I have string from JSON that sometimes looks like this @"2, 18, 27, 29" called mayString. Other times this string will just be @"2" (One number and no comma separation)

I want to test if the string contains the comma using the below code:

NSRange range = [mayString rangeOfString:@","];
        if (range.location != NSNotFound) {
            NSLog (@"Substring found at: %d", range.location);
        }

        else{

            NSLog (@"Substring not found");
        }

It works fine when the string does contain a comma separation but crashes when there isn't a comma I would expect the log to say "Substring not found"? But I get [__NSCFNumber rangeOfString:]: unrecognized selector sent to instance 0x1d533500

up vote 3 down vote accepted

try below code...as Marcin is right...

NSRange range = [[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@",mayString] rangeOfString:@","];
        if (range.location != NSNotFound) {
            NSLog (@"Substring found at: %d", range.location);
        }

        else{

            NSLog (@"Substring not found");
        }
  • Yep this worked thats a bit rubbish that JSON would do that I would have never figured it did that. I would expect if I declare and want a string I get a string not a number...but I am always learning. Cheers – Alex McPherson May 17 '13 at 13:13
  • ....cheers...also check @dasblinkenlight's answer..thats a clever approach... – BhushanVU May 17 '13 at 13:15

It looks like your "string" is actually an instance of NSNumber.

  • its defo a string (nonatomic, strong)NSString *mayString; – Alex McPherson May 17 '13 at 13:06
  • Your property may be defined as NSString, but when you convert your JSON data to Foundation objects, the string without commas is interpreted as a number. – Marcin Kuptel May 17 '13 at 13:07
  • +1 good one. need more explanation – Forgot May 17 '13 at 13:07
  • Ok so when I have multiple values like @"2, 3, 4, 5" this is interpreted as a string but single like this @"2" is being read as a number? – Alex McPherson May 17 '13 at 13:09
  • That is correct. I think you need to have a string like @"\"2\"" to make sure it is interpreted as a string and not a number. – Marcin Kuptel May 17 '13 at 13:10

Since JSON is untyped, the parser tries to figure out what's inside the string. When the string looks like a number, say, @"2", JSON gives you back an NSNumber object, not an NSString. You can assign it to NSString * variable, and Objective C compiler would not complain, but the value inside would remain NSNumber.

Here is how you can fix it:

id myObject = ... // Instead of MSString *myString

if ([myObject isKindOfClass:[NSNumber class]]) {
        NSLog (@"Object is not a string");
} else if ([myObject isKindOfClass:[NSString class]]) {
    NSRange range = [mayString rangeOfString:@","];
    if (range.location != NSNotFound) {
        NSLog (@"Substring found at: %d", range.location);
    } else{
        NSLog (@"Substring not found");
    }
}

You can also force it into a string, like this:

myString = [myString description]; // Not recommended

Even if myString was NSNumber before the assignment above, it will be an NSString after it, regardless of its initial type. However, keeping the original type is usually a better approach.

  • Surely not when the its declared as a string and looks like a string others the succesful find of the , would not be found other times no? – Alex McPherson May 17 '13 at 13:07
  • @AlexMcPherson What it's declared is of no interest to the compiler. Objective C is not a strongly typed language, you can assign a NSNumber to NSString, and the compiler would not care. JSON parser will return a string when the data does not look like a number. – dasblinkenlight May 17 '13 at 13:08
  • great thanks for the explanation thats cool! I upvoted you too. – Alex McPherson May 17 '13 at 13:19
  • I wouldn't rely on description method - it's format is undocumented and it's not guaranteed to return same values in future versions. [NSString stringWithFormat: @"%@", myString] should be used instead. – Mar0ux May 17 '13 at 13:29

If your value in JSON has just one number, NSJSONSerializer always converting it to NSNumber. So your NSString actually NSNumber. You can check it with isKindOfClass:

if([mayString isKindOfClass:[NSNumber class]) {
   // do something
}

EDIT: sorry duplicate answer, my skill of writing not so good

  • yep you guys are right I didnt know this thanks mate! – Alex McPherson May 17 '13 at 13:13

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