52

I have a long list of float numbers ranging from 1 to 5, called "average", and I want to return the list of indices for elements that are smaller than a or larger than b

def find(lst,a,b):
    result = []
    for x in lst:
        if x<a or x>b:
            i = lst.index(x)
            result.append(i)
    return result

matches = find(average,2,4)

But surprisingly, the output for "matches" has a lot of repetitions in it, e.g. [2, 2, 10, 2, 2, 2, 19, 2, 10, 2, 2, 42, 2, 2, 10, 2, 2, 2, 10, 2, 2, ...].

Why is this happening?

1

3 Answers 3

81

You are using .index() which will only find the first occurrence of your value in the list. So if you have a value 1.0 at index 2, and at index 9, then .index(1.0) will always return 2, no matter how many times 1.0 occurs in the list.

Use enumerate() to add indices to your loop instead:

def find(lst, a, b):
    result = []
    for i, x in enumerate(lst):
        if x<a or x>b:
            result.append(i)
    return result

You can collapse this into a list comprehension:

def find(lst, a, b):
    return [i for i, x in enumerate(lst) if x<a or x>b]
3
  • Now I totally get it. The list comprehension is really a good one, I'm still trying to adapt to this kind of compact form in Python. Your answer is excellent, thanks so much!
    – Logan Yang
    Commented May 22, 2013 at 7:17
  • What's funny is that the wrong result with repetitions seems working fine for my later use, since I want to use it to extract columns of a large matrix. It seems repetitions do not affect the slicing.
    – Logan Yang
    Commented May 22, 2013 at 7:22
  • 1
    You'll still get the correct values out of your list, the same values resides at index 2 and whatever later indices. But it's a bug waiting to happen, biting you at some other point in your code. Commented May 22, 2013 at 7:24
3

if you're doing a lot of this kind of thing you should consider using numpy.

In [56]: import random, numpy

In [57]: lst = numpy.array([random.uniform(0, 5) for _ in range(1000)]) # example list

In [58]: a, b = 1, 3

In [59]: numpy.flatnonzero((lst > a) & (lst < b))[:10]
Out[59]: array([ 0, 12, 13, 15, 18, 19, 23, 24, 26, 29])

In response to Seanny123's question, I used this timing code:

import numpy, timeit, random

a, b = 1, 3

lst = numpy.array([random.uniform(0, 5) for _ in range(1000)])

def numpy_way():
    numpy.flatnonzero((lst > 1) & (lst < 3))[:10]

def list_comprehension():
    [e for e in lst if 1 < e < 3][:10]

print timeit.timeit(numpy_way)
print timeit.timeit(list_comprehension)

The numpy version is over 60 times faster.

2
  • What's the performance comparison compared to just doing a list comprehension? Also, why use numpy.flatnonzero over numpy.where?
    – Seanny123
    Commented Mar 9, 2017 at 11:28
  • 1
    It's over 60 times faster in my hands. flatnonzero is simpler than where, here; you don't need to pull the array of indices out of the tuple. Commented Mar 10, 2017 at 2:06
-2
>>> average =  [1,3,2,1,1,0,24,23,7,2,727,2,7,68,7,83,2]
>>> matches = [i for i in range(0,len(average)) if average[i]<2 or average[i]>4]
>>> matches
[0, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15]
1
  • This is not at all what the OP wanted.
    – TerryA
    Commented May 22, 2013 at 7:04

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