1182

How can I easily obtain the min or max element of a JavaScript array?

Example pseudocode:

let array = [100, 0, 50]

array.min() //=> 0
array.max() //=> 100
8
  • 179
    Note: With ECMAScript 6 you can use the new spread operator (three dots: ...) with Math.max() like this: Math.max(...[2, 5, 16, 1]). See my answer made from the MDN documentation.
    – totymedli
    Commented Jun 14, 2015 at 21:26
  • here a benchmark for a speed comparison of the most common ways to do it: jsben.ch/#/1QuTg Commented Oct 25, 2016 at 8:46
  • 2
    In ES6, obtaining both the maximum and minimum can be done with only one reduce call. Commented Aug 21, 2020 at 14:13
  • 1
    @AronFiechter Did you actually read my answer? I explain all the options in great detail with code examples and benchmarks. The call stack size is only a problem if your arrays have a size larger than 100000. While the call stack has to be considered, in most cases it won't be an issue and the more concise code outweighs the drawbacks.
    – totymedli
    Commented Oct 13, 2021 at 22:12
  • 1
    This call stack may be an issue. There's a HackerRank question that requires finding min and max, and the tests run under a limit of 10 seconds. The arrays passed in by HackerRank for the 9th to 14th tests have lengths of >100,000; and will fail if the reduce solution in the answer below is used. The for-loop will pass for some Commented Dec 7, 2021 at 8:52

60 Answers 60

1098

How about augmenting the built-in Array object to use Math.max/Math.min instead:

Array.prototype.max = function() {
  return Math.max.apply(null, this);
};

Array.prototype.min = function() {
  return Math.min.apply(null, this);
};

let p = [35,2,65,7,8,9,12,121,33,99];

console.log(`Max value is: ${p.max()}` +
  `\nMin value is: ${p.min()}`);

Here is a JSFiddle.

Augmenting the built-ins can cause collisions with other libraries (some see), so you may be more comfortable with just apply'ing Math.xxx() to your array directly:

var min = Math.min.apply(null, arr),
    max = Math.max.apply(null, arr);

Alternately, assuming your browser supports ECMAScript 6, you can use spread syntax which functions similarly to the apply method:

var min = Math.min( ...arr ),
    max = Math.max( ...arr );
17
  • 4
    @HankH: maybe. Math.max is akin to a "static" method, so there is no useful this instance inside of it (I hope). So assuming that is true, calling it would run it in the global scope (i.e. window), which is equivalent to passing null as the first paramter to apply/call. Commented Nov 3, 2009 at 18:26
  • 9
    @HankH: passing null or Math or {} or whatever to apply() or call() has no bearing on the outcome. Math.max does not nor should not reference this internally. Commented Nov 3, 2009 at 18:43
  • 7
    Just sharing a jQuery mistake I was making with the code above which took me a long time to debug. A jquery array works fine on everything but the iPad. I had to convert the array to a true native array for it to work. Only affected the single device for some reason Math.max.apply(null, $.makeArray(array));
    – Forrest
    Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 21:17
  • 22
    I've downvoted, because proposed approach consumes O(n) memory in stack frame, and as a result crashes on large arrays. In my case just about 130000 numbers were enough to crash nodejs. Commented Feb 12, 2015 at 12:11
  • 49
    Don't augment built-in prototypes like this. It's not just about conflicts with other libraries; it's also about the potential that the browser itself provides a .max or .min method in future. Perfectly realistic scenario: You use this answer. In 2016, ES7 or ES8 spec Array.max and Array.min. Unlike this version, they work on strings. Your future colleague tries to get the alphabetically-latest string in an array with the now-well-documented native .max() method, but mysteriously gets NaN. Hours later, she finds this code, runs a git blame, and curses your name.
    – Mark Amery
    Commented Feb 14, 2015 at 0:21
462
var max_of_array = Math.max.apply(Math, array);

For a full discussion see: http://aaroncrane.co.uk/2008/11/javascript_max_api/

2
  • 24
    What is the difference between Math.max.apply(Math, array) and Math.max.apply(null, array)? The blog says "...you also have to redundantly say again that max belongs to Math...", but it seems I don't have to do so (by setting the first argument of apply as null).
    – Ziyuan
    Commented Dec 21, 2015 at 13:45
  • 17
    @ziyuang When you call it like Math.max(a,b), Math is passed as the this value, so it might make sense to do the same when calling with apply. But Math.max does not use the this value, so you can pass whatever value you want.
    – Oriol
    Commented Dec 10, 2016 at 9:45
351

