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I'm developing an easy website and I'm trying a sqlite database. In contrast to MySQL, when you connect to a db you don't say and user/password, and with MySQL you do.

So, anybody can access it. Isn't it a security hole to keep sensitive information?

And even hiding your db.sqlite, it shouldn't be that hard to query this db from a third-party program/web to get information.

Thanks for your time.

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  • 1
    It is, after all, designed to be a lightweight database, without the bloat and/or convenience of full-scale solutions - hence the "lite" in "SQLite". Commented Mar 27, 2014 at 11:01

4 Answers 4

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sqlite relies on file permissions to secure the data, as you've mentioned it doesn't require a login. From IBM

SQLite has no concept of user accounts, and instead relies on the file system for all database permissions. This makes enforcing storage quotas difficult and enforcing user permissions impossible.

The way you secure your database is to set file permissions so that only specific users can access the data. If you're running a web site on Linux, you can set these using chmod. Typically, you set the web server to run under its own user, such as www-data, and then restrict access to the sqlite file to only that user. For example:

chown www-data database.db    # set ownership of the database.db file.
chmod 600 database.db         # allow only read-write by the owner.

This prevents third party programs or any external parties from reading the database by leveraging the file system security.

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  • There is one thing one can do to enhance the security a little bit, use one of the encryption extensions for SQLite. But thats about it.
    – schlenk
    Commented May 20, 2013 at 22:51
  • Could you elaborate on "Typically, you set the web server to run under its own user and then restrict access to the sqlite file to only that user.", please?
    – T.Woody
    Commented Jun 7, 2019 at 19:58
  • @T.Woody - I've added some extra details on how you might go about restricting access to the sqlite file.
    – Steve
    Commented Jun 8, 2019 at 10:01
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The prior answers are only partially true. You can have databases that require authentication but you'll have to compile SQLite separately from PHP.

http://www.sqlite.org/src/doc/trunk/ext/userauth/user-auth.txt

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So, anybody can access it. Isn't it a security hole to keep sensitive information?

As others have said, it was not a design goal of the SQLite folks. They had other goals, like being able to embed the database code directly in your app.

You can password protect and encrypt the SQLite database, but you need to use SQLCipher.

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Additionally to what's been said, you can secure your database on your web server by doing one of the folliwing:

  • place the database file outside of your (web)document root
  • block access to the file, i.e. via .htaccess on apache servers

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