13

Our application uses plenty of dictionaries which have multi level lookup that are not frequently changing. We are investigating at converting some of the critical code that does a lot of lookup using dictionaries to use alternate structures for - faster lookup, light on the memory/gc. This made us compare various dictionaries/libraries available -

Dictionary(System.Collections.Generics.Dictionary-SCGD), ImmutableDictionary, C5.HashDictionary, FSharpMap.

Running the following program with various items count - 100, 1000, 10000, 100000 - shows that Dictionary is still the winner at most ranges. First row indicates items in collection. MS/Ticks would the time taken to perform x lookups randomized (code is below).

Items - 100
SCGD - 0 MS - 50 Ticks
C5 - 1 MS - 1767 Ticks
Imm - 4 MS - 5951 Ticks
FS - 0 MS - 240 Ticks

Items - 1000
SCGD - 0 MS - 230 Ticks
C5 - 0 MS - 496 Ticks
Imm - 0 MS - 1046 Ticks
FS - 1 MS - 1870 Ticks

Items - 10000
SCGD - 3 MS - 4722 Ticks
C5 - 4 MS - 6370 Ticks
Imm - 9 MS - 13119 Ticks
FS - 15 MS - 22050 Ticks

Items - 100000
SCGD - 62 MS - 89276 Ticks
C5 - 72 MS - 103658 Ticks
Imm - 172 MS - 246247 Ticks
FS - 249 MS - 356176 Ticks

Does this mean, we are already using the fastest and don't have to change? I had presumed that immutable structures should be at the top of table, but it wasn't that way. Are we doing wrong comparison or am I missing something? Was holding on to this question, but felt, its better to ask. Any link or notes or any references that throws some light will be great.

Complete code for test -

namespace CollectionsTest
{
    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Collections.Immutable;
    using System.Diagnostics;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Text;
    using System.Runtime;
    using Microsoft.FSharp.Collections;

    /// <summary>
    /// 
    /// </summary>
    class Program
    {
        static Program()
        {
            ProfileOptimization.SetProfileRoot(@".\Jit");
            ProfileOptimization.StartProfile("Startup.Profile");
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Mains the specified args.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="args">The args.</param>
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // INIT TEST DATA ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

            foreach (int MAXITEMS in new int[] { 100, 1000, 10000, 100000 })
            {
                Console.WriteLine("\n# - {0}", MAXITEMS);

                List<string> accessIndex = new List<string>(MAXITEMS);
                List<KeyValuePair<string, object>> listofkvps = new List<KeyValuePair<string, object>>();
                List<Tuple<string, object>> listoftuples = new List<Tuple<string, object>>();
                for (int i = 0; i < MAXITEMS; i++)
                {
                    listoftuples.Add(new Tuple<string, object>(i.ToString(), i));
                    listofkvps.Add(new KeyValuePair<string, object>(i.ToString(), i));
                    accessIndex.Add(i.ToString());
                }

                // Randomize for lookups
                Random r = new Random(Environment.TickCount);
                List<string> randomIndexesList = new List<string>(MAXITEMS);
                while (accessIndex.Count > 0)
                {
                    int index = r.Next(accessIndex.Count);
                    string value = accessIndex[index];
                    accessIndex.RemoveAt(index);

                    randomIndexesList.Add(value);
                }

                // Convert to array for best perf
                string[] randomIndexes = randomIndexesList.ToArray();

                // LOAD ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                // IMMU
                ImmutableDictionary<string, object> idictionary = ImmutableDictionary.Create<string, object>(listofkvps);
                //Console.WriteLine(idictionary.Count);

                // SCGD
                Dictionary<string, object> dictionary = new Dictionary<string, object>();
                for (int i = 0; i < MAXITEMS; i++)
                {
                    dictionary.Add(i.ToString(), i);
                }
                //Console.WriteLine(dictionary.Count);

                // C5
                C5.HashDictionary<string, object> c5dictionary = new C5.HashDictionary<string, object>();
                for (int i = 0; i < MAXITEMS; i++)
                {
                    c5dictionary.Add(i.ToString(), i);
                }
                //Console.WriteLine(c5dictionary.Count);
                // how to change to readonly?