Using spread operator (ES6)

Math.max(...array)  // The same with "min" => Math.min(...array)

const array = [10, 2, 33, 4, 5];

console.log(
  Math.max(...array)
)

10
  • 14
    This solution was already provided by multiple other answers.
    – totymedli
    Commented Apr 13, 2017 at 22:40
  • 49
    Math.max(...[]) = -Infinity. hahaha 😂😂😂 Commented Mar 9, 2018 at 11:00
  • 12
    @DavidPortabella not sure why that's funny. That's how it works according to the specification: If no arguments are given, the result is -∞. Commented Jul 17, 2018 at 18:01
  • 11
    yes, I meant that the javascript specification is horrible. It seems obvious that the min of no numbers cannot be computed. In other more serious programming languages, such as Scala, asking for the min of an empty array throws an exception. Commented Jul 18, 2018 at 13:45
  • 1
    This is a very slow method, what if array would have thousands of elements? Commented Mar 22, 2019 at 21:56
294

For big arrays (~10⁷ elements), Math.min and Math.max both produces the following error in Node.js.

RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded

A more robust solution is to not add every element to the call stack, but to instead pass an array:

function arrayMin(arr) {
  return arr.reduce(function (p, v) {
    return ( p < v ? p : v );
  });
}

function arrayMax(arr) {
  return arr.reduce(function (p, v) {
    return ( p > v ? p : v );
  });
}

If you are concerned about speed, the following code is ~3 times faster then Math.max.apply is on my computer. See https://jsben.ch/JPOyL.

function arrayMin(arr) {
  var len = arr.length, min = Infinity;
  while (len--) {
    if (arr[len] < min) {
      min = arr[len];
    }
  }
  return min;
};

function arrayMax(arr) {
  var len = arr.length, max = -Infinity;
  while (len--) {
    if (arr[len] > max) {
      max = arr[len];
    }
  }
  return max;
};

If your arrays contains strings instead of numbers, you also need to coerce them into numbers. The below code does that, but it slows the code down ~10 times on my machine. See https://jsben.ch/uPipD.

function arrayMin(arr) {
  var len = arr.length, min = Infinity;
  while (len--) {
    if (Number(arr[len]) < min) {
      min = Number(arr[len]);
    }
  }
  return min;
};

function arrayMax(arr) {
  var len = arr.length, max = -Infinity;
  while (len--) {
    if (Number(arr[len]) > max) {
      max = Number(arr[len]);
    }
  }
  return max;
};
6
  • assign min and max to last element and reduce the iterations by 1 (while(--len)) ;)
    – Venugopal
    Commented Dec 30, 2015 at 11:21
  • @Venugopal then you need a special check to see if the array is empty and return +/- Infinity Commented Dec 31, 2015 at 7:27
  • 3
    Strange... I went to the linked website... and testing in Firefox 51.0.0 / Mac OS X 10.12.0, the reduce-based approach is 30% slower than loop-based ... very different results Commented Feb 21, 2017 at 9:37
  • jsperf.com/array-min-max-random/1 starting from 60 elements Math methods are breaking equal with while cycles, if array size is greater than 60, than Math methods wins. Larger the array - greater the Math methods overtake. ( for 100 elems Math.min/max is 10% faster, for 1000 elems its +25% ) Commented Apr 19, 2018 at 7:31
  • 3
    In 2019 the reduce solution is the slowest. Even if you work with an array that has millions of elements, it is better to use the standard for loop. See my answer for more.
    – totymedli
    Commented Mar 26, 2019 at 18:35
184

tl;dr

// For regular arrays:
var max = Math.max(...arrayOfNumbers);

// For arrays with tens of thousands of items:
let max = testArray[0];
for (let i = 1; i < testArrayLength; ++i) {
  if (testArray[i] > max) {
    max = testArray[i];
  }
}

MDN solution

The official MDN docs on Math.max() already covers this issue:

The following function uses Function.prototype.apply() to find the maximum element in a numeric array. getMaxOfArray([1, 2, 3]) is equivalent to Math.max(1, 2, 3), but you can use getMaxOfArray() on programmatically constructed arrays of any size.

