40

I found this program http://baiyunmanor.com/blog/work/get-current-date-time-in-dos-batch-file/

But I don't know what does the line

:: datetime.bat

at the end mean?

51

:: is a label (also, inaccurately, known in the wild by comment label) can be, in practice, considered a comment just as REM is, as it is an "un-goto-able" label.

There are some differences between REM and ::, though. The main ones are:

  • With ECHO ON a REM line is shown but not a line commented with ::
  • A :: can execute a line end caret (that is, a ^ at the end of a line starting with :: makes the next line also a comment):

    :: This is a comment^
    echo but watch out because this line is a comment too
    
  • Labels and :: have a special logic and can cause problems in parentheses blocks - take care when using them inside ( ). Example:

    for %%D in (hi) do (
        echo Before...
        :: My comment
        :: Some other comment
        echo After...
    )
    

    Outputs:

    Before ...
    The system cannot find the drive specified.
    After...
    
  • 7
    When you cite that :: "is also called comment label" you should include a link to the official source where you got that cite; otherwise you are contributing to spread popular beliefs that may be wrong. – Aacini Nov 7 '15 at 19:07
  • 1
    The most important difference is the special logic inside of parenthesis blocks. Would be great if you could add a resource for more information on that. – McK Jan 27 '16 at 9:18
  • 4
    The special handling in blocks is described at SO:goto command not working and more about SO:Which comment style should I use in batch files? – jeb Feb 10 '16 at 10:09
  • 2
    Wow, I used :: in a for loop and it took me a whole day to reach this post. The behavior of double colon in () in my case seemed undetermined. If it is just by itself in for(), it either crashes execution or says "...cannot find specified drive" (to that effect, different language) while "chdir" clearly showed my "cd" worked. – Sean Mar 17 '16 at 6:17
53

A line that start in double colon represent an invalid label that is ignored by the command processor, so it may be used to insert a comment. For reasons that can't be traced, many people use :: to insert comments in Batch files, but you must be aware that there are several pitfalls in its use that are described in the link given in Koterpillar's answer. It seems that the first use of :: instead of REM command was with the purpose to speed up the execution of Batch files in slow machines (ie: floppy disks), but that reason is not a valid justification for the use of double colon since many years ago.

Any line that contain an invalid label will be ignored by the command processor and you may use practically any special character to generate an invalid label. For example:

@echo off

:~ This is a comment
:` This is a comment
:! This is a comment
:@ This is a comment
:# This is a comment
:$ This is a comment
:% This is a comment
:^ This is a comment
:& This is a comment
:* This is a comment
:( This is a comment
:) This is a comment
:_ This is a comment
:- This is a comment
:+ This is a comment
:= This is a comment
:{ This is a comment
:} This is a comment
:[ This is a comment
:] This is a comment
:| This is a comment
:\ This is a comment
:: This is a comment
:; This is a comment
:" This is a comment
:' This is a comment
:< This is a comment
:> This is a comment
:, This is a comment
:. This is a comment
:? This is a comment
:/ This is a comment

echo OK

In other words: if you want to insert a comment and you want not to use REM command (although I can't think of any reason to do so), you have 32 possible character combinations to do so. Why you should use precisely this one: ::? Just because some old programs written 35 years ago did it?

  • 1
    At all you are right (as nearly always), but I can't see why you made this list? "~``!@#$%%*()_-{}[]\'.?/^&|<> are legal labels, only +=,;:<space> can't be used as labels. – jeb Oct 20 '15 at 9:29
  • 6
    Since you can't think of reasons I'll give you two: readability (the :: stands out as non-alphabetic in what's mostly alphabetic characters in a batch script ... and if you come from C++ where // is a single line comment, :: kinda makes sense for the same purpose) and saving space (if you've ever hit the upper size limit - somewhere beyond 60 kB - with a script you'll appreciate being able to save some bytes ... and yes, there are also good reasons for such big monolithic scripts). – 0xC0000022L Jan 20 '16 at 8:13
  • 1
    @0xC0000022L: It seems that you didn't read my post nor my comment. If you want readability and you come from C++, then :// makes much more sense to insert a single line comment! From this point of view, why don't use :' like in VBScript, or :# like in PowerShell and several other script languages, or :-- like in SQL, or :<-- like in HTML, etc... In other words: if you want to insert a comment and you have 32 possible character combinations to choose from, why you should use precisely this one: ::? The selection of :: have not reasonable=acceptable=logical reasons – Aacini Feb 8 '16 at 17:54
  • 3
    @Aacini: I did read it and it prompted me to comment. And out of your five alternatives all require more movement of my fingers than :: and even worse, three out of the five use more than two characters. Now while that's a logical explanation, I can't help with "reasonable" or "acceptable", because these are entirely subjective. But out of those alternatives :// would be the most acceptable to me, if I didn't also have the option to use ::. – 0xC0000022L Feb 9 '16 at 21:20
  • 1
    REM errors out on comments like REM /?a=1 ("1 was unexpected at this time.") whereas :: seems to handle them just fine. – genpfault Jan 2 '18 at 21:30
15

A line starting with a colon is a label which you can jump to with goto:

goto end
:end

A line starting with a double colon is a label, except you can't, even accidentally, jump to it:

goto :end REM this doesn't work
::end

Thus, double colon is used to comment lines out.

Source: http://www.robvanderwoude.com/comments.php

7

As mentioned by acdcjunior Labels and :: have a special logic and can cause problems in parenthesis blocks

Here are couple of samples

Sample 1

IF 1==1 (
  ::
)

Output of sample 1

) was unexpected at this time.

Sample 2

IF 1==1 (
  ::
  ::
)

Output of sample 2

The system cannot find the drive specified.
2

The colon (:) is a label marker and can be used for got instructions.

Some people use : as a comment too so a double colon is simply a stylistic REM statement

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