I'm trying to vertically center a span or div element within another div element. However when I put vertical-align: middle, nothing happens. I've tried changing the display properties of both elements, and nothing seems to work.

This is what I'm currently doing in my webpage:

.main {
  height: 72px;
  vertical-align: middle;
  border: 1px solid black;
  padding: 2px;
}
    
.inner {
  vertical-align: middle;
  border: 1px solid red;    
}
    
.second {
  border: 1px solid blue; 
}
<div class="main">
  <div class="inner">
    This box should be centered in the larger box
    <div class="second">Another box in here</div>
  </div>
</div>

Here is a jsfiddle of the implementation showing that it doesn't work: http://jsfiddle.net/gZXWC/

  • 4
    if you want you might try display:table-cell; – Martin Turjak May 18 '13 at 22:30
  • 3
    In 2016, I'd recommend you to use flexbox – John Jan 6 '16 at 18:34
  • Removing the fixed height solved the problem for me. – plocks Aug 30 '16 at 13:40

14 Answers 14

up vote 150 down vote accepted

This seems to be the best way - some time has passed since my original post and this is what should be done now: http://jsfiddle.net/m3ykdyds/200

/* CSS file */

.main {
    display: table;
}

.inner {
    border: 1px solid #000000;
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
}

/* HTML File */
<div class="main">
    <div class="inner"> This </div>
</div>

You can also use the following:

Using CSS3:

<!-- HTML -->
<div class="wrapper">
   <div>Hi</div>
</div>

/* CSS */
.wrapper {
  display : flex;
  align-items : center;
}
  • 1
    So how does someone do what the OP wants to do? – Ryan Mortensen May 18 '13 at 22:30
  • 1
    downvoted -- This doesn't work at all. – Warren Rumak Jan 9 '15 at 19:53
  • 1
    Downvoted for not putting the bulk of the answer here. Don't use links. They die. – Jonathan M Jan 29 '15 at 22:20
  • 1
    @Joaquinglez are you using an up to date browser? You may need to use the browser specific extensions listed below if this is the case. – Charles Addis Feb 21 '16 at 6:32
  • 1
    @charles-addis I'm using Chrome 48.0.2564.109 and works display: -webkit-box – Joaquinglezsantos Feb 22 '16 at 8:15

Try this, works for me very well:

/* Internet Explorer 10 */
display:-ms-flexbox;
-ms-flex-pack:center;
-ms-flex-align:center;

/* Firefox */
display:-moz-box;
-moz-box-pack:center;
-moz-box-align:center;

/* Safari, Opera, and Chrome */
display:-webkit-box;
-webkit-box-pack:center;
-webkit-box-align:center;

/* W3C */
display:box;
box-pack:center;
box-align:center;
  • 6
    you saved my day :'( – Omar Tariq Nov 2 '13 at 9:26
  • 11
    This is the right answer. @Bogdan IE on the other hand, is the wrong answer. – Yuck Apr 2 '14 at 2:13
  • 4
    excellent answer, this has given me a fully working solution that hasn't caused other knock-on issues (an app using jquerymobile + phonegap and all the other solutions led to css & div sizing issues). Just to point out that these parameters have to be added to a CSS block specific to the elements to be centred/middled, eg: #element span {height:100%;display:-webkit-box;-webkit-box-pack:center;-webkit-box-align:center;} - note the height is important to ensure the span inherits the full height of its container (probably a div) otherwise you still won't get vertical centering! – Andy Lorenz May 2 '14 at 22:27
  • 2
    See @user1782556's answer for a more up-to-date, and, I think, cleaner and simpler answer. – Dan Nissenbaum Jun 24 '15 at 18:51
  • 1
    @BCoder: I'm glad that it saved your day :) – Mahendra Liya Sep 2 '16 at 6:39

Using CSS3:

<div class="outer">
   <div class="inner"/>
</div>

Css:

