2

So someone asked me to explain why the first scenario throws a compiler error and the 2nd scenario does not:

class Outer { 

  public Outer() {

    Inner i = new Inner();        

    class Inner {

    } 

  }

}

The other scenario is:

class Outer {

  public Boss() {
    Inner i = new Inner();
  }

  class Inner {
  }

}

I was successful in explaining that the first scenario throws a compiler error because you can't create an object of the class Inner before the class Inner gets pushed onto the stack. Feel free to elaborate on this or correct my understanding.

My main problem was not being able to explain why we can create an Inner object even though the the code for the class Inner comes after the constructor in the 2nd scenario. I feel like the best answer to this question would be to know where exactly inner classes are stored in memory. I'm hoping someone can provide a solid explanation. Thank you.

  • in first case,it doesn't know what is inner here,so it will give you the compilation error,while second case is not like that,when we call Boss only then it will create an instance of that class,so at that time,class Inner will be initiated.. – goodies May 18 '13 at 3:29
  • i think you try this class Outer { public Outer() { class Inner { } Inner i = new Inner(); } } – goodies May 18 '13 at 3:31
  • The constructor, in the second code, it should be Outer(), right? – acdcjunior May 18 '13 at 3:42
3

Nothing to do with stack, it's just the declaration order.

In this code:

class Outer { 
  public Outer() { // constructor "method" body BEGIN
    Inner i = new Inner();        
    class Inner {
    } 
  } // constructor "method" body END
}

As you are declaring Inner (a LOCAL class, not an inner class) in an ordinary block (that happens to be inside the constructor). This code is semantically equivalent to:

class Outer { 
  public Outer() {
    String fullName = firstName + " Smith";
    String firstName = "John";
  }
}

Which clearly does not work.

Update:

I see where confusion may arise. Hopefully this will clarify:

There are four types of inner classes, and where they can be declared:

  • Static member classes: declared as fields;
  • Member classes: declared as fiels as well;
  • Local classes: declared in blocks, as a statement (just like a variable declaration);
  • Anonymous classes: also declared in blocks, but are expressions.

Bottom line is: Once again, as a local class is a statement, it's just like a variable declaration, you cannot access its "products" before that statement is executed.

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