I want to run a C program in DOS prompt. Is it possible?

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    create a exe and run it like any other program..am I missing something? – Naveen Nov 3 '09 at 10:30
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    Please add information to your question to make it more clear what exactly it is you want. But I have also have some good news for you: running a C program in a dos prompt is possible ;-) – ChristopheD Nov 3 '09 at 10:30

Yes, it is possible. You can install TCC which allows you to put

#!/usr/local/bin/tcc -run

as the first line of your source code. This is a compiler that will compile and run directly from source code.

Another option is to use CINT which is a C interpreter. This will allow you to run C programs from the CMD prompt in Windows, which is what most people still call the "DOS" prompt.

  • Seems like the least likely interpretation of Sumeshsankar's intent. Most likely IMO he is a novice who has only ever executed his code from within an IDE and does not realise what is happening under the hood. – Clifford Nov 3 '09 at 17:30
  • I agree that your interpretation is the most likely one, but an answer that explains how everything works under the hood is not terribly useful to others. C interpreters are something that people might have a use for. After all, CMM (aka CENVI) was one of the grandaddies of Javascript (the other main grandad being Sun's SELF). – Michael Dillon Sep 9 '10 at 14:19

If You mean MS-DOS mode in winXP for example:

start->run

type: cmd

goto your program path

cd C:\Your\program\path

type

yourprogram.exe

thats it.

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    He said a C program, not a .EXE. Given that this site is for developers, I think we should assume that the OP is clever enough to understand how to run a binary executable file. – Michael Dillon Nov 3 '09 at 14:22
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    @Michael Dillon: But a C program is an executable, otherwise it is just source code and not a program at all. I don't think the OPs intent is as clear as you suggest, and that is not the interpretation (no pun intended) I'd have put on it. – Clifford Nov 3 '09 at 17:28
  • @Michael Dillon C being a compiled language, i dont know what you expect. The TCC option is valid, yet a smoke bomb IMO. If this question was "how to run a c program in linux", wouldnt it be ok to do $yourprogram ? – Tom Aug 25 '10 at 14:37
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    You have to be very much a beginner to not know that C is normally compiled into binary executables which the operating system runs for you. Yes, its possible that the OP just doesn't understand command prompts at all, but I think the TCC/CINT answer is the most interesting given that many seasoned programmers are not aware of C interpreters. It was a C interpreter that led us to Javascript, after all. – Michael Dillon Sep 9 '10 at 14:09

You can run a compiled c program (i.e. one that has been compiled to an .exe file) at the DOS prompt (by simply running the .exe as other answers suggest). You cannot directly run a .c file at the DOS prompt.

Open the prompt, and just type in the location of the exe, e.g. c:\MyProg\Prog.exe

First you need to download Dev Cpp compiler. After downloading install it. I assume you are installed C:\ drive. Now create file called filename.bat extension. write text as follows...

set path=C:\Dev-Cpp\bin;C:\Dev-Cpp\libexec\gcc\mingw32\3.4.2

now open cmd....

go to save location of filename.bat and run it.

filename.bat

after setting path go where is saved file... for example c:\save\

Now compile your C file using gcc compiler...

gcc filename.c

or

gcc filename.cpp

and execute .exe file...

a.exe

Have fun...

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