1

I know that for an integer, you can use:

int value;

I tried:

string str;

but Visual C++ gave me an error. How do I declare it without assigning a value, then using cin >> str later on to assign it?

  • 1
    Modify this question to include the actual error message - that information is the compiler trying to help you; at least give us that benefit too. – Clifford Nov 2 '09 at 20:50
14
#include <string>
int main()
{
 std::string str;
 return 0;
}

Check this info on Namespaces by MSDN

  • I can also write "using namespace std; string str;" right? I read it here while googling (cprogramming.com/tutorial/string.html) but I thought since I already wrote "using namespace std;" below the "#include <iostream>" I did not have to re-write it. – user149135 Nov 2 '09 at 12:44
  • Also, if you find you're using std::string in your code a lot, using std::string; will help. – Bill Nov 2 '09 at 12:45
  • 4
    In general it's recommended to not use using namespace std; but to just pull in the parts of the std namespace that you'll actually use: using std::string; using std::cout; using std::endl;, for instance. – Bill Nov 2 '09 at 12:46
  • Fabian, you are right of course, you don't have to rewrite it – henle Nov 2 '09 at 12:51
  • 1
    @Fabian, because it should be std::cout, std::cin – alexkr Nov 2 '09 at 13:19
1
#include <string>
using std::string;

int main() {
    string str;
    return 0;
}
0

Try the following:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using std::string;
using std::cout;
using std::cin;

int main()
{
  string str;
  cout << "Enter a string: ";
  cin >> str;
  cout << "You entered: " << str;

  return 0;
} 
  • What's the difference between iostring and iostream? – StackedCrooked Nov 3 '09 at 16:30
  • that'd be a typo. :P Thanks! – Bill Nov 3 '09 at 17:33

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