                // F#
                FSharpMap<string, object> fdictionary = new FSharpMap<string, object>(listoftuples);
                //Console.WriteLine(fdictionary.Count);

                // TEST ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
                for (int index = 0, indexMax = randomIndexes.Length; index < indexMax; index++)
                {
                    string i = randomIndexes[index];
                    object value;
                    dictionary.TryGetValue(i, out value);
                }
                sw.Stop();
                Console.WriteLine("SCGD - {0,10} MS - {1,10} Ticks", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds, sw.ElapsedTicks);

                Stopwatch c5sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
                for (int index = 0, indexMax = randomIndexes.Length; index < indexMax; index++)
                {
                    string key = randomIndexes[index];
                    object value;
                    c5dictionary.Find(ref key, out value);
                }
                c5sw.Stop();
                Console.WriteLine("C5   - {0,10} MS - {1,10} Ticks", c5sw.ElapsedMilliseconds, c5sw.ElapsedTicks);

                Stopwatch isw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
                for (int index = 0, indexMax = randomIndexes.Length; index < indexMax; index++)
                {
                    string i = randomIndexes[index];
                    object value;
                    idictionary.TryGetValue(i, out value);
                }
                isw.Stop();
                Console.WriteLine("Imm  - {0,10} MS - {1,10} Ticks", isw.ElapsedMilliseconds, isw.ElapsedTicks);


                Stopwatch fsw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
                for (int index = 0, indexMax = randomIndexes.Length; index < indexMax; index++)
                {
                    string i = randomIndexes[index];
                    fdictionary.TryFind(i);
                }
                fsw.Stop();
                Console.WriteLine("FS   - {0,10} MS - {1,10} Ticks", fsw.ElapsedMilliseconds, fsw.ElapsedTicks);
            }
        }
    }
}
11

The standard dictionary is already quite well optimized. All it really does when you do a lookup is calculate the hash of the provided key (the speed of which depends on the type of the key and how it implements GetHashCode), a modulo operation on the hash value to find the right bucket and then it iterates through the contents of the bucket until it finds the right value (the speed of which depends on the quality of the GetHashCode function, so if the buckets are well balanced and don't contain too many items, and the speed of the Equals method for the type).

All in all, it doesn't do that much for lookups, so I don't think you'll be able to find a significantly faster generic data structure. However, it's possible that depending on how you plan to use the dictionaries, you're able to build a more specialized solution. For example, I needed a really fast lookup where the key was a type. Instead of using a dictionary and doing dictionary[typeof(T)], I made a generic class like so:

class ValueStore<T> 
{
  public static T Value;
}

So I could just do ValueStore<T>.Value with pretty much zero lookup overhead.

Whether or not you could do something similar (and whether it's worth it) really depends on your usecase; how many items the structure would hold, how often it's being read and written to, whether it needs to be threadsafe, how important write speed is, etc. For example, if write speed didn't matter at all but if thread safety was required, you would need to do a copy-on-write, where the data structure is never written to but instead copied, ensuring thread safety and lockless (thus: fast) reads, at the cost of write speeds. Specializing it could go as far as reordering the structure on writes to optimize it so the hash buckets don't contain more than N items.

PS: if you were really desperate for speed but couldn't build a more specialized data structure then you could perhaps get small gains from copying Dictionary<TKey,TValue> and removing the various sanity checks (null checks and such) and virtual/interface method calls. However, I doubt this would give you any more than 20% gain, if that.