function getMaxOfArray(numArray) {
    return Math.max.apply(null, numArray);
}

Or with the new spread operator, getting the maximum of an array becomes a lot easier.

var arr = [1, 2, 3];
var max = Math.max(...arr);

Maximum size of an array

According to MDN the apply and spread solutions had a limitation of 65536 that came from the limit of the maximum number of arguments:

But beware: in using apply this way, you run the risk of exceeding the JavaScript engine's argument length limit. The consequences of applying a function with too many arguments (think more than tens of thousands of arguments) vary across engines (JavaScriptCore has hard-coded argument limit of 65536), because the limit (indeed even the nature of any excessively-large-stack behavior) is unspecified. Some engines will throw an exception. More perniciously, others will arbitrarily limit the number of arguments actually passed to the applied function. To illustrate this latter case: if such an engine had a limit of four arguments (actual limits are of course significantly higher), it would be as if the arguments 5, 6, 2, 3 had been passed to apply in the examples above, rather than the full array.

They even provide a hybrid solution which doesn't really have good performance compared to other solutions. See performance test below for more.

In 2019 the actual limit is the maximum size of the call stack. For modern Chromium based desktop browsers this means that when it comes to finding min/max with apply or spread, practically the maximum size for numbers only arrays is ~120000. Above this, there will be a stack overflow and the following error will be thrown:

RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded

With the script below (based on this blog post), by catching that error you can calculate the limit for your specific environment.

Warning! Running this script takes time and depending on the performance of your system it might slow or crash your browser/system!

let testArray = Array.from({length: 10000}, () => Math.floor(Math.random() * 2000000));
for (i = 10000; i < 1000000; ++i) {
  testArray.push(Math.floor(Math.random() * 2000000));
  try {
    Math.max.apply(null, testArray);
  } catch (e) {
    console.log(i);
    break;
  }
}

Performance on large arrays

Based on the test in EscapeNetscape's comment I created some benchmarks that tests 5 different methods on a random number only array with 100000 items.

In 2019, the results show that the standard loop (which BTW doesn't have the size limitation) is the fastest everywhere. apply and spread comes closely after it, then much later MDN's hybrid solution then reduce as the slowest.

Almost all tests gave the same results, except for one where spread somewhy ended up being the slowest.

If you step up your array to have 1 million items, things start to break and you are left with the standard loop as a fast solution and reduce as a slower.

JSPerf benchmark

jsperf.com benchmark results for different solutions to find the min/max item of an array

JSBen benchmark

jsben.com benchmark results for different solutions to find the min/max item of an array

JSBench.me benchmark

jsbench.me benchmark results for different solutions to find the min/max item of an array

Benchmark source code

var testArrayLength = 100000
var testArray = Array.from({length: testArrayLength}, () => Math.floor(Math.random() * 2000000));

// ES6 spread
Math.min(...testArray);
Math.max(...testArray);

// reduce
testArray.reduce(function(a, b) {
  return Math.max(a, b);
});
testArray.reduce(function(a, b) {
  return Math.min(a, b);
});

// apply
Math.min.apply(Math, testArray);
Math.max.apply(Math, testArray);

// standard loop
let max = testArray[0];
for (let i = 1; i < testArrayLength; ++i) {
  if (testArray[i] > max) {
    max = testArray[i];
  }
}

let min = testArray[0];
for (let i = 1; i < testArrayLength; ++i) {
  if (testArray[i] < min) {
    min = testArray[i];
  }
}

// MDN hibrid soltuion
// Source: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Function/apply#Using_apply_and_built-in_functions
function minOfArray(arr) {
  var min = Infinity;
  var QUANTUM = 32768;

  for (var i = 0, len = arr.length; i < len; i += QUANTUM) {
    var submin = Math.min.apply(null, arr.slice(i, Math.min(i + QUANTUM, len)));
    min = Math.min(submin, min);
  }

  return min;
}

minOfArray(testArray);

function maxOfArray(arr) {
  var max = -Infinity;
  var QUANTUM = 32768;

  for (var i = 0, len = arr.length; i < len; i += QUANTUM) {
    var submax = Math.max.apply(null, arr.slice(i, Math.max(i + QUANTUM, len)));
    max = Math.max(submax, max);
  }

  return max;
}

maxOfArray(testArray);

