2

Every time I start a new actionscript class in Flash Builder it starts off the constructor with a line

super()

I have never seen this before, and it seems to have no purpose. Deleting it results in the exact same movie.

Why is it inserted into my new class and what does it do?

5
  • 1
    I know nothing about Flash, but I liked your question before you edited it :)
    – gkalpak
    May 17, 2013 at 18:43
  • Until someone more knowledgable answers, you can take a look here about super() in Java (see section 'Subclass Constructors'). I bet super() in Flash won't be too much different than that. (NOTE: I am not saying Java and Flash have anything in common (I wouldn't know anyway) - I am just referring to this supper() thing.)
    – gkalpak
    May 17, 2013 at 18:48
  • super() in ActionScript is exactly the same as it is in Java. Also, Java and ActionScript 3 have tons in common. You could compare and contrast them in the same way as you would with American and British English. May 18, 2013 at 8:58
  • There is a similar question here that also has some relevant info...
    – J. Holmes
    May 21, 2013 at 19:07
  • Why is this question not marked as solved after 9 Years??? @Fans
    – tatactic
    Sep 14, 2022 at 11:53

2 Answers 2

6

super() calls the constructor from the class that you're inheriting (extending).

If your inherited (base) class has no required parameters in it's constructor, you can omit it all together and flash will automatically call it before your constructor code.

You can call other functions (that are public or protected) from your base class by using the super keyword:

super.myBaseClassMethod(); //would call the method 'myBaseClassMethod' from your base class even if you had an overriden method with in this class

EXAMPLE:

package {
    public class BaseClass {
        public function BaseClass(){
            trace("Base Class Constructed");
        }

        public function someBaseMethod():void {
            trace("some method called from base");
        }
    }

}

package {
    public class MyClass extends BaseClass {  //this class is extending the class above
        public function MyClass():void {
            trace("My Class constructed");

            super();
            someBaseMethod();
            super.someBaseMethod();
        }

        override public function someBaseMethod():void {
            trace("Override");
        }
    }
}

So if you do this:

var tmp:MyClass = new MyClass();

You will get:

"My Class constructed"
"Base Class Constructed"

"override"
"some method called from base"

If you omit super(), it will be:

"Base Class Constructed"
"My Class constructed"

"override"
"some method called from base"
2

As a part of inheritance, super invokes the superclass or parent version of a method or constructor.

Invokes the superclass or parent version of a method or constructor. When used within the body of a class constructor, the super() statement invokes the superclass version of the constructor. The call to the superclass constructor must have the correct number of arguments. Note that the superclass constructor is always called, whether or not you call it explicitly. If you do not explicitly call it, a call with no arguments is automatically inserted before the first statement in the subclass constructor body. This means that if you define a constructor function in a subclass, and the superclass constructor takes one or more arguments, you must explicitly call the superclass constructor with the correct number of arguments or an error will occur. The call to the superclass constructor, however, does not need to be the first statement in your subclass constructor, as was required in ActionScript 2.0.

When used in the body of an instance method, super can be used with the dot (.) operator to invoke the superclass version of a method and can optionally pass arguments (arg1 ... argN) to the superclass method. This is useful for creating subclass methods that not only add additional behavior to superclass methods, but also invoke the superclass methods to perform their original behavior.

You cannot use the super statement in a static method.

In ActionScript, classes can extend other base classes not marked as final.

For example, MovieClip inheritance is as follows:

Sprite > DisplayObjectContainer > InteractiveObject > DisplayObject > EventDispatcher > Object

By invoking super(), you control when parent constructors are called.

package
{
    import flash.display.MovieClip;

    public class ExampleMovieClip extends MovieClip
    {
        public function ExampleMovieClip()
        {
            super(); // MovieClip's constructor is called
        }
    }
}

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