2

I want my textbox1.Text to countdown for 30 minutes. So far I have this:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Timer timeX = new Timer();
        timeX.Interval = 1800000;
        timeX.Tick += new EventHandler(timeX_Tick);
    }

    void timeX_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        // what do i put here?
    }
}

However I'm now stumped. I checked Google for answers but couldn't find one matching my question.

3
11

Here's a simple example similar to the code you posted:

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace StackOverflowCountDown
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            textBox1.Text = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(30).ToString();
        }

        private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e) { }

        private void textBox1_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e) { }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            var startTime = DateTime.Now;

            var timer = new Timer() { Interval = 1000 };

            timer.Tick += (obj, args) =>    
                textBox1.Text =
                    (TimeSpan.FromMinutes(30) - (DateTime.Now - startTime))
                    .ToString("hh\\:mm\\:ss");

            timer.Enabled = true;
        }
    }
}
1
  • 1
    This will result in "stutter seconds" because the timer may be called twice during the same second. The period must be at least < 500ms (half the period of what is being observed) when the absolute delta time is shown with such coarse precision. May 18 '13 at 23:35
3

Easiest thing you can do, is use a 1 minute timer:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace countdowntimer
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        private Timer timeX;
        private int minutesLeft;

        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            timeX = new Timer(){Interval = 60000};
            timeX.Tick += new EventHandler(timeX_Tick);
        }

        private void textBox1_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {



        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            minutesLeft=30;
            timeX.Start();
        }

        void timeX_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {

            if(minutesLeft--<=0)
            {
              timeX.Stop();
              // Done!
            }
            else
            {
              // Not done yet...
            }
            textBox1.Text = minutesLeft + " mins remaining";
        }

    }
}
2

If all you want to do is set the value of your Texbox to count down from 30 Minutes. You will first need to change your timer interval to something smaller than 30Minutes. Something like timeX.Interval = 1000; which will fire every second. then set up your event like so:

 int OrigTime = 1800;
 void timeX_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
 {
     OrigTime--;
     textBox1.Text = OrigTime/60 + ":" + ((OrigTime % 60) >= 10 ?  (OrigTime % 60).ToString() : "0" + OrigTime % 60);
 }

Also in your button click, you must add the following line: timeX.Enabled = true; In order to start the timer.

11
  • @JustWork Ah i see what you were saying added to the answer.
    – Nomad101
    May 18 '13 at 3:03
  • This method is prone to drifting and will be inaccurate if the computer enters sleep/suspend modes. It also relies on a known interval time. May 18 '13 at 3:08
  • 1
    -1: too much math that's hard to maintain, extra-long ternary operator that's hard to read, reinventing the wheel May 18 '13 at 3:12
  • 1
    @Nomad101 the things that get hard to maintain always start as innocent little line here and there. For example changing the duration won't be obvious after the code has been long forgotten. Also small delays/accelerations in event firing can build up error in your timer for long intervals, the output format is not immediately clear from your code - so, yes, it's a horrible piece of code May 18 '13 at 3:16
  • 1
    @Nomad101: I'm with Sten on this one. I very well can read the code, but it's not immediately obvious what it's trying to do. You'd do well to split your long assignment into 2 or 3 variables. As it is, I need to parse the code to understand, while if it were split up, it would be immediately obvious that this part calculates the minutes, that part the seconds and finally, all that gets formatted nicely
    – 3Doubloons
    May 18 '13 at 3:31
1

Your code will only get one event fired, once the 30 minutes has passed. In order to keep updating your UI continuously you'll have to make the events more frequent and add a condition inside the event handler to tell the count-down to stop once 30 minutes has passed.

You can do the time calculations easily by using TimeSpan and DateTime.

You'll also want to make sure your UI code runs on the UI thread, hence the Invoke.

  timeX.Interval = 500;

...


  TimeSpan timeSpan = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(30);
  DataTime startedAt = DateTime.Now;
  void timeX_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
  { 
       if ((DateTime.Now - startedAt)<timeSpan){
          Invoke(()=>{
             TimeSpan remaining = timeSpan - (DateTime.Now - startedAt);
             textBox.Text = remaining.ToString(); 
          });
       } else
          timeX.Stop();
  }
1
  • @user2246674 you're probably correct about Forms.Timer, just remove the Invoke if needed. Changed the interval to 500ms to prevent the stutter. May 18 '13 at 3:18
0

try this hope this will work for u

set timer interval=1000

minremain=1800000; //Should be in milisecond
timerplurg.satrt();

 private void timerplurg_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
       minremain = minremain - 1000;
        string Sec = string.Empty;
        string Min = string.Empty;
        if (minremain <= 0)
        {
            lblpurgingTimer.Text = "";
            timerplurg.Stop();
            return;
        }
        else
        {
            var timeSpan = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(Convert.ToDouble(minremain));

            var seconds = timeSpan.Seconds;
            var minutes = timeSpan.Minutes;
            if (seconds.ToString().Length.Equals(1))
            {
                Sec = "0" + seconds.ToString();
            }
            else
            {
                Sec = seconds.ToString();
            }
            if (minutes.ToString().Length.Equals(1))
            {
                Min = "0" + minutes.ToString();
            }
            else
            {
                Min = minutes.ToString();
            }
            string Totaltime = "Purge Remaing Time: " + Min + ":" + Sec;
            lblpurgingTimer.Text = Totaltime;
            }
         }

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.