17

I'm developing software for an ARM Cortex M3 (NXP LPC1769) microncontroller. At the moment I'm searching for a mechansim to detect if my function is called within an ISR. I asume that I have to check a register. Based on this information I would like to call difficult functions.

I already checked the reference manual, if there is a register containing the necessary information.

For example I tried to detect if I'm called from an ISR (I used SysTick-ISR) based on the "Interrupt Active Bit Register" (IABR) register. This register should be != 0 if an ISR is active. But the value was 0x00000000. This implies that no interrupt is active. Besides this test I checked the NVIC and SC register in the reference manual searching for a register containing the necessary flag but I didn't found one.

Does anybody know a suitable register / mechanism for my problem?

  • 2
    Why can't you simply have the ISR calling one function, and the rest of the program a different function? – Lundin May 21 '13 at 8:31
  • 1
    Yeah... you have to be very careful when doing this, especially with a tasker. Still, it's embedded, so good luck! – Martin James May 21 '13 at 18:49
  • 5
    @Lundin Perhaps to simplify an RTOS interface. For example Keil's RL-RTX has separate APIs for interrupt and thread contexts, for example os_evt_set and isr_evt_set; when writing reusable code, it may not always be possible to predict what contexts it might be used in in the future so you might create a generic evt_set wrapper, which can be used anywhere. Also the OS will behave incorrectly if the wrong API is accidentally called, so run-time selection is safer at the expense of a small overhead. – Clifford May 22 '13 at 17:32
27

You need to test the VECTACTIVE field of the Interrupt Control State Register.

I use the following:

//! Test if in interrupt mode
inline bool isInterrupt()
{
    return (SCB->ICSR & SCB_ICSR_VECTACTIVE_Msk) != 0 ;
}

SCM and SCB_ICSR_VECTACTIVE_Msk are defined in the CMSIS (core_cm3.h), which I imagine would be included indirectly by your part specific header (lpc17xx.h or similar I guess). I am using C++, including stdbool.h in C will get you a bool type, or change to an int or typedef of your own.

It is then used thus for example:

void somefunction( char ch )
{
    if( isInterrupt() )
    {
        // Do not block if ISR
        send( ch, NO_WAIT ) ;
    }
    else
    {
        send( ch, TIMEOUT ) ;
    }
}

If a solution is required that assumes no knowledge of the architecture consider the following:

volatile int interrupt_nest_count = 0 ;
#define ENTER_ISR() interrupt_nest_count++
#define EXIT_ISR()  interrupt_nest_count--
#define IN_ISR() (interrupt_nest_count != 0)

void isrA()
{
     ENTER_ISR() ;
     somefunction( 'a' ) ;
     EXIT_ISR() ;
}

void isrB()
{
     ENTER_ISR() ;
     somefunction( 'b' ) ;
     EXIT_ISR() ;
}

void somefunction( char ch )
{
    if( IN_ISR() )
    {
        // Do not block if ISR
        send( ch, NO_WAIT ) ;
    }
    else
    {
        send( ch, TIMEOUT ) ;
    }
}

However the question refers to safely detecting the interrupt context, and this relies on the enter/exit macros being added to all ISRs.

  • 1
    I would make 'interrupt_nest_count' volatile – Ibrahim Aug 20 '17 at 12:21
  • @Ibrahim : So would I; it only took 5 years for someone to notice! Thanks. Hopefully anyone to whom this is useful used the first method. – Clifford Aug 20 '17 at 14:12
  • C doesn't guarantee atomicity for i++ by default, even if i is volatile. – Groo Mar 13 '18 at 15:02
  • @Groo : Good point - an exercise for the reader. There may be good reasons for relying on implementation/architecture dependent behaviour rather the language defined behaviour. To minimise interrupt latency for example. It was a kernel on an idea. – Clifford Mar 13 '18 at 16:04
  • 2
    @Groo : I think I say as much in the answer. It was a long time ago - perhaps I would omit the second if answering today. – Clifford Mar 14 '18 at 12:08
14

After some discussion and more searching I found the right register: Interrupt Program Status Register: The IPSR contains the exception type number of the current Interrupt Service Routine (ISR). See the register summary in Table 626 for its attributes.

If a function isn't called from an isr the value of the register is IPSR == 0

  • That works too. ;) – Clifford May 21 '13 at 13:49
  • Yes, IPSR is the register I've used for this purpose in the past. – Dan Moulding May 21 '13 at 14:25
2

The simplest method is to pass the context as a parameter to the function. It is also platform independent.

typedef enum _context {
    normal_context = 0,
    isr_context = 1
} context;

Call to the function from ISR:

func(param1, param2, isr_context);

Call to the function from normal code:

func(param1, param2, normal_context);

If the ISR code is not under your control and you are just passing a function pointer, then just use two different wrapper functions. One that passes isr_context and another that passes normal_context as a parameter to the function.

  • 3
    I think the "simplest method" is in fact to interrogate the processor status. – Clifford May 21 '13 at 13:53
1

The best way is probably to make two different functions: one that is called from the ISR and another that is called from the rest of the program.

If that isn't an option, then you could determine the caller with pure standard C, no registers needed:

inline void my_func (const char* caller);

static void isr (void)
{
  my_func(__func__);
}


inline void my_func (const char* caller)
{
  if(strcmp(caller, "isr")==0)
  {
    // was called from isr
  }
  else
  {
    // called from elsewhere
  }
}

If you give your ISRs smart names, the above code will be quick enough to run from an isr.

  • 6
    The processor "knows" when it is an interrupt context. This is an unnecessary, inefficient and error prone method. – Clifford May 21 '13 at 13:52
  • That's one opinion, but it's a debatable one. Blindly calling the same code and expecting it to behave differently based on deep knowledge of the hardware details isn't the kind of practice everyone would consider proper either. It all depends on what you are trying to do and what concerns are paramount. It's also possible to imagine situations where code is in an interrupt context from the perspective of a scheduler, but no longer in one as far as the hardware is concerned. – Chris Stratton May 21 '13 at 14:08
  • 1
    @Clifford No, a processor does not know that. An ARM Cortex M3 knows that. It seems that the OP is writing some sort of library which is independent of the hardware. This code is portable. It is not inefficient, it can be optimized further into something that the compiler can evaluate at compile time and then discard. With some tiny modification, you can have the pre-processor output as if('i' == 'i' && 's' == 's' && 'r' == 'r' && '\0' == '\0'). Which of course any half-decent compiler will optimize away at compile time. How this would be error prone is beyond me, care to explain? – Lundin May 21 '13 at 14:39
  • 2
    @Lundin I beg to differ - the question is very specific about a Cortex M3 specific solution. Portability is better served by a hardware abstraction wrapper. I am wondering what hardware you might come across that has no means of determining an interrupt context. Error prone because it relies on the caller passing the correct information. – Clifford May 21 '13 at 20:05
  • 2
    @Lundin I'll leave it at that, you are starting to wear. Suffice it to say, IMO this is a rather inelegant solution to a simple problem. You have added a strcmp() to something that requires only a bit test - and in an ISR that might be critical. – Clifford May 22 '13 at 15:02

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