
6   138.2
8   211.4
1
library(tidyverse)

x <- data.frame(Category= c('First', 'First', 'First', 'Second', 'Third', 'Third', 'Second'), 
           Frequency = c(10, 15, 5, 2, 14, 20, 3))

count(x, Category, wt = Frequency)

1

A good way to sum a variable by group is

rowsum(numericToBeSummedUp, groups)

from base. Here only collapse::fsum and Rfast::group.sum have been faster.

Regarding speed and memory consumption

collapse::fsum(numericToBeSummedUp, groups)

was the best in the given example which could be speed up when using a grouped data frame.

GDF <- collapse::fgroup_by(DF, g) #Create a grouped data.frame with group g
#GDF <- collapse::gby(DF, g)      #Alternative

collapse::fsum(GDF)               #Calculate sum per group

Which comes close to the timings when the dataset was split in subdatasets per group.

A benchmark on different methods shows that for summing up a single column collapse::fsum was two times faster than Rfast::group.sum and 7 times faster than rowsum. They were followed by tapply, data.table, by and dplyr. xtabs and aggregate are the slowest.

Aggregating two columns collapse::fsum is again the fastest, 3 times faster than Rfast::group.sum and 5 times faster then rowsum. They are followed by data.table, tapply, by and dplyr. Again xtabs and aggregate are the slowest.


Benchmark

set.seed(42)
n <- 1e5
DF <- data.frame(g = as.factor(sample(letters, n, TRUE))
              , x = rnorm(n), y = rnorm(n) )

library(magrittr)

Some methods allow to do tasks which might help to speed up the aggregation.

DT <- data.table::as.data.table(DF)
data.table::setkey(DT, g)

DFG <- collapse::gby(DF, g)
DFG1 <- collapse::gby(DF[c("g", "x")], g)

# Optimized dataset for this aggregation task
# This will also consume time!
DFS <- lapply(split(DF[c("x", "y")], DF["g"]), as.matrix)
DFS1 <- lapply(split(DF["x"], DF["g"]), as.matrix)

Summing up one column.

bench::mark(check = FALSE
          , "aggregate" = aggregate(DF$x, DF["g"], sum)
          , "tapply" = tapply(DF$x, DF$g, sum)
          , "dplyr" = DF %>% dplyr::group_by(g) %>% dplyr::summarise(sum = sum(x))
          , "data.table" = data.table::as.data.table(DF)[, sum(x), by = g]
          , "data.table2" = DT[, sum(x), by = g]
          , "by" = by(DF$x, DF$g, sum)
          , "xtabs" = xtabs(x ~ g, DF)
          , "rowsum" = rowsum(DF$x, DF$g)
          , "Rfast" = Rfast::group.sum(DF$x, DF$g)
          , "base Split" = lapply(DFS1, colSums)
          , "base Split Rfast" = lapply(DFS1, Rfast::colsums)
          , "collapse"  = collapse::fsum(DF$x, DF$g)
          , "collapse2"  = collapse::fsum(DFG1)
)
#   expression            min   median `itr/sec` mem_alloc `gc/sec` n_itr  n_gc
#   <bch:expr>       <bch:tm> <bch:tm>     <dbl> <bch:byt>    <dbl> <int> <dbl>
# 1 aggregate         20.43ms  21.88ms      45.7   16.07MB    59.4     10    13
# 2 tapply             1.24ms   1.39ms     687.     1.53MB    30.1    228    10
# 3 dplyr              3.28ms   4.81ms     209.     2.42MB    13.1     96     6
# 4 data.table         1.59ms   2.47ms     410.     4.69MB    87.7    145    31
# 5 data.table2        1.52ms   1.93ms     514.     2.38MB    40.5    190    15
# 6 by                 2.15ms   2.31ms     396.     2.29MB    26.7    148    10
# 7 xtabs              7.78ms   8.91ms     111.    10.54MB    50.0     31    14
# 8 rowsum           951.36µs   1.07ms     830.     1.15MB    24.1    378    11
# 9 Rfast            431.06µs 434.53µs    2268.     2.74KB     0     1134     0
#10 base Split       213.42µs 219.66µs    4342.       256B    12.4   2105     6
#11 base Split Rfast  76.88µs  81.48µs   10923.    65.05KB    16.7   5232     8
#12 collapse         121.03µs 122.92µs    7965.       256B     2.01  3961     1
#13 collapse2         85.97µs  88.67µs   10749.       256B     4.03  5328     2

