41

Say I've defined a function in PHP, and the last parameter is passed by reference. Is there any way I can make that optional? How can I tell if it's set?

I've never worked with pass-by-reference in PHP, so there may be a goofy mistake below, but here's an example:

$foo;
function bar($var1,&$reference)
{
    if(isset($reference)) do_stuff();
    else return FALSE;
}

bar("variable");//reference is not set
bar("variable",$foo);//reference is set
63

Taken from PHP official manual:

NULL can be used as default value, but it can not be passed from outside

<?php

function foo(&$a = NULL) {
    if ($a === NULL) {
        echo "NULL\n";
    } else {
        echo "$a\n";
    }
}

foo(); // "NULL"

foo($uninitialized_var); // "NULL"

$var = "hello world";
foo($var); // "hello world"

foo(5); // Produces an error

foo(NULL); // Produces an error

?>
3
  • 1
    Look at @Michal Lohniský comment. He has a good insight about the NULLs. Apr 27 '15 at 12:20
  • 2
    I know this is an old question, but for those who will see this answer in the future, foo(5) and foo(NULL) are throwing error because ONLY VARIABLES can be passed by reference ( 5 and NULL are not variables ) Jun 5 '19 at 16:59
  • One thing to beware of is that the caller could call the function with a variable that has the value null. For this reason, if the reference variable is purely used as an output variable, there's no need to check if it is null - doing so could cause unexpected behaviour if the variable contains null before calling the function.
    – Magnus
    Jul 5 '20 at 13:11
10

You can make argument optional by giving them a default value:

function bar($var1, &$reference = null)
{
    if($reference !== null) do_stuff();
    else return FALSE;
}

However please note that passing by reference is bad practice in general. If suddenly my value of $foo is changed I have to find out why that is only to find out that it is passed by reference. So please only use that when you have a valid use case (and trust me most aren't).

Also note that if $reference is supposed to be an object, you probably don't have to (and shouldn't) pass it by reference.

Also currently your function is returning different types of values. When The reference is passed it returns null and otherwise false.

9
  • I would upvote if it weren't for "[...] objects are passed by reference by default", which could use further clarification. blog.golemon.com/2007/01/youre-being-lied-to.html May 19 '13 at 16:24
  • 1
    @PleaseStand I am talking about how it is behaving in user land. I could start talking about ref counts etc, but I think that would only confuse OP
    – PeeHaa
    May 19 '13 at 16:25
  • I've edited your post to add a link to the PHP documentation on this, which doesn't mention "ref counts". Feel free to revert the change if you don't think it's clear enough. May 19 '13 at 16:34
  • @user1363115 If you really want to understand how it works I suggest you to watch this: blog.ircmaxell.com/2012/12/…
    – PeeHaa
    May 19 '13 at 16:46
  • 1
    Quote: However please note that passing by reference is bad practice in general. Would you say using preg_match() is bad practice in general?
    – hek2mgl
    May 19 '13 at 17:15
10

In reaction to @Martin Perry's post, you can distinguish between

foo(); // "NULL"

and

foo($uninitialized_var); // "NULL"

using func_num_args()

3

you can set default values

$foo;
function bar($var1,&$reference = false)
{
    if($reference != false) do_stuff();
     else return FALSE;
}

bar("variable");//reference is not set
bar("variable",$foo);//reference is set
1

try

use function bar($var1,&$reference=null)
{
    if(isset($reference)) do_stuff();
    else return FALSE;
}

if you pass value to &$reference it will take that value. or else null.

1

Two options:

Declare a default value, which is outside of the regular value range, for example -1

function bar($var1,&$reference = -1)
{
    if($reference !== -1) do_stuff();
    else return FALSE;
}

Do not declare the param and check func_get_args() to see if it was passed:

function bar($var1)
{
    if(count(func_get_args()) > 1) do_stuff();
    else return FALSE;
}

But note, the second approach will trigger a deprecated warning: Call-time pass-by-reference has been deprecated;

1

The following code snippet illustrates that a reference is just an alias for a variable name:

<?php
function set_variable(&$var, $val)
{
  $var = $val;
}

set_variable($b, 2);
echo $b; // 2
?>

This article by Larry Ullman explains the basics of passing variable by reference vs passing by value.

What's interesting is that at the end of Larry's article is a link to another article that goes in depth to explain the underpinnings of references and variables in PHP.

All in all, when making reference parameter optional by giving a default value, PHP 'creates' a new variable which holds the default value in case we do not provide a value for the optional parameter. But, in case we do provide one, we must provide a variable for which the reference parameter is but an alias.

0

Passing by reference is essential useful for assignments and sometimes you don't need to check if the value is null. This would allow indiscriminate assignment of values to variables including uninitialized ones.

function f(&$ref = null) {
    $ref = 1234;
}

f($x);
echo $x; // 1234
f(); // No error

Useful in codes like this:

if (doSomething($value, $errorMessage) === false) {
    logError($errorMessage);
}

doSomething($value); // Explicitly ignore error message

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