6

How can I iterate and evaluate the value of each bit given a specific binary number in python 3?

For example:

00010011 
--------------------
bit position | value
--------------------
[0]            false (0)
[1]            false (0)
[2]            false (0)
[3]            true  (1)
[4]            false (0)
[5]            false (0)
[6]            true  (1)
[7]            true  (1)
7
  • 2
    Is your 'binary number' a string? Commented May 20, 2013 at 23:39
  • 2
    What have you tried so far? Is your 'binary number' a string (so a sequence of 0 and 1 characters)?
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented May 20, 2013 at 23:39
  • @MartijnPieters it's a binary number parsed from an integer with bin()
    – Rafael
    Commented May 20, 2013 at 23:40
  • 2
    [ bool(int(x)) for x in "00010011" ] would yield [False, False, False, True, False, False, True, True]. Is this what you aim for?
    – miku
    Commented May 20, 2013 at 23:40
  • 1
    @Rafael Your given example is then impossible. bin() will never give you leading 0s. And it'll be prefixed with 0b. Commented May 20, 2013 at 23:41

6 Answers 6

17

It's better to use bitwise operators when working with bits:

number = 19

num_bits = 8
bits = [(number >> bit) & 1 for bit in range(num_bits - 1, -1, -1)]

This gives you a list of 8 numbers: [0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1]. Iterate over it and print whatever needed:

for position, bit in enumerate(bits):
    print '%d  %5r (%d)' % (position, bool(bit), bit)
2
  • This is the way to go. Bit operations on numbers are also much faster than splitting and stitching strings.
    – Reti43
    Commented Dec 16, 2015 at 13:21
  • If you don't know the least number of bits required to represent a number, you can do len(bin(number)) - 2. bin(number) gives you 0b1010101, so you get the string's length and take 2 out of it.
    – jpenna
    Commented Jan 1, 2021 at 16:06
5

Python strings are sequences, so you can just loop over them like you can with lists. Add enumerate() and you have yourself an index as well:

for i, digit in enumerate(binary_number_string):
    print '[{}] {:>10} ({})'.format(i, digit == '1', digit)

Demo:

>>> binary_number_string = format(19, '08b')
>>> binary_number_string
'00010011'
>>> for i, digit in enumerate(binary_number_string):
...     print '[{}] {:>10} ({})'.format(i, digit == '1', digit)
... 
[0]      False (0)
[1]      False (0)
[2]      False (0)
[3]       True (1)
[4]      False (0)
[5]      False (0)
[6]       True (1)
[7]       True (1)

I used format() instead of bin() here because you then don't have to deal with the 0b at the start and you can more easily include leading 0.

3
  • +1. As a note, while I appreciate matching the output exactly, I'm slightly scared the OP will use this verbatim and do checks against "true" and "false" - to be clear, in general code, use the actual bool values True and False. Commented May 20, 2013 at 23:43
  • @Lattyware well i'm not in that n00b level
    – Rafael
    Commented May 20, 2013 at 23:45
  • 1
    @Rafael You'd be surprised at the level of programmer I see doing stuff like that. I tend to assume the worst. Commented May 20, 2013 at 23:46
2

Surprisingly, converting the integer to a string is quite a bit faster than using binary operations. Benchmarking on a Core i9 running MacOS 10.15 with Python 3.7.6:

In [6]: number = 1 << 30

In [7]: num_bits = 32

In [8]: %timeit bits = [c == '1' for c in format(number, f'0{num_bits}b')]
1.84 µs ± 8.51 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)

In [9]: %timeit bits = [(number >> bit) & 1 for bit in range(num_bits - 1, -1, -1)]
3.13 µs ± 69.5 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100000 loops each)

The format() approach runs in 60% of the time of the bitwise operators approach! (Nor is it changed much if you add an if-else to get a list of integers instead of booleans.)

I assume this is because Python integers are stored behind the scenes in a way that doesn't allow for efficient bitwise operations.

0

Why bother with strings? This code is for 8 bits, but changing it should be obvious:

num = 19
bits = [False for i in range(8)]
for i in range(8):
    bits[7-i] = True if num & 1 else False
    num = num >> 1

print(bits)
0

This list comprehension will give you the data you need. Do you also want it formatted under table?

>>> [(i, b=='1', b) for i, b in enumerate('00010011')]
[(0, False, '0'), (1, False, '0'), (2, False, '0'), (3, True, '1'),
 (4, False, '0'), (5, False, '0'), (6, True, '1'), (7, True, '1')]
0
num=19

for val in [bool(num & (1<<n)) for n in range(8)]:
    print(val)
    # do stuff

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