27

I want to check if a string is a number with this code. I must check that all the chars in the string are integer, but the while returns always isDigit = 1. I don't know why that if doesn't work.

char tmp[16];
scanf("%s", tmp);

int isDigit = 0;
int j=0;
while(j<strlen(tmp) && isDigit == 0){
  if(tmp[j] > 57 && tmp[j] < 48)
    isDigit = 0;
  else
    isDigit = 1;
  j++;
}
2
  • 9
    your range is wrong u want bigger than 57 and smaller than 48 .and it is impossible
    – qwr
    Commented May 20, 2013 at 7:52
  • 1
    The scanf() usage here is dangerous, as the input may overflow the tmp buffer.
    – jxh
    Commented Jul 23, 2015 at 0:25

19 Answers 19

47

Forget about ASCII code checks, use isdigit or isnumber (see man isnumber). The first function checks whether the character is 0–9, the second one also accepts various other number characters depending on the current locale.

There may even be better functions to do the check – the important lesson is that this is a bit more complex than it looks, because the precise definition of a “number string” depends on the particular locale and the string encoding.

3
  • +1. They might also want to consider - and . (depending on locale, of course)
    – Moo-Juice
    Commented May 20, 2013 at 7:54
  • 6
    isdigit and isnumber are very good functions. However, they are really bad if you want to learn exactly how to distinguish numbers from other characters. To learn the basics of a function, or more precie, how a function works, is more important than to learn how to use a function. To me this answer is correct but in no way helps the OP in the long run. He still doesn't know how to distinguish numbers in other languages that lack isdigit and isnumber. Just my 2 cents. Commented Jun 1, 2013 at 0:49
  • 1
    isnumber() is not standard C
    – Valerio
    Commented Apr 9, 2023 at 14:11
13
  if(tmp[j] >= '0' && tmp[j] <= '9') // should do the trick
8

More obvious and simple, thread safe example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    if (argc < 2){
        printf ("Dont' forget to pass arguments!\n");
        return(-1);
    }

    printf ("You have executed the program : %s\n", argv[0]);

    for(int i = 1; i < argc; i++){
        if(strcmp(argv[i],"--some_definite_parameter") == 0){
            printf("You have passed some definite parameter as an argument. And it is \"%s\".\n",argv[i]);
        }
        else if(strspn(argv[i], "0123456789") == strlen(argv[i])) {
            size_t big_digit = 0;
            sscanf(argv[i], "%zu%*c",&big_digit);
            printf("Your %d'nd argument contains only digits, and it is a number \"%zu\".\n",i,big_digit);
        }
        else if(strspn(argv[i], "0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz./") == strlen(argv[i]))
        {
            printf("%s - this string might contain digits, small letters and path symbols. It could be used for passing a file name or a path, for example.\n",argv[i]);
        }
        else if(strspn(argv[i], "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ") == strlen(argv[i]))
        {
            printf("The string \"%s\" contains only capital letters.\n",argv[i]);
        }
    }
}
6
  • 1
    Thanks, @Gerhardh. You are right. My fault - copy-paste mistake.
    – Dennis R
    Commented Oct 15, 2018 at 11:55
  • I loved this method of identifying numerical strings. Brillaint! Commented May 19, 2020 at 18:54
  • this approach does not work for "-1" nor for "".
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 10:46
  • @chqrlie How could "" be passed as an argument of CLI?
    – Dennis R
    Commented Oct 10, 2023 at 17:53
  • 1
    @DennisV: empty strings cannot be entered via scanf("%s",...) but not a problem as command line arguments: type ./myprogram "" '' at the shell prompt, both argv[1] and argv[2] will be empty strings.
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 10, 2023 at 19:08
4
#include "stdbool.h"
#include "stddef.h"
bool isNumber(char const* const text) {
    if (text == NULL || text[0] == '\0') {
        return false;
    }

    int dot_counter = 0;
    size_t length = 1;
    for (char character = text[1]; character != '\0';
         ++length, character = text[length]) {
        bool const is_valid_character =
            (character >= '0' && character <= '9') ||
            (character == '.' && ++dot_counter == 1);

        if (is_valid_character == false) {
            return false;
        }
    }

    char const first_character = text[0];
    bool is_character_sign = (first_character == '-' || first_character == '+');
    // verifications for first left character
    if ((is_character_sign || first_character == '.') && length == 1) {
        return false;
    }
    if (length == 2 && is_character_sign && text[1] == '.') {
        return false;
    }
    return (is_character_sign || first_character == '.') ||
           (first_character >= '0' && first_character <= '9');
}