  • This is great information. Maybe you could also answer his question about FSharpMap vs Dictionary<TKey, TValue>? – N_A May 19 '13 at 19:08
  • @JulianR, great insights. Our dictionaries holds an average of 100-150 items, with very heavy reads and infrequent updates/writes, contains only basic types with no GetHashCode( ) overrides (completely dependent on .NET for these defaults). Dictionary<tk,tv> was the obvious choice then. With recent async/tpl support, we had to wrap the reads with locks to be thread safe and hence investigated if immutable structures will help optimize/avoid the locks. Considering the lookup cost in immutable libraries, dictionary still seems to be the winner at the moment. – sraj May 23 '13 at 18:58
  • 1
    @sraj - If you need thread safety and only have very infrequent writes and few keys, I would definitely look into copy-on-write instead of locks. Basically, whenever you modify the dictionary, don't add it to the original but make a copy and add it to the copy, then swap the copy and the original atomically. Example: stackoverflow.com/questions/10675400/… – JulianR May 23 '13 at 20:22
  • I love your ValueStore<T> idea. I hope I remember it next time I have a use case for it :-) – chris Jul 14 '15 at 9:54
  • Just a word of warning on the ValueStore<T> type - this is replicating the functionality of a singleton Dictionary<Type, T>. If you want multiple (different) instances of your Dictionary<Type, T>, then the ValueStore<T> solution isn't really going to work. – Philip C Jan 22 '16 at 8:27
11

Your presumption that immutable dictionaries allow faster lookup is wrong, because the way almost all immutable collections manage to avoid to copy the whole structure on 'modification' is by storing data in a tree and only copying some of the nodes on 'modification', sharing all other nodes. And tree access will generally be slower than accessing a flat array by index, as the mutable cousins do.

I compared the single-thread read performance of Dictionary<,>, ConcurrentDictionary<,>, and ImmutableDictionary<,> based on your code.

The average results of 30 runs, after warmup:

Read performance for various dictionary implementations

To get a feel for write performance, I also ran a test which adds 50 more entries to the dictionaries. Again, the average results of 30 runs, after warmup:

Write performance for various dictionary implementations

Tested on

  • .net 4.5.1
  • Microsoft Bcl Immutable 1.0.34.0

N.B. It should be noted that immutable dictionaries are so much faster and/or allow for higher levels of concurrency in many real life multi-threaded applications that otherwise would have to resort to slow or error-prone techniques like defensive copying, locking and the likes, in order to cope with mutability in the face of threads. This is especially true if you need snapshot-abilty such as for optimistic concurrency, MVCC.

Btw, if you run your sample code as is, the value for at least the immutable dictionary will be highly untypical in a normal (longer running) application, because for some reason the immutable dictionary apparently needs time to warm up. The difference in performance is enormous. Just have a look at the output of the first 3 runs:

Items    Dict   Conc   Immu
===========================
   100   1.90   1.00 361.81
  1000   1.07   1.00   4.33
 10000   1.24   1.00   1.74
100000   1.00   1.33   2.71
---------------------------
   100   1.06   1.00   2.56
  1000   1.03   1.00   4.34
 10000   1.00   1.06   3.54
100000   1.00   1.17   2.76
---------------------------
   100   1.06   1.00   2.50
  1000   1.66   1.00   4.16
 10000   1.00   1.02   3.67
100000   1.00   1.26   3.13

Your question was about read performance (of frozen dictionaries), but the tree characteristics of immutable collections show similarly in the write performance:

━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━
                       Mutable (amortized)  Mutable (worst)  Immutable 
───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────
 Stack.Push            O(1)                 O(n)             O(1)      
 Queue.Enqueue         O(1)                 O(n)             O(1)      
 List.Add              O(1)                 O(n)             O(log n)  
 HashSet.Add           O(1)                 O(n)             O(log n)  
 SortedSet.Add         O(log n)             O(n)             O(log n)  
 Dictionary.Add        O(1)                 O(n)             O(log n)  
 SortedDictionary.Add  O(log n)             O(n log n)       O(log n)  
━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━
  • Very nice round-up and comparison. It should be noted that you can improve ImmutableDictionary performance by using ImmutableDictionary.Builder, which improves adding large amounts of items and/or creating. Otherwise, adding one at a time needs to create a copy of (part of) the structure each time. It depends on your situation whether this is beneficial, of course: if you initialize with a large amount and only rarely add items, using the builder is the way to go. – Abel Jan 18 at 11:59
6

The F# map structure is implemented as a binary tree and, as such, is not actually a dictionary. As noted here, a standard .net dictionary is the fastest you're going to get.

