16

I'm looking at the solution from Token Replacement and Identification:

string result = Regex.Replace(
    text,
    @"\[%RC:(\d+)%\]",
    match => dict[int.Parse(match.Groups[1].Value)]);

And I'm not understanding how the MatchEvaluator was overloaded.

I understand some of the lambda expression. It takes the input match and then looks up a integer from the dictionary?

But where does the value for match come from? and where does the value returned from match => dict[int.Parse(match.Groups[1].Value)]); go?

Edit: Some of you have mentioned Delegate. Surprisingly after three years in university for CS, I haven't come across this term. What is the Delegate and what does it do in this specific situation?

Last edit: I tried writing my own delegate with the following code Where my tokens are in the form of [@someTokenName]

public void CreateScript(Dictionary<string,string> dictionary, string path)
    {
        //used in the regex to identify the string to replace
        var pattern = @"\[@[0-9a-fA-F]+\]";
        //read in the file found at the path
        var lines = File.ReadAllLines(path);
        int lineCounter = 0;
        foreach (string line in lines)
        {
            line = Regex.Replace(line, pattern, match => dictionary.TryGetValue((match.Groups[0].Value)));
        }

But I keep getting a `Cannot convert lambda expression to type 'int' because it is not a delegate type. What's the difference between the line I wrote and the one found in the solution?

  • 3
    A Delegate is akin to a function pointer. IOW, it's a reference to a method; but you determine at runtime the specific method it refers to. Take a look at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/900fyy8e(v=vs.71).aspx – ThatBlairGuy May 21 '13 at 19:59
  • That cleared things up perfectly – Wusiji May 21 '13 at 20:03
  • 1
    So firstly, the compiler needs to be able to infer that your lambda expression matches a MatchEvaluator, meaning it must take a Match as input and String as output. However, dictionary.TryGetValue returns a Boolean rather than a String so the compiler will yell at you because the return types don't match. In this case you should just use dictionary[match.Groups[0].Value] instead. However, if you want to be fancy and verify the value exists first, I'll write another example in just a moment. – sircodesalot May 21 '13 at 20:18
  • Ahaha, that's why. I think I need some coffee. I fixed it by changing it to Regex.Replace(line, pattern, match => dictionary[((match.Groups[0].Value))]); – Wusiji May 21 '13 at 20:20
  • (Added additional edit to my answer) – sircodesalot May 21 '13 at 20:31
58

This is a regular expression matched with a lambda, so a bit more complicated than your regular old lambda. Here we go:

Given:

String result = Regex.Replace(
    text,
    @"\[%RC:(\d+)%\]",
    match => dict[int.Parse(match.Groups[1].Value)]);

(1) text - the text we're searching through.

(2) @"\[%RC:(\d+)%\]" - means find anything that looks like "[%RC:{number}%]" where {number} is obviously some number (since \d means "a number", and \d+ means "one or more numbers in succession"). Also notice that the {number} or \d+ is surrounded by ( ) as in (\d+). This is important because it means that the number is a "group", which has bearing to our explanation below. Groups are a way of extracting the 'useful' part from a regular expression. That is, we don't want the whole match, just the number value.

(3) When it finds a match, it executes this: match => dict[int.Parse(match.Groups[1].Value)]);

Let's start with this part: match => ..., which is effectively the same as:

public String MatchEval(Match match)
{

}

remember that a lambda expression is essentially just short hand for a regular function (except that the compiler infers the type for match and it's return type based on the delegate it's standing in for - here a MatchEvaluator - more on this in a moment). Here, the input match is passed into the lambda expression as an input. Then you have => which begins the function body similar to the { } that we see in our MatchEval function above. As a result, each time a match is found, the code equivalent to this block is run:

public String MatchEval(Match match)
{
    // Here we grab the value from group (1) (the number in parentasis from our Regex)
    return dict[int.Parse(match.Groups[1].Value)];
}

In short, remember that a lambda is just shorthand notation for a function. If you look at the documentation for Regex.Replace, you'll see that the lambda is standing in for a MatchEvaluator which is defined as:

public delegate string MatchEvaluator(Match match);

which lines up with our function expansion above. In fact, you could simply write:

String result = Regex.Replace(
    text,
    @"\[%RC:(\d+)%\]",
    MatchEval);

(assuming dict was accessible from a separate method) and the function would work just the same proving that a lambda is just a shorter notation for a complete function.