.outer {
  display : flex;
  align-items : center;
}

Note: This might not work in old IE's

  • 12
    This is supported by all major modern browsers and by the simplest and cleanest solution. – Sam Mar 18 '15 at 19:59
  • 2
    Also keep in mind inline-flex to have multiple elements in a row inside the inner element. – Dan Nissenbaum Jun 24 '15 at 19:08
  • Best answer to me, thanks =) – Elfayer Oct 31 '15 at 17:34
  • clean and smart answer . TY . – Abhay Kumar Jan 26 '16 at 23:29
  • 1
    In my case, since I wanted to center the content of .inner horizontally too, I had to add .inner { width: 100%; }. This way, it seems to work like .outer { display: table; } .inner { display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle; } but without forcing a minimum width. – Bart S Jun 23 '16 at 12:56

Setting the line-height to the same height as it's containing div will also work

DEMO http://jsfiddle.net/kevinPHPkevin/gZXWC/7/

.inner {
    line-height:72px;
    border: 1px solid #000000;
}
  • 1
    I posted a link that explained that method as well. Not my prefered method though, if the rest of the layout is not fixed in size - I have run into issues on different sized viewports with this method. – Charles Addis May 18 '13 at 22:36
  • 1
    yes the line-height technique works well, but ONLY IF you have single-line content. Additional lines will be lost / will spill outside the container and you'll need to start again! – Andy Lorenz May 2 '14 at 22:33
  • a) line-height will also change the height of the inner element. b) The inner element is still not accurately vertically centered. c) It does not work on elements that do not contain text, for ex: <img>, or elements with fixed height. – Alph.Dev Aug 9 '14 at 7:46
  • It can also fail cross-OS (Windows/Mac) due to font-rendering differences – LocalPCGuy Oct 27 '15 at 22:34
  • This is very unpredictable and often results in extra height on the container. – Undistraction Nov 18 '15 at 14:23

Places .child into .parent's center. Works when pixel sizes are unknown (in other words, always) and no problems with IE9+ too.

.parent { position: relative; }

.child {
    position: absolute;
    top : 50%;
    left: 50%;
    -ms-transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
    transform    : translate(-50%, -50%);    
}
<div class="parent" style="background:lightyellow; padding:6em"> 
  <div class="child" style="background:gold; padding:1em">&mdash;</div> 
</div>

You should put vertical-align: middle on the inner element, not the outer element. Set the line-height property on the outer element to match the height of the outer element. Then set display: inline-block and line-height: normal on the inner element. By doing this, the text on the inner element will wrap with a normal line-height. Works in Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and IE 8+

HTML

<div class="main">
    <div class="inner">Vertically centered text</div>
</div>

CSS

.main {
    height: 72px;
    line-height:72px;
}
.inner {
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
    line-height: normal;
}

Fiddle

  • This is probably the simplest way... all other answers on this page are unnecessarily clunky/hacky OR not supported in older browsers OR rely on knowing the height of the inner element. You don't actually need the line-height: normal; and display:inline; works too. The bonus of this method is it doesn't interfere with text-align:center;, which using display: table-cell; can create issues with. Quite often we want to align horizontally as well as vertically. See this edited fiddle: jsfiddle.net/br090prs/36 – mike-source May 14 '16 at 15:40
  • 1
    @mike-source the reason to use line-height: normal and display: inline-block is so that the inner text will wrap properly. If you're sure that the text in the inner div will never wrap then these properties won't be necessary. – Tim Perkins May 17 '16 at 20:10
  • Ever since Microsoft ended support for old versions of IE I have used flexbox for this sort of thing (as @user1782556 suggested). My original answer is the way to go if you still need to support IE 10 or older. – Tim Perkins May 17 '16 at 20:26
  • 100% agree, but I wouldn't personally go for flex box just yet, only 76% of browsers fully support it as of May 2016 (94% if you include partial support), see: caniuse.com/#search=flexible%20box. It is getting very close to being the most sensible option though, depending on your user base. – mike-source May 19 '16 at 15:51

I used this to align everything in the center of the wrapper div in case it helps anyone - I found it simplest:

div.wrapper {
  /* --- This works --- */
  display: flex;
  /* Align Vertically */
  align-items: center;
  /* Align Horizontally */
  justify-content: center;
  /* --- ---------- ----- */
  width: 100%;
  height:100px;
  background-color: blue;
}
div.inner {
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  background-color: orange;
}
<div class="wrapper">
  <div class="inner">
  </div>
</div>

HTML

<div id="myparent">
  <div id="mychild">Test Content here</div>
</div>

CSS

#myparent {
  display: table;
}
#mychild {
  display: table-cell;
  vertical-align: middle;
}

We set the parent div to display as a table and the child div to display as a table-cell. We can then use vertical-align on the child div and set its value to middle. Anything inside this child div will be vertically centered.