#include <assert.h>
int main() {
    char tmp[16];
    assert(isNumber("a") == false);
    assert(isNumber("aa") == false);
    assert(isNumber("1"));
    assert(isNumber("11"));
    assert(isNumber("+1"));
    assert(isNumber("+1.") && +1. == 1.0);
    assert(isNumber("+.0") && +.0 == 0.0);
    assert(isNumber("-1"));
    assert(isNumber("-.0") && -.0 == -0.0);
    assert(isNumber("-1.") && -1. == -1.0);
    assert(isNumber("1.") && 1. == 1.0);
    assert(isNumber(".0") && .0 == 0.0);
    assert(isNumber(".") == false);
    assert(isNumber("-") == false);
    assert(isNumber("+") == false);
    assert(isNumber("+.") == false);
    assert(isNumber(".+") == false);
    assert(isNumber("-.") == false);
    assert(isNumber(".-") == false);
    assert(isNumber("") == false);
    assert(isNumber("1.1"));
    assert(isNumber("-1.1"));
    assert(isNumber("\0") == false);
    assert(isNumber(NULL) == false);

    return 0;
}

https://godbolt.org/z/YdnM6TKaz

5
  • Checking for '\n' and '\r' might be useful
    – Observer
    Commented Aug 4, 2021 at 17:12
  • some problems: isNumber("-1") should return true and isNumber("") should return false
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 10:43
  • More remarks: length and i should have type size_t but the down loop must be written more carefully. char character = text[length - 1]; has undefined behavior if length is 0.
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 20:49
  • 1
    @chqrlie, code improved.
    – Marcelo
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 21:04
  • Code seems to work but can be simplified substantially. see stackoverflow.com/a/77255444/4593267
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 21:46
4

In this part of your code:

if(tmp[j] > 57 && tmp[j] < 48)
  isDigit = 0;
else
  isDigit = 1;

Your if condition will always be false, resulting in isDigit always being set to 1. You are probably wanting:

if(tmp[j] > '9' || tmp[j] < '0')
  isDigit = 0;
else
  isDigit = 1;

But, this can be simplified to:

isDigit = isdigit(tmp[j]);

However, the logic of your loop seems kind of misguided:

int isDigit = 0;
int j=0;
while(j<strlen(tmp) && isDigit == 0){
  isDigit = isdigit(tmp[j]);
  j++;
}

As tmp is not a constant, it is uncertain whether the compiler will optimize the length calculation out of each iteration.

As @andlrc suggests in a comment, you can instead just check for digits, since the terminating NUL will fail the check anyway.

while (isdigit(tmp[j])) ++j;
2
  • for (char *ptmp = tmp; isdigit(*ptmp); ptmp++); might be nicer. Commented Jun 9, 2017 at 9:27
  • @andlrc: Yes, that is leveraging isdigit() returning false for '\0'.
    – jxh
    Commented Oct 28, 2019 at 5:32
3
if ( strlen(str) == strlen( itoa(atoi(str)) ) ) {
    //its an integer
}

As atoi converts string to number skipping letters other than digits, if there was no other than digits its string length has to be the same as the original. This solution is better than innumber() if the check is for integer.

4
  • Hi! Just came across your anwear, I'm learning C, so this might be dumb question, but I have a program where I malloc data into an array (char *array[4]; array[0] = (char*)malloc(10);). Then I read value into this allocated array position (scanf("%s", array[0]);) and then I try to use your code like this: (strlen(array[0]) == strlen( itoa(atoi(array[0])) )), however I get the following error: error: too few arguments to function 'itoa'. As I said before, I'm new to this stuff, so this might be obvious, but I have no idea how to fix it :/. Could you please exmplain this to me?
    – TDiblik
    Commented Mar 6, 2022 at 9:56
  • 1
    Alternatively, you can just use strcmp instead. Commented Mar 26, 2023 at 3:45
  • itoa() is not standard C, you can use printf() instead
    – Valerio
    Commented Apr 9, 2023 at 14:18
  • This approach dows not work for "a".
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 10:45
2

I need to do the same thing for a project I am currently working on. Here is how I solved things:

