3

I am using C++ to create a string class. I want the class to only accept the data types char and wchar_t and I want the compiler to catch any invalid data types during compile time using #error. I do not like using assert( ). How can I do this?

2
  • I'm curious, what makes other types invalid?
    – GManNickG
    Nov 3 '09 at 1:51
  • 2
    Note that #error is used at preprocessing, you can't use it at compile time - thats why you need the mentioned static asserts. Nov 3 '09 at 2:29
12

You can use a static assert. Boost provides one.

Maybe something like:

#include <boost/type_traits.hpp>
#include <boost/static_assert.hpp>

template <typename T>
class my_string
{
public:
    // ...
private:
    BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT((boost::is_same<T, char>::value ||
                          boost::is_same<T, wchar_t>::value));
};

int main(void)
{
    my_string<char> chstr;
    my_string<wchar_t> wstr;

    // fails
    my_string<int> istr;
}

If you can't use Boost, you can easily remake static-assert and is_same:

// static assert failure
template <bool Predicate>
struct STATIC_ASSERT_FAILURE;

template <>
struct STATIC_ASSERT_FAILURE<true> {}; // only true is defined

// static assert test
template <unsigned TestResult>
struct static_assert {};

// static assert macro
#define STATIC_ASSERT(x) typedef static_assert< \
                          sizeof(STATIC_ASSERT_FAILURE<(x)>)> \
                          _static_assert_test_

// value is true if T and U are the same type
template <typename T, typename U>
struct is_same
{
    static const bool value = false;
};

template <typename T>
struct is_same<T, T>
{
    static const bool value = true;
};

template <typename T>
class my_string
{
public:
    // ...
private:
    STATIC_ASSERT((is_same<T, char>::value || is_same<T, wchar_t>::value));
};

int main(void)
{
    my_string<char> chstr;
    my_string<wchar_t> wstr;

    // fails
    my_string<int> istr;
}

Note, if you use a static assert in the same namespace twice, you'll get a name collision. You' have to use a more sophisticated version that uses a macro such as __COUNTER__ to generate unique names.

The above works in both GCC 4.4 and Visual Studio 2008.

1
  • 1
    Actually, I would recommend BOOST_MPL_ASSERT_MSG, since the compiler-issued message is then more readable. Nov 3 '09 at 8:44
5

You can play some tricks with specialization. First declare but don't define a template.

template <class C> class limiter;

Then specialize it for char and wchar_t and define some property.

template <>
class limiter<char>
{
public:
    typedef char limit_type;
}

template <>
class limiter<wchar_t>
{
public:
    typedef wchar_t limit_type;
}

In your string class, you can then reference:

template <class TYPE>
class mystring
{
   typedef typename limiter<TYPE>::limit_type limit_type;
   ...
}

Since that will only be valid for char and wchar_t, no other types will be instantiable.

3
  • Thanks! This what more of the solution I wanted! I tried using specialization before I posted, but couldn't figure out how to generate compiler errors! This is my solution: [code] template <typename T> struct string_type; template <> struct string_type<char> {}; template <> struct string_type<wchar_t> {}; template <typename T> class string : string_type<T> { ... };
    – Marlon
    Nov 3 '09 at 1:24
  • 1
    This is a specific implementation of static assert, honestly. You should prefer using a more general solution.
    – GManNickG
    Nov 3 '09 at 1:47
  • 1
    @GMan, sometimes general solution harder to understand rather than specific one. But your solution is better of course in general case. Nov 3 '09 at 5:44

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