  • 2
    Same with ImmutableDictionary<K,V>. It too is a binary tree so that you can efficiently mutate it without copying the entire dictionary. If you need superfast lookup times, the mutable Dictionary is the best way to go, and you can just expose it as a IReadOnlyDictionary to give it the readonly characteristics it sounds like you need. – Andrew Arnott Jun 25 '13 at 2:39
  • @AndrewArnott, yes, but read-only is not the same as immutable. The first means you can only read, but other consumers can mutate, thus dangerous in MT applications. The second means: guaranteed that the contents cannot be mutated by anyone, thus ideal in MT applications. – Abel Jan 18 at 12:01
0

Here's some more benchmarks.

.NET 4.5 version 1.3.1 of System.Collections.Immutable package, 64-bit.

Dictionary vs ImmutableDictionary:

BuilderBenchmark elapsed time
 Mutable   : Avg= 15.213, Stdev  4.591 [ms] (   10.2x)
 Immutable : Avg=155.883, Stdev 15.145 [ms]
BuilderBenchmark per op
 Mutable   : Avg=  0.152, Stdev  0.046 [us] (   10.2x)
 Immutable : Avg=  1.559, Stdev  0.151 [us]
SetItemBenchmark elapsed time
 Mutable   : Avg= 13.100, Stdev  2.975 [ms] (   30.4x)
 Immutable : Avg=397.932, Stdev 18.551 [ms]
SetItemBenchmark per op
 Mutable   : Avg=  0.131, Stdev  0.030 [us] (   30.4x)
 Immutable : Avg=  3.979, Stdev  0.186 [us]
LookupBenchmark elapsed time
 Mutable   : Avg=  9.439, Stdev  0.942 [ms] (    3.6x)
 Immutable : Avg= 34.250, Stdev  3.457 [ms]
LookupBenchmark per op
 Mutable   : Avg=  0.094, Stdev  0.009 [us] (    3.6x)
 Immutable : Avg=  0.343, Stdev  0.035 [us]

Dictionary vs ImmutableSortedDictionary:

BuilderBenchmark elapsed time
 Mutable   : Avg= 13.654, Stdev  5.124 [ms] (   34.5x)
 Immutable : Avg=471.574, Stdev 20.719 [ms]
BuilderBenchmark per op
 Mutable   : Avg=  0.137, Stdev  0.051 [us] (   34.5x)
 Immutable : Avg=  4.716, Stdev  0.207 [us]
SetItemBenchmark elapsed time
 Mutable   : Avg= 11.838, Stdev  0.530 [ms] (   37.6x)
 Immutable : Avg=444.964, Stdev 11.125 [ms]
SetItemBenchmark per op
 Mutable   : Avg=  0.118, Stdev  0.005 [us] (   37.6x)
 Immutable : Avg=  4.450, Stdev  0.111 [us]
LookupBenchmark elapsed time
 Mutable   : Avg=  9.354, Stdev  0.542 [ms] (    4.4x)
 Immutable : Avg= 40.988, Stdev  3.242 [ms]
LookupBenchmark per op
 Mutable   : Avg=  0.094, Stdev  0.005 [us] (    4.4x)
 Immutable : Avg=  0.410, Stdev  0.032 [us]

I wanted to know how much slower immutable collections would be. Note that the entire run is for 100,000 insert operations. I'm happy to report that the lookup performance degradation is only 4x while the insert performance degradation is 10x, still pretty decent. ImmutableDictionary is clearly superior to ImmutableSortedDictionary unless you absolutely need a sorted data structure.

Side note on copy on write behavior. These persistent data structures are several orders of magnitude faster than any naive copy on write implementation. Which was what I was using. It's also very easy to submit changes (with data race detection) using the compare and swap CAS instruction.