Here you have an example of two ways of doing a vertical alignment. I use them and they work pretty well. One is using absolute positioning and the other using flexbox.

Vertical Align Example

Using flexbox, you can align an element by itself inside another element with display: flex; using align-self. If you need to align it also horizontally, you can use align-items and justify-content in the container.

If you don't want to use flexbox, you can use the position property. If you make the container relative and the content absolute, the content will be able to move freely inside the container. So if you use top: 0; and left: 0; in the content, it will be positioned at the top left corner of the container.

Absolute positioning

Then, to align it, you just need to change the top and left references to 50%. This will position the content at the container center from the top left corner of the content.

Align in the middle of the container

So you need to correct this translating the content half its size to the left and top.

Absolute centered

here is a great article of how to vetical align.. I like the float way.

http://www.vanseodesign.com/css/vertical-centering/

The HTML:

<div id="main">
    <div id="floater"></div>
    <div id="inner">Content here</div>
</div>

And the corresponding style:

#main {
   height: 250px;
}

#floater {
   float: left;
   height: 50%;
   width: 100%;
   margin-bottom: -50px;
}

#inner {
   clear: both;
   height: 100px;
}
  • 3
    I think that if you define the height of the #inner block it invalidates the concept of proper vertical centering. The OPS was asking to make it automatic, so I would imagine that means the height of the inner box is not known at conception time. – Alexis Wilke Mar 12 '14 at 2:29

It's simple. Just add display:table-cell in your main class.

.main {
  height: 72px;
  vertical-align: middle;
  display:table-cell;
  border: 1px solid #000000;
}

Check out this jsfiddle!

Here is the latest simplest solution - no need to change anything, just add three lines of CSS rules to your container of the div where you wish to center at. I love Flex Box #LoveFlexBox

.main {
  /* I changed height to 200px to make it easy to see the alignment. */
  height: 200px;
  vertical-align: middle;
  border: 1px solid #000000;
  padding: 2px;
  
  /* Just add the following three rules to the container of which you want to center at. */
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
  justify-content: center;
  /* This is true vertical center, no math needed. */
}
.inner {
  border: 1px solid #000000;
}
.second {
  border: 1px solid #000000;
}
<div class="main">
  <div class="inner">This box should be centered in the larger box
    <div class="second">Another box in here</div>
  </div>
  <div class="inner">This box should be centered in the larger box
    <div class="second">Another box in here</div>
  </div>
</div>

Bonus

the justify-content value can be set to the following few options:

  • flex-start, which will align the child div to where the flex flow starts in its parent container. In this case, it will stay on top.

  • center, which will align the child div to the center of its parent container. This is really neat, because you don't need to add an additional div to wrap around all children to put the wrapper in a parent container to center the children. Because of that, this is the true vertical center (in the column flex-direction. similarly, if you change the flow-direction to row, it will become horizontally centered.

  • flex-end, which will align the child div to where the flex flow ends in its parent container. In this case, it will move to bottom.

  • space-between, which will spread all children from the beginning of the flow to the end of the flow. If the demo, I added another child div, to show they are spread out.

  • space-around, similar to space-between, but with half of the space in the beginning and end of the flow.

  • Perfect solution. The incompatible browsers can take the content unaligned and the user must deal with it or upgrade his/her browser. – twicejr Nov 28 '16 at 9:57

Since vertical-align works as expected on a td, you could put a single celled table in the div to align its content.

<div>
    <table style="width: 100%; height: 100%;"><tr><td style="vertical-align: middle; text-align: center">
        Aligned content here...
    </td></tr></table>
</div>

Clunky, but works as far as I can tell. It might not have the drawbacks of the other workarounds.

  • 3
    No, please, no tables anymore. CSS can do that in a clean way. There's no need to use <table> in this case. – enguerranws Nov 3 '14 at 10:29

Just put the content inside a table with height 100%, and set the height for the main div

<div style="height:80px;border: 1px solid #000000;">
<table style="height:100%">
<tr><td style="vertical-align: middle;">
  This paragraph should be centered in the larger box
</td></tr>
</table>
</div>

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