4
  • If you're using typescript the spread operator as shown is compiled to Math.max.apply(Math, arr) for 'max' compatibility. Commented Sep 3, 2018 at 0:42
  • 2
    Also from MDN: "both spread (...) and apply will either fail or return the wrong result if the array has too many elements [...] The reduce solution does not have this problem" Testing Chrome, FF, Edge and IE11 it seems that it is ok for an array of up to 100k values. (Tested on Win10 and latest browsers: Chrome 110k, Firefox 300k, Edge 400k, IE11 150k).
    – oriadam
    Commented Nov 26, 2018 at 8:32
  • This is a very slow method, what if array would have thousands of elements? Commented Mar 22, 2019 at 21:57
  • @SlavaFominII I extended the answer so it covers arrays with thousands of elements.
    – totymedli
    Commented Mar 23, 2019 at 3:13
74

If you're paranoid like me about using Math.max.apply (which could cause errors when given large arrays according to MDN), try this:

function arrayMax(array) {
  return array.reduce(function(a, b) {
    return Math.max(a, b);
  });
}

function arrayMin(array) {
  return array.reduce(function(a, b) {
    return Math.min(a, b);
  });
}

Or, in ES6:

function arrayMax(array) {
  return array.reduce((a, b) => Math.max(a, b));
}

function arrayMin(array) {
  return array.reduce((a, b) => Math.min(a, b));
}

The anonymous functions are unfortunately necessary (instead of using Math.max.bind(Math) because reduce doesn't just pass a and b to its function, but also i and a reference to the array itself, so we have to ensure we don't try to call max on those as well.

7
  • Your ES6 example, is there any reason why not just return Math.max(...array)? Commented Jul 20, 2016 at 23:48
  • @WojciechBednarski this page seems to suggest that using the spread operator is the same as passing an array to apply, and therefore has the same downsides (maximum argument limit). Commented Jul 21, 2016 at 1:07
  • Thanks for this. Just you can correct missing bracket after reduce: function arrayMax(array) { return array.reduce(function(a, b) { return Math.max(a, b); }); // <--------- missing ) }
    – Arkowsky
    Commented Sep 28, 2017 at 11:17
  • 1
    @DanielDietrich I guess doing the equivalent, calling Math.min() with no values, returns Infinity, so these functions could use reduce(..., Infinity) to match that behaviour. I prefer it to throw an exception though (as it does currently), because taking the minimum of an empty array seems likely to be an error. Commented Nov 5, 2017 at 7:50
  • 1
    so far reduce is the slowest. Commented Apr 19, 2018 at 7:24
64

Min/Max Alternative Methods


The Math.min and Math.max are great methods to get the minimum and maximum items out of a collection of items. However, it's important to be aware of some cavities that can come with it.

Using them with an array containing a large number of items (more than ~10⁷ items, depending on the user's browser) most likely will crash and give the following error message:

const arr = Array.from(Array(1000000).keys());
Math.min(arr);
Math.max(arr);

Uncaught RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded


Some browsers might return a NaN value instead. It might be a better way to handle errors, but it doesn't solve the problem just yet.

Instead, for very large numbers, consider using something like this:

function maxValue(arr) {
  return arr.reduce((max, val) => max > val ? max : val)
}
const arr = Array.from(Array(1000000).keys());
console.log(maxValue(arr)); // 999999

Better run-time:

function maxValue(arr) {
  let max = arr[0];

  for (let val of arr) {
    if (val > max) {
      max = val;
    }
  }
  return max;
}
const arr = Array.from(Array(1000000).keys());
console.log(maxValue(arr)); // 999999


Get both Min and Max:

function getMinMax(arr) {
  return arr.reduce(({min, max}, v) => ({
    min: min < v ? min : v,
    max: max > v ? max : v,
  }), { min: arr[0], max: arr[0] });
}
const arr = Array.from(Array(1000000).keys());
console.log(getMinMax(arr)); // {"min":0,"max":999999}

Better run-time*:

function getMinMax(arr) {
  let min = arr[0];
  let max = arr[0];
  let i = arr.length;
    
  while (i--) {
    min = arr[i] < min ? arr[i] : min;
    max = arr[i] > max ? arr[i] : max;
  }
  return { min, max };
}
const arr = Array.from(Array(1000000).keys());
console.log(getMinMax(arr)); // {"min":0,"max":999999}

* Tested with 1,000,000 items:
Just for reference, the 1st function run-time (on my machine) was 15.84ms vs. 2nd function with only 4.32ms.