Edit: As for the second part of your question, "What is a delegate", a delegate essentially solves the problem: "I don't know what function I want to use, but I know what signature it has". Consider:

// This allows us to point to a math function with this signature,
// namely, takes two Int32 inputs, and returns an Int32.
public static delegate Int32 MathDelegate(Int32 lhs, Int32 rhs);

public static Int32 Add(Int32 lhs, Int32 rhs)
{
    return lhs + rhs;
}

// Note the variable names aren't important, just their TYPE
public static Int32 Subtract(Int32 a, Int32 b)
{
    return a - b;
}

static void Main()
{
    // We can use a delegate to point to a "real" function
    MathDelegate mathPerformer = Add;

    Console.WriteLine(mathPerformer(2, 3)); // Output : 5

    // Now let's point to "Subtract"
    mathPerformer = Subtract;

    Console.WriteLine(mathPerformer(2, 3)); // Output : -1

    Console.ReadLine();
}

This is useful when you don't know what specific algorithm, or processing technique you want to use until the program is already running. A delegate let's us pick which function we want to point to, and then we can execute it while the program is running.

The way this all relates to the lambda discussion above, is that the MatchEvaluator doesn't know how to handle each of the matches that it finds as it peruses through your string. Instead, by supplying it with a lambda/function you are telling it what algorithm you want to use when a match is found. Basically a delegate is useful for determining at runtime how you want to perform some action.

Edit: If you want to expand your lambda expressions to include more than one 'line' of code, you can use a code block as well. Consider:

String result = Regex.Replace(
    text,
    @"\[%RC:(\d+)%\]",
    match => { 
       return dict[int.Parse(match.Groups[1].Value)]
    });

You'll notice two things different here. (1) Our => is now followed by { } which allows us to put in multiple lines of code. As a consequence though, the compiler doesn't know which value is the return value, and thus can't infer what the return type is. Therefore, (2) we insert an explicit return command to indicate which value is the one that should be returned.

With this simple code base, we could do something like:

String result = Regex.Replace(
    text,
    @"\[%RC:(\d+)%\]",
    match => { 
       // This does the same thing, but with more lines of code.
       // Of course, you could get way more fancy with it as well.
       String numericValueAsString = match.Groups[1].Value;
       Int32 numericValue = Int32.Parse(numericValueAsString);
       String dictionaryValue = dict[numericValue];

       // Same as above
       return dictionaryValue;
    });
  • Great answer!!! – DaveShaw May 21 '13 at 20:03
  • Amazing answer. Wish I could give you more rep. – Wusiji May 21 '13 at 20:37
  • 2
    Np. Just happy to help. – sircodesalot May 21 '13 at 20:43
  • Just the explanation of 'What is a delegate' made this a answer great! Thanks!! – nocturns2 Jun 12 '13 at 15:19
7

Imagine:

string result = Regex.Replace(
text,
@"\[%RC:(\d+)%\]",
lambda);

//public delegate string MatchEvaluator(Match match)
string lambda(Match match) {
   return dict[int.Parse(match.Groups[1].Value)]); 
}

The lambda expression is the same type as the MatchEvaluator: the value for match comes from the regex (just as if the lambda expression were defined as a regular delegate) and the value the lambda expression returns is assigned to result, again, just as it would be if it were defined as a regular delegate.

5

In plain english:

For all the groups matched by the expression, use the group at the index of 1's value, parse the value as an int and use it as an indexer/key to pull a value from a dictionary object called dict to use as the replacement new value.

The lambda is just anonymous function that uses the match as an argument and executes a body in the context of the argument.

3

The lambda is just defining an anonymous function. That function is passed to the Replace method (in this case). Replace can then do whatever the heck it wants with that method. You would need to check the documentation for that particular method to see how it's using the delegate provided; you'll need to rely on that to tell you where the parameter comes from, what it does with the return value, etc.

The MSDN page for that method states, as the description for that parameter:

A custom method that examines each match and returns either the original matched string or a replacement string.

So we know that, for each match that is found, it will call this method, passing the Match object that represents the match it found as the parameter. It will then use the string return value (I know it's a string because the definition of that delegate states so) of that method as what to replace the found match with.

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