17

In Demystifying the Execve Shellcode is explained a way to write an execve shellcode:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>

unsigned char code[] = 
"\x31\xc0\x50\x68\x6e\x2f\x73\x68\x68\x2f\x2f\x62\x69\x89\xe3\x50\x89\xe2\x53\x89\xe1\xb0\x0b\xcd\x80";

main()
{

    printf("Shellcode Length: %d\n", strlen(code));

    int (*ret)() = (int(*)())code;

    ret();
}

What does the line int (*ret)() = (int(*)())code; do?

4
  • 2
    cdecl says: cast code into pointer to function returning int Commented May 18, 2013 at 17:23
  • i don't understand the () after ret and int()() before code.
    – user720694
    Commented May 18, 2013 at 17:33
  • 1
    To be able to parse such constructions in the head, go through clockwise/spiral rule: c-faq.com/decl/spiral.anderson.html
    – jwaliszko
    Commented May 18, 2013 at 17:50
  • 1
    Btw: this approach is disabled by default on W^X OSes. Running nop (0x90) on an 64-bit OS X on a modern processor, EXC_BAD_ACCESS because the kernel won't run any code from .bss, .text or the heap because these areas refert o PAE/long mode page table entries with bit 63 set (NX). It might work on a non-PAE/non-long-mode OS without something like PAX/ExecShield in something ancient, like DOS. Writing to code areas also won't work (self-mutating over a bunch of C inline asm nops). Better to make a program which spits out a minimal executable for the given platform(s) and run that.
    – user246672
    Commented Sep 26, 2015 at 0:30

4 Answers 4

18
  int (*ret)() = (int(*)())code;
  ~~~~~~~~~~~~   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        1              2

  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
               3
  1. It defines ret as a pointer to a function which has no parameter () and returns int. So, Those () indicates the definition of parameters of a function.

  2. It's for casting code to a pointer to a function which has no parameter () and returns int.

  3. Casts code as a function and assigns it to ret. After that you can call ret();.

 

unsigned char code[] =  "\x31\xc0\x50\x68\x6e\x2f\...

It is a sequence of machine instructions represented by hex values. It will be injected to the code as a function.

9
  • So, when ret() is called, how does the code actually "run", since i see do not seen C call that "loads" the shellcode and runs it?
    – user720694
    Commented May 18, 2013 at 17:45
  • @user85030, yes, "load" is called in ret(), google for "pointer to function" Commented May 18, 2013 at 17:47
  • The link you've provided is explaining it in 11 steps. That machine instruction sequence is doing everything as same as a call process needs.
    – masoud
    Commented May 18, 2013 at 17:49
  • Okay. So i read about function pointers and understood part 1). Can part 2) be written as (int* ())code instead of (int(*)())code? To rephrase my question, how is a variable casted into a function? (Since we have a function pointer on the left being assigned to the function on the right.
    – user720694
    Commented May 18, 2013 at 18:56
  • You can not use (int* ()) because it's not the way to declare pointer to function. Think about addresses, in C all objects have addresses, it just casts the address of code as the address of a function.
    – masoud
    Commented May 18, 2013 at 19:09
2
    (*(void(*)())shellcode)()

==

    p = (void(*)()) shellcode;
    (*p)();
1

Can this function pointer part be re-written in a simpler form?

I don't know if you think this is simpler, but maybe:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

unsigned char code[] = 
"\x31\xc0\x50\x68\x6e\x2f\x73\x68\x68\x2f\x2f\x62\x69\x89\xe3\x50\x89\xe2\x53\x89\xe1\xb0\x0b\xcd\x80";

typedef int(*shellcode_t)();

int main(int argc, char ** argv) {
    printf("Shellcode Length: %ld\n", strlen(code));

    shellcode_t ret = (shellcode_t)code;

    ret();
}
0

The int line declares the ret() function, by pointing to the code[] array; in other words, the function is mapped to the code[] binary instructions.

The \x construct is a safe way to embed hexadecimal characters in a string. You could for instance replace “\x31” by “1” as the character code of “1” is 49, or hexadecimal 31.

3
  • i don't understand the () after ret and int()() before code.
    – user720694
    Commented May 18, 2013 at 17:17
  • ret is a function pointer(en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Function_pointer) to a function with an undefined number of arguments(()) that returns a int. (int(*) () ) It's casting code function-address to make according to funtion-pointer address that take undefined number of arguments,that's how ret is declared.
    – Jack
    Commented May 18, 2013 at 17:35
  • Can this function pointer part be re-written in a simpler form?
    – user720694
    Commented May 18, 2013 at 19:03

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