/* Prompt user for input */
printf("Enter a number: ");

/* Read user input */
char input[255]; //Of course, you can choose a different input size
fgets(input, sizeof(input), stdin);

/* Strip trailing newline */
size_t ln = strlen(input) - 1;
if( input[ln] == '\n' ) input[ln] = '\0';

/* Ensure that input is a number */
for( size_t i = 0; i < ln; i++){
    if( !isdigit(input[i]) ){
        fprintf(stderr, "%c is not a number. Try again.\n", input[i]);
        getInput(); //Assuming this is the name of the function you are using
        return;
    }
}
1
  • This approach does not detect an empty string, and rejects negative numbers.
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 10:47
1

None of these deal appropriately with negative numbers or floating point numbers.

How about:

bool
is_realnumber(char *instring) {
  if (*instring != '-' && *instring != '.' && !isdigit(*instring)) return false;
  if (strspn(instring+1, "0123456789.") < strlen(instring+1)) return false;
  int c = 0;
  while (*instring) if (*instring++ == '.') if (++c > 1) return false;
  return true;
}
1
  • some problems: is_realnumber("+1") should return true. is_realnumber("."), is_realnumber("-") and is_realnumber("-.") should return false
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 10:36
1

I can extend Marcelo's answer supporting floating numbers also as following:

char isnumber(const char *str)
{
     int decpos = -1, pmpos = -1, engpos = strlen(str) - 1, epmpos = strlen(str) - 1;
  for (int i = 0; i < strlen(str); i++)
    /* check if it is integer */
    if (str[i] > 47 && str[i] < 58)
      continue;
    /* check if it is decimal seperator and used once*/
    else if (str[i] == 46 && decpos == -1)
    {
      decpos = i;
      continue;
    }
    /* check if it is +/-, at the begining*/
    else if ((str[i] == 43 || str[i] == 45) && i == 0)
    {
      pmpos = 1;
      continue;
    }
    /* check if it is engineering format e/E, used once, after decimal and before +/-*/
    else if ((str[i] == 69 || str[i] == 101) && engpos == strlen(str) - 1 && i > 0 && i > decpos && i < epmpos)
    {
      engpos = 1;
      continue;
    }
    /* check if it is engineering format +/-, used once, after decimal and after engineering e/E*/
    else if ((str[i] == 43 || str[i] == 45) && epmpos == strlen(str) - 1 && i > 0 && i > decpos && i > engpos)
    {
      epmpos = 1;
      continue;
    }
    else
      return 0;
  return 1;
}
1

You can implement the function as following:

bool isNumeric(const char* s){
    while(*s){
        if(*s < '0' || *s > '9')
            return false;
        ++s;
    }
    return true;
}
3
  • 1
    You could also return bool for best practice.
    – Maf
    Commented Jul 20, 2022 at 17:27
  • 1
    @Maf you are right! Updated :) Commented Jul 20, 2022 at 20:45
  • There should be at least one digit: as posted isNumeric("") will return true incorrectly. Also isNumeric("-1") should return true but does not.
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 10:31
1

If you intend to use that number in integer/long form in the future, you will be calling atoi or atol anyway, in which case you might want to just check the return value.

char tmp[16];
scanf("%s", tmp); // unsafe!!!
long tmp_long = atol(&tmp);
if (tmp_long == 0){
    printf("%s: is not a number.\n", &tmp);
}

tutorialspoint on atol

1
  • 1
    wth this logic, "0" would not be considered a number.
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 10:29
0

Your condition says if X is greater than 57 AND smaller than 48. X cannot be both greater than 57 and smaller than 48 at the same time.

if(tmp[j] > 57 && tmp[j] < 48)

It should be if X is greater than 57 OR smaller than 48:

if(tmp[j] > 57 || tmp[j] < 48)
0

rewrite the whole function as below:

bool IsValidNumber(char * string)
{
   for(int i = 0; i < strlen( string ); i ++)
   {
      //ASCII value of 0 = 48, 9 = 57. So if value is outside of numeric range then fail
      //Checking for negative sign "-" could be added: ASCII value 45.
      if (string[i] < 48 || string[i] > 57)
         return FALSE;
   }

   return TRUE;
}
2
  • 3
    You should never use magic numbers in code. Especially if they are completely unnecessary. Instead of 48 use '0' etc.. Also calling strlen in each iteration of the loop is causing extra execution time. You should move that call before the loop.
    – Gerhardh
    Commented Sep 27, 2020 at 9:00
  • more problems: IsValidNumber("-1") should return true and IsValidNumber("") should return false
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 10:40
0