Attachments

Program.cs:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Collections.Immutable;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;

using ImmutableDictionary = System.Collections.Immutable.ImmutableDictionary; // select implementation to benchmark here

namespace DictPerf
{
    class Program
    {
        static string alphaNum = "0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";

        static string NextString(Random r, char[] buf)
        {
            int i = 0, len = r.Next(buf.Length) + 1;
            for (; i < len; i++)
            {
                buf[i] = alphaNum[r.Next(alphaNum.Length)];
            }
            return new string(buf, 0, len);
        }

        static HashSet<string> strings = new HashSet<string>();

        private static void Seed()
        {
            var r = new Random();
            var buf = new char[64];
            for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
            {
                strings.Add(NextString(r, buf));
            }
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Seed();

            Benchmark(RunDictionaryBuilderBenchmark, RunImmutableDictionaryBuilderBenchmark, "BuilderBenchmark");
            Benchmark(RunDictionarySetItemBenchmark, RunImmutableDictionarySetItemBenchmark, "SetItemBenchmark");
            Benchmark(RunDictionaryLookupBenchmark, RunImmutableDictionaryLookupBenchmark, "LookupBenchmark");
        }

        private static string Stats(IEnumerable<double> source)
        {
            var avg = source.Average();
            var variance = source.Select(val => (val - avg) * (val - avg)).Sum();
            var stdev = Math.Sqrt(variance / (source.Count() - 1));
            return $"Avg={avg,7:0.000}, Stdev{stdev,7:0.000}";
        }

        private static void Benchmark(Action<ICollection<string>, Stopwatch> benchmark1, Action<ICollection<string>, Stopwatch> benchmark2, string benchmarkName)
        {
            var xs = new List<double>();
            var ys = new List<double>();

            var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            {
                sw.Restart();
                benchmark1(strings, sw);
                xs.Add(sw.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);
                sw.Restart();
                benchmark2(strings, sw);
                ys.Add(sw.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);
            }

            var x = xs.Average();
            var y = ys.Average();
            var a = xs.Select(v => v / 100).Average();
            var b = ys.Select(v => v / 100).Average();

            Console.WriteLine($"{benchmarkName} elapsed time");
            Console.WriteLine($" Mutable   : {Stats(xs)} [ms] ({y / x,7:0.0}x)");
            Console.WriteLine($" Immutable : {Stats(ys)} [ms]");
            Console.WriteLine($"{benchmarkName} per op");
            Console.WriteLine($" Mutable   : {Stats(xs.Select(v => v / 100))} [us] ({b / a,7:0.0}x)");
            Console.WriteLine($" Immutable : {Stats(ys.Select(v => v / 100))} [us]");
        }

        private static void RunDictionaryBuilderBenchmark(ICollection<string> strings, Stopwatch sw)
        {
            var d = new Dictionary<string, object>();
            foreach (var s in strings)
            {
                d[s] = null;
            }
        }

        private static void RunImmutableDictionaryBuilderBenchmark(ICollection<string> strings, Stopwatch sw)
        {
            var d = ImmutableDictionary.CreateBuilder<string, object>();
            foreach (var s in strings)
            {
                d[s] = null;
            }
            d.ToImmutableDictionary();
        }

        private static void RunDictionarySetItemBenchmark(ICollection<string> strings, Stopwatch sw)
        {
            var d = new Dictionary<string, object>();
            foreach (var s in strings)
            {
                d[s] = null;
            }
        }

        private static void RunImmutableDictionarySetItemBenchmark(ICollection<string> strings, Stopwatch sw)
        {
            var d = ImmutableDictionary.Create<string, object>();
            foreach (var s in strings)
            {
                d = d.SetItem(s, null);
            }
        }

        private static void RunDictionaryLookupBenchmark(ICollection<string> strings, Stopwatch timer)
        {
            timer.Stop();

            var d = new Dictionary<string, object>();
            foreach (var s in strings)
            {
                d[s] = null;
            }

            timer.Start();

            foreach (var s in strings)
            {
                object v;
                d.TryGetValue(s, out v);
            }
        }

        private static void RunImmutableDictionaryLookupBenchmark(ICollection<string> strings, Stopwatch timer)
        {
            timer.Stop();

            var d = ImmutableDictionary.CreateBuilder<string, object>();
            foreach (var s in strings)
            {
                d[s] = null;
            }
            var x = d.ToImmutableDictionary();

            timer.Start();

            foreach (var s in strings)
            {
                object v;
                x.TryGetValue(s, out v);
            }
        }
    }
}

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