3
  • 2
    Just spread the array. Math.min(...arr). Commented Jun 21, 2021 at 22:35
  • @RicardoNolde Unfortunately spreading the array doesn't change the way that the Math.min/max functions works (Tested on Chrome v91). If that works for you, please share which browser/version you use.
    – Lior Elrom
    Commented Jun 22, 2021 at 14:37
  • 1
    Sorry, I should have been more clear. The NaN problem happens because you're passing a straight array. In the browsers I have tested, it always returns NaN; that can be solved by spreading the array. The other issue you've raised -- the maximum call stack size -- still applies, regardless of spread. Commented Jun 24, 2021 at 0:12
45

Two ways are shorter and easy:

let arr = [2, 6, 1, 0]

Way 1:

let max = Math.max.apply(null, arr)

Way 2:

let max = arr.reduce(function(a, b) {
    return Math.max(a, b);
});
3
  • Watch out if the array is empty - you'll get negative infinity which may not be what you want. If you prefer to get 0 you can use [0].concat(arr) or with spread syntax [0, ...arr] (in place of 'arr') Commented Jan 4, 2019 at 5:38
  • is there a way to exclude null values in Way 1? Commented Jun 4, 2020 at 8:23
  • 2
    @hafizur-rahman way #1 cannot deal with large numbers! (as #2 can). Try with any array that has more than ~10⁷ items - Array.from(Array(1000000).keys())
    – Lior Elrom
    Commented Feb 18, 2021 at 21:10
42

.apply is often used when the intention is to invoke a variadic function with a list of argument values, e.g.

The Math.max([value1[,value2, ...]]) function returns the largest of zero or more numbers.

Math.max(10, 20); // 20
Math.max(-10, -20); // -10
Math.max(-10, 20); // 20

The Math.max() method doesn't allow you to pass in an array. If you have a list of values of which you need to get the largest, you would normally call this function using Function.prototype.apply(), e.g.

Math.max.apply(null, [10, 20]); // 20
Math.max.apply(null, [-10, -20]); // -10
Math.max.apply(null, [-10, 20]); // 20

However, as of the ECMAScript 6 you can use the spread operator:

The spread operator allows an expression to be expanded in places where multiple arguments (for function calls) or multiple elements (for array literals) are expected.

Using the spread operator, the above can be rewritten as such:

Math.max(...[10, 20]); // 20
Math.max(...[-10, -20]); // -10
Math.max(...[-10, 20]); // 20

When calling a function using the variadic operator, you can even add additional values, e.g.

Math.max(...[10, 20], 50); // 50
Math.max(...[-10, -20], 50); // 50

Bonus:

Spread operator enables you to use the array literal syntax to create new arrays in situations where in ES5 you would need to fall back to imperative code, using a combination of push, splice, etc.

let foo = ['b', 'c'];
let bar = ['a', ...foo, 'd', 'e']; // ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e']
1
  • 1
    Your last example in the bonus would be written using concat by most programers because it let you maintain a single line style. Commented Jul 12, 2016 at 18:54
24

You do it by extending the Array type:

Array.max = function( array ){
    return Math.max.apply( Math, array );
};
Array.min = function( array ){
    return Math.min.apply( Math, array );
}; 

Boosted from here (by John Resig)

22

A simple solution to find the minimum value over an Array of elements is to use the Array prototype function reduce:

A = [4,3,-9,-2,2,1];
A.reduce((min, val) => val < min ? val : min, A[0]); // returns -9

or using JavaScript's built-in Math.Min() function (thanks @Tenflex):

A.reduce((min,val) => Math.min(min,val), A[0]);

This sets min to A[0], and then checks for A[1]...A[n] whether it is strictly less than the current min. If A[i] < min then min is updated to A[i]. When all array elements has been processed, min is returned as the result.

