111

Is it possible to do something like this

max-width: calc(max(500px, 100% - 80px))

or

max-width: max(500px, calc(100% - 80px)))

in CSS?

  • Have you tried them out yourself? – Kyle G. May 17 '13 at 20:23
  • 3
    As @gert-sønderby said, just use these two: min-width:500px; width:calc(100% - 80px); – paulie4 Jul 12 '16 at 2:03
98

No you cannot. max() and min() have been dropped from CSS3 Values and Units. They may be re-introduced in CSS4 Values and Units however. There is currently no spec for them, and the calc() spec does not mention that either are valid inside a calc() function.

  • 1
    You can use JavaScript to get the computed style (actually the used style) of the element. Remove 80px from it and compare it to 500 to see which is greater. Something like var val = parseInt(window.getComputedStyle(el,null).getPropertyValue("width")) - 80 ) for getting the width - 80 and el.style.maxWidth for setting the max-width. – David Storey May 17 '13 at 20:48
  • 9
    Thank you. However, I would prefer a pure CSS solution. – Arnaud May 17 '13 at 21:10
  • 30
    Anytime there is a CSS question and a response begins with "You can use JavaScript", it's incorrect. There are many valid reasons for wanting to keep all presentation code in CSS. All-- not most. – b264 Aug 16 '17 at 22:39
  • 8
    It seems like min() and max() are back in CSS Values and Units Module Level 4 (Editor’s Draft, 1 September 2017) Link: drafts.csswg.org/css-values/#calc-notation – Jakob E Sep 25 '17 at 21:38
  • 3
    BUT there is a solution to the problem, keep scrolling to @andy answer below – Offirmo May 9 '18 at 22:34
103

A 'pure' css solution actually is possible now using media queries:

.yourselector {
  max-width: calc(100% - 80px);
}

@media screen and (max-width: 500px) {
  .yourselector {
    max-width: 500px;
  }
}
  • 2
    Great solution! I've used it actually for min height, apparently you may use media queries for max-height as well +1 – avishic Apr 26 '17 at 7:30
43

A workaround would be to use width itself.

max-width: 500px;
width: calc(100% - 80px);
  • 3
    This is a good idea, but if I understand @Arnaud's question correctly, he wants the max-width of either 500px or 100% - 80px. Your solution limits the max-width to 500px even if 100% - 80px is larger. – Theophilus Dec 1 '15 at 15:12
  • 2
    But it's the same as using min() therefore maybe helpful to others. – Seika85 Jan 19 '16 at 15:01
  • 16
    It seems to me that using min-width instead of max-width in the above example might be an equivalent to the asked-for behavior, though. – Gert Sønderby Feb 3 '16 at 14:53
  • 1
    Answer helped me add a margin to a flex container once the page width got small. codepen.io/OBS/pen/wGrRJV – ofer.sheffer Apr 5 '16 at 10:54
  • I posted a solution demonstrating @GertSønderby's comment is indeed the correct solution. – SherylHohman Apr 9 '19 at 15:08
11

While @david-mangold's answer above, was "close" it was incorrect.
(You can use his solution if you want a minimum width, instead of a maximum width).

This solution demonstrates that @gert-sønderby comment to that answer does work:
The answer should have used min-width, not max-width.

This is what it should have said:

min-width: 500px;
width: calc(100% - 80px);

Yes, use min-width plus width to emulate a max() function.

Here's the codepen (easier to see the demo on CodePen, and you can edit it for your own testing).

.parent600, .parent500, .parent400 {
    height: 80px;
    border: 1px solid lightgrey;
}
.parent600 {
    width: 600px;
}
.parent500 {
    width: 500px;
}
.parent400 {
    width: 400px;
}

.parent600 .child, .parent500 .child, .parent400 .child {
    min-width: 500px;
    width: calc(100% - 80px);
    border: 1px solid blue;
    height:60px;
}

.ruler600 {
    width: 600px;
    border: 1px solid green;
    background-color: lightgreen;
    height: 20px;
    margin-bottom: 40px;
}
.width500 {
    height: 20px;
    width: 500px;
    background-color: lightyellow;
    float: left;
}
.width80 {
    height: 20px;
    width: 80px;
    background-color: green;
    float: right;
}

.parent600 .wrong, .parent500 .wrong, .parent400 .wrong {
    max-width: 500px;
    width: calc(100% - 80px);
    border: 1px solid red;
    height:60px;
}
<h2>(Min) min-width correctly gives us the Larger dimension: </h2>
<div class="parent600">
    600px parent
    <div class="child">child is max(500px, 600px - 80px) = max(500px, 520px) = 520px</div>
</div>

<div class="ruler600"><div class="width500">500px</div>20<div class="width80">80px</div></div>

<div class="parent500">
    500px parent
    <div class="child">child is max(500px, 500px - 80px) = max(500px, 420px) = 500px</div>
</div>

<div class="ruler600"><div class="width500">500px</div><div class="width80">80px</div></div>

<div class="parent400">
    400px parent (child expands to width of 500px)
    <div class="child">child is max(500px, 400px - 80px) = max(500px, 320px) = 500px</div>
</div>
<div class="ruler600"><div class="width500">500px</div><div class="width80">80px</div></div>


<h2>(Max) max-width <em>incorrectly</em> gives us the Smaller dimension: </h2>
<div class="parent400">
    400px parent
    <div class="wrong">child is min(500px, 400px - 80px) = min(500px, 320px) = 320px</div>
</div>
<div class="ruler600"><div class="width500">500px</div><div class="width80">80px</div></div>

<div class="parent500">
    500px parent
    <div class="wrong">child is min(500px, 500px - 80px) = min(500px, 420px) = 420px</div>
</div>

<div class="ruler600"><div class="width500">500px</div><div class="width80">80px</div></div>

<div class="parent600">
    600px parent
    <div class="wrong">child is min(500px, 600px - 80px) = min(500px, 520px) = 500px</div>
</div>

<div class="ruler600"><div class="width500">500px</div>20<div class="width80">80px</div></div>

That said, @andy's answer above may be easier to reason about, and may be more appropriate in many use cases.

Also note, that eventually a max() and a min() function may be introduced to CSS, but as of April 2019 it is not part of the spec.

  • Why the downvote? Everything stated is correct, and all sources have been linked to and credited. – SherylHohman Jul 10 '19 at 16:18
1

@Amaud Is there an alternative in order to have the same result ?

There is a non-js pure css approach that would achieve similar results. You would need to adjust the parent elements container padding/margin.

.parent {
    padding: 0 50px 0 0;
    width: calc(50%-50px);
    background-color: #000;
}

.parent .child {
    max-width:100%;
    height:50px;
    background-color: #999;
}
<div class="parent">
  <div class="child"></div>
</div>

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