70

I have a file containing the following lines:

  <parameter name="PortMappingEnabled" access="readWrite" type="xsd:boolean"></parameter>
  <parameter name="PortMappingLeaseDuration" access="readWrite" activeNotify="canDeny" type="xsd:unsignedInt"></parameter>
  <parameter name="RemoteHost" access="readWrite"></parameter>
  <parameter name="ExternalPort" access="readWrite" type="xsd:unsignedInt"></parameter>
  <parameter name="ExternalPortEndRange" access="readWrite" type="xsd:unsignedInt"></parameter>
  <parameter name="InternalPort" access="readWrite" type="xsd:unsignedInt"></parameter>
  <parameter name="PortMappingProtocol" access="readWrite"></parameter>
  <parameter name="InternalClient" access="readWrite"></parameter>
  <parameter name="PortMappingDescription" access="readWrite"></parameter>

I want to execute command on this file to extract only the parameter names as displayed in the following output:

$sedcommand file.txt
PortMappingEnabled
PortMappingLeaseDuration
RemoteHost
ExternalPort
ExternalPortEndRange
InternalPort
PortMappingProtocol
InternalClient
PortMappingDescription

What could be this command?

2
  • 1
    Note that you're going to be sad when that XML comes to you on multiple lines, or if the order of the arguments changes. If that's at all a possibility, you'll want to look into using a proper XML parser. May 21 '13 at 16:54
  • Hm, double standard with questions that can be answered in 10 seconds vs. ones that require more time? Where is the post asking what you've tried? Oh wait...
    – rliu
    May 21 '13 at 16:59
112

grep was born to extract things:

grep -Po 'name="\K[^"]*'

test with your data:

kent$  echo '<parameter name="PortMappingEnabled" access="readWrite" type="xsd:boolean"></parameter>
  <parameter name="PortMappingLeaseDuration" access="readWrite" activeNotify="canDeny" type="xsd:unsignedInt"></parameter>
  <parameter name="RemoteHost" access="readWrite"></parameter>
  <parameter name="ExternalPort" access="readWrite" type="xsd:unsignedInt"></parameter>
  <parameter name="ExternalPortEndRange" access="readWrite" type="xsd:unsignedInt"></parameter>
  <parameter name="InternalPort" access="readWrite" type="xsd:unsignedInt"></parameter>
  <parameter name="PortMappingProtocol" access="readWrite"></parameter>
  <parameter name="InternalClient" access="readWrite"></parameter>
  <parameter name="PortMappingDescription" access="readWrite"></parameter>
'|grep -Po 'name="\K[^"]*'
PortMappingEnabled
PortMappingLeaseDuration
RemoteHost
ExternalPort
ExternalPortEndRange
InternalPort
PortMappingProtocol
InternalClient
PortMappingDescription
7
  • 9
    Just FYI, from the grep manpage regarding -P: "This is highly experimental and grep -P may warn of unimplemented features." Dec 3 '14 at 23:20
  • 1
    @FukuzawaYukio I think the grep shipped by ubuntu linux should support it right? even though I am not ubuntu user. The question was tagged with Linux & ubuntu, not Unix or Aix. But you comment is correct.
    – Kent
    Apr 1 '15 at 7:43
  • 8
    I had to look up \K: It keeps what's left of it outside of the match (so you don't get name="PortMappingLeaseDuration". Further reading
    – nachocab
    May 19 '16 at 19:53
  • 4
    For those not wanting to use the -P flag; no other extended regex that is supported by the default grep will do what the \K does, but you could simply pipe it through sed: grep -o 'name="[^"]* | sed 's/name="//g'
    – leondepeon
    Dec 27 '17 at 15:19
  • 2
    Alternatively you can also use grep twice: grep -o 'name="[^"]*' | grep -o '[^"]*$'. It produces the same result.
    – Crisu83
    May 27 '20 at 12:58
97

sed 's/[^"]*"\([^"]*\).*/\1/'

does the job.

explanation of the part inside ' '

  • s - tells sed to substitute
  • / - start of regex string to search for
  • [^"]* - any character that is not ", any number of times. (matching parameter name=)
  • " - just a ".
  • ([^"]*) - anything inside () will be saved for reference to use later. The \ are there so the brackets are not considered as characters to search for. [^"]* means the same as above. (matching RemoteHost for example)
  • .* - any character, any number of times. (matching " access="readWrite"> /parameter)
  • / - end of the search regex, and start of the substitute string.
  • \1 - reference to that string we found in the brackets above.
  • / end of the substitute string.

basically s/search for this/replace with this/ but we're telling him to replace the whole line with just a piece of it we found earlier.

12
  • 61
    That's neither simple nor elegant. Just cryptic.
    – Stefan
    Aug 22 '14 at 15:00
  • 35
    @Stefan, to the untrained eye perhaps. But spend time with RegEx and like jazz or Picasso, you'll appreciate the simple beauty.
    – SaxDaddy
    Apr 14 '15 at 19:40
  • 7
    That's what cryptic means: completely unreadable to the untrained eye. Feb 17 '16 at 19:41
  • 45
    Thank you for answering the question instead of proposing a different tool! May 3 '16 at 0:05
  • 8
    While it does the job, it would be beneficial if you actually explain what is going on. Dec 19 '17 at 14:12
44

You want awk.

This would be a quick and dirty hack:

awk -F "\"" '{print $2}' /tmp/file.txt

PortMappingEnabled
PortMappingLeaseDuration
RemoteHost
ExternalPort
ExternalPortEndRange
InternalPort
PortMappingProtocol
InternalClient
PortMappingDescription
1
  • 3
    cut will do the job faster :-) May 21 '13 at 17:07
19

You should not parse XML using tools like sed, or awk. It's error-prone.

If input changes, and before name parameter you will get new-line character instead of space it will fail some day producing unexpected results.

If you are really sure, that your input will be always formated this way, you can use cut. It's faster than sed and awk:

cut -d'"' -f2 < input.txt

It will be better to first parse it, and extract only parameter name attribute:

xpath -q -e //@name input.txt | cut -d'"' -f2

To learn more about xpath, see this tutorial: http://www.w3schools.com/xpath/

9

Explaining how you can use cut:

cat yourxmlfile | cut -d'"' -f2

It will 'cut' all the lines in the file based on " delimiter, and will take the 2nd field , which is what you wanted.

1

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