18

I'm trying to return the value of a checkbox to enable and disable a button. Making the checkbox is not a problem, the problem is the check box value always returns on. How should I get a value indicating if the checkbox is checked?

HTML:

<form>
    <input type="checkbox" id="checkbox" /> <label>Do you agree  </label><br />
    <input type="button" value="Continue" id="button" disabled="disabled" />
</form>  

Javascript:

$('#checkbox').change(function(){
    var checkboxValue = $(this).val();
    alert(checkboxValue);
});
3
48

Try using prop('checked');

var checkboxValue = $(this).prop('checked');
5
  • @gdoron, We're using jQuery. How is prop('checked') not valid and/or inferior? – Maxim Kumpan May 17 '13 at 14:42
  • 1
    @gdoron if you already have the jQuery framework loaded, why not use it? The overhead will be minimal and it will keep the code consistent in my opinion. Further, should you encounter a future browser that doens't support this.checked (for some bizzare reason), you could expect a framework update to handle this for you. All IMHO. – RemarkLima May 17 '13 at 14:44
  • 1
    @mkumpan, The same as why $('selector').each(function(){$(this).css('display', 'block');}) is bad, yes it does the job but you could have done it simply with $('selector').show() – gdoron is supporting Monica May 17 '13 at 14:44
  • @MohamedSamir, you probably misspelled checked or used it in a bad context. – gdoron is supporting Monica May 17 '13 at 14:46
  • 1
    @gdoron, let's not be mixing mice and elephants here. As RemarkLima mentioned, I was gunning for code consistency. The framework flexibility remark is also quite valid, albeit much less likely to fire. – Maxim Kumpan May 17 '13 at 14:53
8

It seems that you need checked

var checkboxValue = this.checked;
0
2

A couple of things is going on here

  1. the check box as is does not have a value
  2. you should be checking to see if its checked or not

try this

$('#checkBox').prop('checked');

if its checked you should get back true and false if its not checked.

1

Trying using (If you're using jQuery 1.6+):

var checkboxValue = $(this).prop('checked');

http://api.jquery.com/prop/

This should return a true or false correctly.

3
  • @gdoron if you already have the jQuery framework loaded, why not use it? The overhead will be minimal and it will keep the code consistent in my opinion. Further, should you encounter a future browser that doens't support this.checked (for some bizzare reason), you could expect a framework update to handle this for you. All IMHO. – RemarkLima May 17 '13 at 14:43
  • prop('checked') will use this.checked so if it doesn't work, so as jQuery. and how exactly writing more makes you code better? jquery shouldn't be replacing vanilla js. – gdoron is supporting Monica May 17 '13 at 14:47
  • 1
    @gdoron I disagree, but that's the joys of a free world right? Personally I'm of the opinion, if you're going to use a framework, use it as much as possible simply for consistency. A better method of this.checked could appear, and you then have to refactor all your code. Or just change the framework to suit. No? – RemarkLima May 17 '13 at 16:55
0

Or what about making use of the :checked Selector?

$(this).is(':checked') // returns true if checked and false otherwise
0

Try using is(':checked') instead of .val

$('#checkbox').change(function(){
    var checkboxValue = $(this).is(':checked');
    alert(checkboxValue);
});

It returns true or false

See also jQuery val() and checkboxes

0

Here is a code to do this, no jquery, based off of @gdoron's answer.

document.getElementById("checkbox").addEventListener("change", function() {
    if (this.checked) {
        //Whatever u want to do if checked
    }
    else {
        //Whatever u want to do if not checked
    }
})

Try checking/unchecking the checkbox in the below snippet to see this in action...

document.getElementById("checkbox").addEventListener("change", function() {
        if (this.checked) {
            //Whatever u want to do if checked
            alert("u check");
        }
        else {
            //Whatever u want to do if not checked
            alert("u uncheck");
        }
    })
<input type="checkbox" id="checkbox" />Coconuts?

2
  • The problem with your checkbox is that "value" returns whether or not the input is disabled/active/being used. To get what you want, you must use .checked or .prop('checked') instead. Both of these return true/false. I recommend using .checked, but use what is easiest for you. – Cannicide Feb 14 '17 at 23:39
  • Also by the way, for users who already have jquery loaded .prop('checked') is easiest as it is already included in jquery and fully cross-browser. .checked is just for those who don't want to use jquery... – Cannicide Feb 14 '17 at 23:45

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