EDIT: Include position of minimum value:

A = [4,3,-9,-2,2,1];
A.reduce((min, val) => val < min._min ? {_min: val, _idx: min._curr, _curr: min._curr + 1} : {_min: min._min, _idx: min._idx, _curr: min._curr + 1}, {_min: A[0], _idx: 0, _curr: 0}); // returns { _min: -9, _idx: 2, _curr: 6 }
2
  • 3
    A.reduce((min,val) => Math.min(min,val),A[0]); even shorter
    – Tendai
    Commented May 9, 2018 at 23:22
  • As a bonus question, how to have not only min value returned but also its position in the Array?
    – Stephan K.
    Commented Sep 4, 2019 at 17:42
18

For a concise, modern solution, one can perform a reduce operation over the array, keeping track of the current minimum and maximum values, so the array is only iterated over once (which is optimal). Destructuring assignment is used here for succinctness.

let array = [100, 0, 50];
let [min, max] = array.reduce(([prevMin,prevMax], curr)=>
   [Math.min(prevMin, curr), Math.max(prevMax, curr)], [Infinity, -Infinity]);
console.log("Min:", min);
console.log("Max:", max);

To only find either the minimum or maximum, we can use perform a reduce operation in much the same way, but we only need to keep track of the previous optimal value. This method is better than using apply as it will not cause errors when the array is too large for the stack.

const arr = [-1, 9, 3, -6, 35];

//Only find minimum
const min = arr.reduce((a,b)=>Math.min(a,b), Infinity);
console.log("Min:", min);//-6

//Only find maximum
const max = arr.reduce((a,b)=>Math.max(a,b), -Infinity);
console.log("Max:", max);//35

16

Others have already given some solutions in which they augment Array.prototype. All I want in this answer is to clarify whether it should be Math.min.apply( Math, array ) or Math.min.apply( null, array ). So what context should be used, Math or null?

When passing null as a context to apply, then the context will default to the global object (the window object in the case of browsers). Passing the Math object as the context would be the correct solution, but it won't hurt passing null either. Here's an example when null might cause trouble, when decorating the Math.max function:

// decorate Math.max
(function (oldMax) {
    Math.max = function () {
        this.foo(); // call Math.foo, or at least that's what we want

        return oldMax.apply(this, arguments);
    };
})(Math.max);

Math.foo = function () {
    print("foo");
};

Array.prototype.max = function() {
  return Math.max.apply(null, this); // <-- passing null as the context
};

var max = [1, 2, 3].max();

print(max);

The above will throw an exception because this.foo will be evaluated as window.foo, which is undefined. If we replace null with Math, things will work as expected and the string "foo" will be printed to the screen (I tested this using Mozilla Rhino).

You can pretty much assume that nobody has decorated Math.max so, passing null will work without problems.

2
  • 3
    Point taken. However why would someone decorate Foo.staticMethod and reference this? Would that not be a mistake in the design of the decorator? (unless of course they were wanting to reference the global scope, and want to remain independent of the JavaScript engine being used, eg Rhino). Commented Nov 3, 2009 at 18:57
  • 2
    The spec is explicit about which specced functions should refer to "the this value" (indeed, that phrase appears 125 times in the specification). Math.max, implemented per spec, does not use this. If somebody overrides Math.max such that it does use this, then they have made its behaviour violate spec and you should throw sharp objects at them. You should not code around that possibility any more than you would code around the possibility that somebody has swapped Math.max and Math.min for the lulz.
    – Mark Amery
    Commented Feb 14, 2015 at 17:59
16

One more way to do it:

var arrayMax = Function.prototype.apply.bind(Math.max, null);

Usage:

var max = arrayMax([2, 5, 1]);
2
  • Can someone explain how this works? This is pretty dope. Is my understanding correct: arrayMax is a function and we bind something to a property of its prototype? What is this apply.bind and does every prototype have it?
    – Sam
    Commented Sep 26, 2013 at 17:39
  • You may check out: benalman.com/news/2012/09/partial-application-in-javascript
    – sbr
    Commented Oct 12, 2013 at 4:25
15

I am surprised not one mentiond the reduce function.

var arr = [1, 10, 5, 11, 2]

var b = arr.reduce(function(previous,current){ 
                      return previous > current ? previous:current
                   });

b => 11
arr => [1, 10, 5, 11, 2]
2
14

This may suit your purposes.

