70

This question already has an answer here:

I want to stop execution for 2 seconds. So is this, but now follows a code block:

<html>
   <head>
      <title> HW 10.12 </title>
      <script type="text/javascript">
         for (var i = 1; i <= 5; i++) {
             document.write(i);
             sleep(2); //for the first time loop is excute and sleep for 2 seconds        
         };
      </script>
   </head>
   <body></body>
</html>

For the first time loop is excute and sleep for 2 seconds. I want to stop execution for two seconds?

marked as duplicate by JJJ, Danubian Sailor, Jesse, Benjamin Gruenbaum, Marc Audet May 18 '13 at 22:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

111

Javascript is single-threaded, so by nature there should not be a sleep function because sleeping will block the thread. setTimeout is a way to get around this by posting an event to the queue to be executed later without blocking the thread. But if you want a true sleep function, you can write something like this:

function sleep(miliseconds) {
   var currentTime = new Date().getTime();

   while (currentTime + miliseconds >= new Date().getTime()) {
   }
}

Note: The above code is NOT recommended.

  • 10
    DONT LIKE THAT!!! That causes WHOLE TAB freeze (also other tabs affected too) during that time , because while command is being executed unlimited times by CPU, causing to freeze. See practical example - jsfiddle.net/mn6yagqx (test yourself) – T.Todua Dec 20 '17 at 17:45
  • 13
    @T.Todua: That's why the post did not recommend it. This is just a workaround in case people want to do it anyway – Khanh TO Dec 23 '17 at 2:36
  • 1
    I wonder how many people have used this block of code already without looking at the comment of @T.Todua – Khan Shahrukh Jul 19 '18 at 12:57
  • 3
    This was useful to simulate a very busy Web Worker, so I could confirm how messages get queued and processed when the worker is busy. – whitehat101 Oct 7 '18 at 22:01
  • 1
    Still useful to introduce a temporary delay for debugging mocha tests, for example. – demisx Mar 3 at 17:36
52

There's no (safe) way to pause execution. You can, however, do something like this using setTimeout:

function writeNext(i)
{
    document.write(i);

    if(i == 5)
        return;

    setTimeout(function()
    {
        writeNext(i + 1);

    }, 2000);
}

writeNext(1);
  • 4
    Why document.write() it will screw up the DOM – Manu Viswam Nov 24 '14 at 9:09
  • 47
    @ManuViswam It's not my document.write, that's the code from the question. – James McLaughlin Nov 24 '14 at 9:42
21

You can use setTimeout to do this

function myFunction() {
    // your code to run after the timeout
}

// stop for sometime if needed
setTimeout(myFunction, 5000);
  • Why are you passing myFunction as a callback? – VSO Jul 5 '18 at 18:34
  • @VSO The syntax is incorrect. The setTimeout would need to be after the { before this would even work. – Jacksonkr Sep 27 '18 at 23:40
3

This Link might be helpful for you.

Every time I've wanted a sleep in the middle of my function, I refactored to use a setTimeout().

3

There's no way to stop execution of your code as you would do with a procedural language. You can instead make use of setTimeout and some trickery to get a parametrized timeout:

for (var i = 1; i <= 5; i++) {
    var tick = function(i) {
        return function() {
            console.log(i);
        }
    };
    setTimeout(tick(i), 500 * i);
}

Demo here: http://jsfiddle.net/hW7Ch/

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.