Summing up two columns

bench::mark(check = FALSE
          , "aggregate" = aggregate(DF[c("x", "y")], DF["g"], sum)
          , "tapply" = list2DF(lapply(DF[c("x", "y")], tapply, list(DF$g), sum))
          , "dplyr" = DF %>% dplyr::group_by(g) %>% dplyr::summarise(x = sum(x), y = sum(y))
          , "data.table" = data.table::as.data.table(DF)[,.(sum(x),sum(y)), by = g]
          , "data.table2" = DT[,.(sum(x),sum(y)), by = g]
          , "by" = lapply(DF[c("x", "y")], by, list(DF$g), sum)
          , "xtabs" = xtabs(cbind(x, y) ~ g, DF)
          , "rowsum" = rowsum(DF[c("x", "y")], DF$g)
          , "Rfast" = list2DF(lapply(DF[c("x", "y")], Rfast::group.sum, DF$g))
          , "base Split" = lapply(DFS, colSums)
          , "base Split Rfast" = lapply(DFS, Rfast::colsums)
          , "collapse" = collapse::fsum(DF[c("x", "y")], DF$g)
          , "collapse2" = collapse::fsum(DFG)
            )
#   expression            min   median `itr/sec` mem_alloc `gc/sec` n_itr  n_gc
#   <bch:expr>       <bch:tm> <bch:tm>     <dbl> <bch:byt>    <dbl> <int> <dbl>
# 1 aggregate         25.87ms  26.36ms      37.7   20.89MB   132.       4    14
# 2 tapply             2.65ms   3.23ms     312.     3.06MB    22.5     97     7
# 3 dplyr              4.27ms   6.02ms     164.     3.19MB    13.3     74     6
# 4 data.table         2.33ms   3.19ms     309.     4.72MB    57.0    114    21
# 5 data.table2        2.22ms   2.81ms     355.     2.41MB    19.8    161     9
# 6 by                 4.45ms   5.23ms     190.     4.59MB    22.5     59     7
# 7 xtabs             10.71ms  13.14ms      76.1    19.7MB   145.      11    21
# 8 rowsum             1.02ms   1.07ms     850.     1.15MB    23.8    393    11
# 9 Rfast            841.57µs 846.88µs    1150.     5.48KB     0      575     0
#10 base Split       360.24µs 368.28µs    2652.       256B     8.16  1300     4
#11 base Split Rfast 113.95µs 119.81µs    7540.    65.05KB    10.3   3661     5
#12 collapse         201.31µs 204.83µs    4724.       512B     2.01  2350     1
#13 collapse2        156.95µs 161.79µs    5408.       512B     2.02  2683     1
4
  • I bumped up n to 1e7 and re-ran the benchmark for the top performers. Mostly the same order, rowsum is unbeatable, with data.table2 in second and dplyr not far behind. On data that big, dplyr actually beats data.table with the class conversion in the benchmark. Jun 7 at 16:08
  • collapse::fsum is also fast, at least on larger data with more groups. set.seed(42); n <- 1e7; DF <- data.frame(g = as.factor(sample(1e4, n, TRUE)), x = rnorm(n), y = rnorm(n)); system.time(group.sum(DF$x, DF$g)); system.time(fsum(DF$x, DF$g))
    – Henrik
    Jun 7 at 20:32
  • For several variables: gr = GRP(DF, ~ g); fsum(DF, gr).
    – Henrik
    Jun 7 at 21:14
  • Thanks for the comment! I have added collapse::fsum which is currently the fastest.
    – GKi
    Jun 8 at 4:21

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.