38

To put it simple, this is what i want (obtained on a Webkit Browser using -webkit-scrollbar) :

And this is what I get on Opera (Firefox doesn't apply the border radius to the scrollbar either, but still applies the border) :

Is there a simple way to make the border not disappear under the scrollbar ?

I dont need the fancy style of -webkit-scrollbar but i would like the page to look clean and symmetric...

36

I've been having the same issue. It's not the most elegant of solutions but, simply put a smaller div inside your outer box so the scroll bar doesn't overlap the outer box.

Like this code copied from this pen:

.box {
  height: 200px;
  width: 250px;
  border-radius: 10px;
  border: 2px solid #666;
  padding: 6px 0px;
  background: #ccc;
}

.box-content {
  height: 200px;
  width: 250px;
  overflow: auto;
  border-radius: 8px;
}
<div class="box">
  <div class="box-content">
    <ol>
      <li>test</li>
      <li>test</li>
      <li>test</li>
      <li>test</li>
      <li>test</li>
      <li>test</li>
      <li>test</li>
      <li>test</li>
      <li>test</li>
      <li>test</li>
      <li>test</li>
      <li>test</li>
      <li>test</li>
      <li>test</li>
      <li>test</li>
      <li>test</li>
    </ol>
  </div>
</div>

3
  • worked great with a minor tweak. Since the content which had scrollbar was huge, I had to make sure the content height is less than the outer div container height. – neelmeg Oct 10 '13 at 16:05
  • 3
    overflow:hidden on the outer box – pmrotule May 7 '14 at 17:18
  • The idea to put in separate div overflow:auto; is awesome! Thanks! – simkusr Feb 4 '19 at 10:44
31

Put the content that needs to be scrolled in a div with overflow: auto. Around that content div put a div with your rounded corners and overflow: hidden.

Now you can see the scroll bar but its outer corners are hidden and are not disturbing the rounded corners of the outer div.

Example:

// Insert placeholder text
document.querySelector('.inner').innerHTML = 'Text<br>'.repeat(20);
.outer {
  width: 150pt;
  border: 1px solid red;
  border-radius: 15pt;
  overflow: hidden;
}

.inner {
  height: 200px;
  overflow-y: auto;
}
<div class="outer">
    <div class="inner">
        <!-- lots of text here -->
    </div>
</div>

2
  • 4
    If you want to use this for content with an unknown height, setting the inner height to auto won't work. In this case you should inherit the height from the parent element instead to make it work. – burnaDLX Mar 8 '17 at 16:28
  • As @burnaDLX says, it won't work unless you constrain the inner size to the outer size such as "height: 100%; " or fixed size as "height: 200px" (that's <= to the outer height) in the example. (do the same for width if adapting for horizontal scrolling) Otherwise the inner size just grows to accommodate the contents and overflows in the outer container, which has its overflow hiddren. – wojtow Jun 16 '20 at 17:27
16

Google implemented something like this when showing their web apps.

enter image description here

With the help of the inspect element and copy-paste, I came with the codes below.

ul::-webkit-scrollbar-thumb {
  background-color: red;
  border: 4px solid transparent;
  border-radius: 8px;
  background-clip: padding-box;  
}

ul::-webkit-scrollbar {
  width: 16px;
}

ul {
  overflow-y: scroll;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  width: 350px;
  max-height: 300px;
  background-color: #ddd;

  border-radius: 8px;
}

li {
  list-style-type: none;
  padding: 13px;
}
<ul>
  <li>google.com</li>
  <li>facebook.com</li>
  <li>twitter.com</li>
  <li>instagram.com</li>
  <li>linkedin.com</li>
  <li>reddit.com</li>
  <li>whatsapp.com</li>
  <li>tumblr.com</li>
  <li>skype.com</li>
</ul>

I don't consider myself a CSS expert, so hopefully, someone will explain how these things work.

Or you can check the docs on MDN:

2
  • 3
    This is chrome-only and not cross-browser – vsync May 12 '20 at 21:29
  • Based on which browser the inspect element was ran on, webkit and such css styles may be applied based on browser implementation of the super set of css for the element. The super set may contain other syling statements which might be applied only on the correct browser. Hence without the source, reverse engineering by inspect element would have to be done on each browser, where compatibility is required. – lal_bosdi Apr 24 at 18:38
0

Would be nice if you could supply a fiddle. Nevertheless, you shoud try changing the box-sizing on the container to border-box (if not already done):

box-sizing: border-box;
2
  • 3
    This CSS property is unrelated to the problem – vsync May 12 '20 at 21:28
  • Or just border-radius: 0; – Simon_Weaver Jun 24 at 20:05
0

slim with rounded corners

@-moz-document url-prefix() {
    .scrollbar {
        overflow: auto;
        width: 0.5em !important;
        scroll-behavior: smooth !important;
        -webkit-box-shadow: inset 0 0 6px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.3) !important;
        background-color: darkgrey !important;
        outline: 1px solid slategrey !important;
        border-radius: 10px !important;
    }
}

::-webkit-scrollbar {
    width: 0.5em !important;
    scroll-behavior: smooth !important;
}

::-webkit-scrollbar-track {
    -webkit-box-shadow: inset 0 0 6px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.3) !important;
}

::-webkit-scrollbar-thumb {
    background-color: darkgrey !important;
    outline: 1px solid slategrey !important;
    border-radius: 10px !important;
}
<div class="scrollbar" style="height: 600px">
   <h1>Scrollbar is slim with rounded corners</h1>
   <br/>
   <br/>
   <br/>
   <br/>
   <h1>Scrollbar is slim with rounded corners</h1>
   <br/>
   <br/>
   <br/>
   <br/>
   <h1>Scrollbar is slim with rounded corners</h1>
</div>

1
  • 2
    This works in chrome but not in firefox, as the question requested. – aleph_one Jul 25 '19 at 22:00

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