Array.prototype.min = function(comparer) {

    if (this.length === 0) return null;
    if (this.length === 1) return this[0];

    comparer = (comparer || Math.min);

    var v = this[0];
    for (var i = 1; i < this.length; i++) {
        v = comparer(this[i], v);    
    }

    return v;
}

Array.prototype.max = function(comparer) {

    if (this.length === 0) return null;
    if (this.length === 1) return this[0];

    comparer = (comparer || Math.max);

    var v = this[0];
    for (var i = 1; i < this.length; i++) {
        v = comparer(this[i], v);    
    }

    return v;
}
5
  • you should initialize your v with 'this[0]' in case no numbers are smaller than 0
    – jasonmw
    Commented Nov 3, 2009 at 18:28
  • Is comparer supposed to be called in some specific scope? Because as is it references this[index] which is undefined everytime. Commented Nov 3, 2009 at 18:50
  • Fixed, I always forget about function level scoping. Commented Nov 3, 2009 at 18:54
  • Oh now, now @Ionut G. Stan will critique you for the same "wrong context" argument as he did me, since your default comparer (Math.xxx) will be running in the global scope... Commented Nov 3, 2009 at 19:00
  • That may be true, but the new function signature requires no scope as it takes the 2 objects that needs to be compared. Commented Nov 3, 2009 at 19:04
14

https://developer.mozilla.org/ru/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Math/max

function getMaxOfArray(numArray) {
  return Math.max.apply(null, numArray);
}

var arr = [100, 0, 50];
console.log(getMaxOfArray(arr))

this worked for me.

12

I thought I'd share my simple and easy to understand solution.

For the min:

var arr = [3, 4, 12, 1, 0, 5];
var min = arr[0];
for (var k = 1; k < arr.length; k++) {
  if (arr[k] < min) {
    min = arr[k];
  }
}
console.log("Min is: " + min);

And for the max:

var arr = [3, 4, 12, 1, 0, 5];
var max = arr[0];
for (var k = 1; k < arr.length; k++) {
  if (arr[k] > max) {
    max = arr[k];
  }
}
console.log("Max is: " + max);

9
  • Don't use for…in enumerations on arrays!
    – Bergi
    Commented Oct 13, 2016 at 16:56
  • Thanks. I changed my answer. Commented Oct 13, 2016 at 17:58
  • The iteration is still wrong (accessing non-existing properties).
    – Bergi
    Commented Oct 13, 2016 at 18:14
  • What is wrong, I don't see anything wrong. Can you offer an example please? Commented Oct 13, 2016 at 18:22
  • 1
    Modified accordingly now. Hope I understood you correctly. Commented Oct 13, 2016 at 18:47
12

let array = [267, 306, 108] let longest = Math.max(...array);

1
10

For big arrays (~10⁷ elements), Math.min and Math.max procuces a RangeError (Maximum call stack size exceeded) in node.js.

For big arrays, a quick & dirty solution is:

Array.prototype.min = function() {
    var r = this[0];
    this.forEach(function(v,i,a){if (v<r) r=v;});
    return r;
};
10
array.sort((a, b) => b - a)[0];

Gives you the maximum value in an array of numbers.

array.sort((a, b) => a - b)[0];

Gives you the minimum value in an array of numbers.

let array = [0,20,45,85,41,5,7,85,90,111];

let maximum = array.sort((a, b) => b - a)[0];
let minimum = array.sort((a, b) => a - b)[0];

console.log(minimum, maximum)

10

For an array containing objects instead of numbers:

arr = [
  { name: 'a', value: 5 },
  { name: 'b', value: 3 },
  { name: 'c', value: 4 }
]

You can use reduce to get the element with the smallest value (min)

arr.reduce((a, b) => a.value < b.value ? a : b)
// { name: 'b', value: 3 }

or the largest value (max)

arr.reduce((a, b) => a.value > b.value ? a : b)
// { name: 'a', value: 5 }
10

Aside using the math function max and min, another function to use is the built in function of sort(): here we go

const nums = [12, 67, 58, 30].sort((x, y) => 
x -  y)
let min_val = nums[0]
let max_val = nums[nums.length -1]
1
  • 2
    Hmm wouldn't sort() take O(n*log(n)) time whereas merely iterating through the array would take linear time?
    – mbil
    Commented Dec 27, 2021 at 23:39
10

The best way with Math.min(...array) and Math.max(...array)

9

I had the same problem, I needed to obtain the minimum and maximum values of an array and, to my surprise, there were no built-in functions for arrays. After reading a lot, I decided to test the "top 3" solutions myself:

  1. discrete solution: a FOR loop to check every element of the array against the current max and/or min value;
  2. APPLY solution: sending the array to the Math.max and/or Math.min internal functions using apply(null,array);
  3. REDUCE solution: recursing a check against every element of the array using reduce(function).