The problem is that the result of your code "isDigit" is reflecting only the last digit test. As far as I understand your qustion, you want to return isDigit = 0 whenever you have any character that is not a number in your string. Following your logic, you should code it like this:

char tmp[16];
scanf("%s", tmp);

int isDigit = 0;
int j=0;
isDigit = 1;  /* Initialised it here */
while(j<strlen(tmp) && isDigit == 0){
  if(tmp[j] > 57 || tmp[j] < 48) /* changed it to OR || */
    isDigit = 0;
  j++;
}

To get a more understandable code, I'd also change the test:

if(tmp[j] > 57 || tmp[j] < 48) 

to the following:

if(tmp[j] > '9' || tmp[j] < '0')
1
  • More problems to report: scanf("%s", tmp) -> scanf("%15s", tmp) and && isDigit == 0 -> && isDigit != 0
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 10:38
0

Can check every char by isdigit().

#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>

int is_digit_str(char* str){
    int digit_count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < strlen(str); i++) {
      if(isdigit(str[i]))
         digit_count++;
      else
         break;
    }

    return digit_count == strlen(str);
}
1
  • There should be at least one digit: as posted is_digit_str("") will return 1 incorrectly. Also is_digit_str("-1") should return 1 but does not.
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 10:30
0

Hi you could use this method, it uses the isdigit() function that you get from including the ctype.h library.

This piece of code checks if the return value of isdigit() is zero (it means that the character that we are analyzing is a non digit) if so, it increments j.

The logic is using the j variable as an "opcode": if not equal to zero it has been incremented hence, the function encountered a non digit char, otherwise every single char that is present in the string is a digit.

# include <stdio.h>
# include <ctype.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  int i = 0;
  int j = 0;
  char data[] = "1234t6789";
  int check;

  while(data[i] != '\0'){
    if((check = isdigit(data[i])) == 0)
      j++;
    i++;
  }

  if(j != 0)
    printf("The string doesn't contain just numbers.\n");
  else printf("The string contains only numbers.\n");
  
  return 0;
}
0

Here is a simple self contained function that verifies if a character string represents a number with an optional sign, at least one digit and an optional decimal point:

int isNumber(const char *str) {
    size_t index = 0;
    int has_digits = 0, has_dot = 0;
    char cc;

    // reject null pointer
    if (!str) {
        return 0;
    }
    // skip optional sign
    if (*str == '+' || *str == '-') {
        index++;
    }
    // scan the string
    while ((cc = str[index++]) != '\0') {
        if (cc == '.') {
            // accept a single decimal point
            if (has_dot++)
                return 0;
        } else
        if (cc >= '0' && cc <= '9') {
            // we have at least one digit
            has_digits = 1;
        } else {
            // reject all other characters
            return 0;
        }
    }
    // must have at least one digit
    return has_digits;
}
-1
int being_number(char string[]){
int l=strlen(string);
for (int i = 0; i < l; i++)
{
    if(string[i] >= '0' && string[i] <= '9'){
        i=i; 
    }
    else{
        return(0);
    }
}
return(1);    

}

2
  • 3
    i=i; ? Really? Surely you can think of something less wonky than that. Commented Jan 6, 2023 at 0:39
  • There should be at least one digit: as posted being_number("") will return true incorrectly. Also being_number("-1") should return 1.
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 10:28
-1

Here is the simplest possible answer:

bool isnumber(char string[]) {
    int len = strlen(string);
    int i = 0;
    while (i < len)
    {
            if (isdigit(string[i]) == 0)
                    return false;

            i++;
    }

    return true; }
5
  • 1
    You should cast the char argument to isdigit() as (unsigned char) to avoid undefined behavior on negative char values on platforms where char is a signed type.
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 10:22
  • You should accept an initial '+' or '-' sign.
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 10:23
  • i and len should have type size_t and the argument string should be defined as const char string[] or const char *string.
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 10:24
  • There should be at least one digit: as posted isnumber("") will return true incorrectly.
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 10:25
  • It's not the simplest possible answer. And it has no need to make two passes through the string. And you're passing possibly-signed char to a <ctype.h> function. Commented Oct 13, 2023 at 13:58

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