The test code was this:

function GetMaxDISCRETE(A)
{   var MaxX=A[0];

    for (var X=0;X<A.length;X++)
        if (MaxX<A[X])
            MaxX=A[X];

    return MaxX;
}

function GetMaxAPPLY(A)
{   return Math.max.apply(null,A);
}

function GetMaxREDUCE(A)
{   return A.reduce(function(p,c)
    {   return p>c?p:c;
    });
}

The array A was filled with 100,000 random integer numbers, each function was executed 10,000 times on Mozilla Firefox 28.0 on an intel Pentium 4 2.99GHz desktop with Windows Vista. The times are in seconds, retrieved by performance.now() function. The results were these, with 3 fractional digits and standard deviation:

  1. Discrete solution: mean=0.161s, sd=0.078
  2. APPLY solution: mean=3.571s, sd=0.487
  3. REDUCE solution: mean=0.350s, sd=0.044

The REDUCE solution was 117% slower than the discrete solution. The APPLY solution was the worse, 2,118% slower than the discrete solution. Besides, as Peter observed, it doesn't work for large arrays (about more than 1,000,000 elements).

Also, to complete the tests, I tested this extended discrete code:

var MaxX=A[0],MinX=A[0];

for (var X=0;X<A.length;X++)
{   if (MaxX<A[X])
        MaxX=A[X];
    if (MinX>A[X])
        MinX=A[X];
}

The timing: mean=0.218s, sd=0.094

So, it is 35% slower than the simple discrete solution, but it retrieves both the maximum and the minimum values at once (any other solution would take at least twice that to retrieve them). Once the OP needed both values, the discrete solution would be the best choice (even as two separate functions, one for calculating maximum and another for calculating minimum, they would outperform the second best, the REDUCE solution).

9

Iterate through, keeping track as you go.

var min = null;
var max = null;
for (var i = 0, len = arr.length; i < len; ++i)
{
    var elem = arr[i];
    if (min === null || min > elem) min = elem;
    if (max === null || max < elem) max = elem;
}
alert( "min = " + min + ", max = " + max );

This will leave min/max null if there are no elements in the array. Will set min and max in one pass if the array has any elements.

You could also extend Array with a range method using the above to allow reuse and improve on readability. See a working fiddle at http://jsfiddle.net/9C9fU/

Array.prototype.range = function() {

    var min = null,
        max = null,
        i, len;

    for (i = 0, len = this.length; i < len; ++i)
    {
        var elem = this[i];
        if (min === null || min > elem) min = elem;
        if (max === null || max < elem) max = elem;
    }

    return { min: min, max: max }
};

Used as

var arr = [3, 9, 22, -7, 44, 18, 7, 9, 15];

var range = arr.range();

console.log(range.min);
console.log(range.max);
1
  • @JordanDillonChapian I'd agree, but it would be trivial to extend this to a range function that would be the best way to get both the min and max at the same time IMO - as I've done with an update to my answer.
    – tvanfosson
    Commented Jul 13, 2014 at 14:25
9

You can use the following function anywhere in your project:

function getMin(array){
    return Math.min.apply(Math,array);
}

function getMax(array){
    return Math.max.apply(Math,array);
}

And then you can call the functions passing the array:

var myArray = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7];
var maximo = getMax(myArray); //return the highest number
9

The following code works for me :

var valueList = [10,4,17,9,3];
var maxValue = valueList.reduce(function(a, b) { return Math.max(a, b); });
var minValue = valueList.reduce(function(a, b) { return Math.min(a, b); });
0
9

let arr=[20,8,29,76,7,21,9]
Math.max.apply( Math, arr ); // 76

6

Finding the Max and Min elements of an array in JavaScript.

There are several approaches you can use:

Using Math.min() and Math.max()

let array = [100, 0, 50];
Math.min(...array); // 0
Math.max(...array); // 100

Using Sorting

let array = [100, 0, 50];
arraySorted = array.toSorted((a, b) => a - b); // [0, 50, 100];
arraySorted.at(0);  // 0
arraySorted.at(-1); // 100

Using simple for-loop

let array = [100, 0, 50];
let maxNumber = array[0];
let minNumber = array[0];
for (let i = 1; i < array.length; i++) {
  if (array[i] > maxNumber) {
    maxNumber = array[i];
  }
  if (array[i] < minNumber) {
    minNumber = array[i];
  }
}

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.