64

Why does C# allow this:

var s = "Nice";
switch (s)
{
    case "HI":
        break;
    const string x = "Nice";
    case x:
        Console.Write("Y");
        break;
}

But not this:

var s = "Nice";
switch (s)
{
    const string x = "Nice";
    case x:
        Console.Write("Y");
        break;
}
  • 8
    Any other language allows it? – Vivasaayi May 22 '13 at 14:18
  • 50
    why would you want to do either? – Jodrell May 22 '13 at 14:18
  • 12
    Whether or not it's likely someone would write code like this, it's still an interesting question. There must be some strange scoping stuff going on behind the scenes. – Stealth Rabbi May 22 '13 at 14:20
  • 7
    @rtuner The reason the case statements need to be compile time constants is because the implementation of switch is a dictionary, not a series of if/else if statements. It needs them to result in an object which can be the key of the dictionary. It's also important that there be no side effects of evaluating the case since those side effects wouldn't be generated when testing the cases as they would be in, say, C++. – Servy May 22 '13 at 14:30
  • 10
    Thanks for posting this question; I'm going to add this one to my list of switch oddities and my list of subtle Mono errors. If you're interested in unusual uses of the switch statement see my article on that subject: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/08/13/… – Eric Lippert May 22 '13 at 15:24
119

Because your indentation is misleading, the first code actually is:

var s = "Nice";
switch (s)
{
    case "HI":
        break;
        const string x = "Nice";
    case x:
        Console.Write("Y");
        break;
}

That is, x is declared inside a case statement (though after a break), where it is valid. However, directly inside a switch statement it’s invalid – the only valid statements there are case and default.

Furthermore, const declarations are evaluated at compile time, so x is defined even though there’s a break statement before.

However, note that the Mono C# compiler will not compile this code, it complains that “the name ‘x’ does not exist in the current scope” so Mono seems to implement more checks than the .NET compiler. However, I can’t find any rules in the C# standard which forbid this use of the const declaration so I assume that the .NET compiler is right and the Mono compiler is wrong.

  • 2
    But how come it displays y, if it does actually break? – rtuner May 22 '13 at 14:19
  • 21
    @rtuner const statements are not executed at runtime, they are substituted at compile time. Try and put a break point on it. – Jodrell May 22 '13 at 14:20
  • 6
    But why is any code allowed after the break and before the next case? – Magnus May 22 '13 at 14:23
  • 14
    @Magnus Why are you allowed to put code after a return; and before the end of that scope? It's code that won't run. The answer is simply because they didn't bother to make it illegal; making it illegal was more work than just leaving it, and leaving it doesn't really cause problems. The feature request to prohibit it just isn't worth the effort to implement. – Servy May 22 '13 at 14:25
  • 22
    To address your last paragraph: indeed, Mono appears to be in the wrong here. But one can hardly blame them; this is a bizarre scenario. I wonder if Mono gets other rules about scoping inside switch statements wrong? I shall find out! – Eric Lippert May 22 '13 at 15:26
7

Because the language specification does not allow a const directly in your switch (only case and default are allowed):

switch (expression)
{
   case constant-expression:
      statement
      jump-statement
   [default:
      statement
      jump-statement]
}

Where:

expression: An integral or string type expression.
statement: The embedded statement(s) to be executed if control is transferred to the case or the default.
jump-statement: A jump statement that transfers control out of the case body.
constant-expression: Control is transferred to a specific case according to the value of this expression.

In the first case the const is part of your case logic. The const will is only working because it is rewritten at compiletime and not at runtime.

1

... because switch does this

jump_to_the_label_matchig(s)
{
   label1:
      ...
      done_quit_this;
   label2:
      ...
      done_quit_this;
   d'oh:
      ...
      done_quit_this;
}

and not this

now_jump_to_the_label_matchig(s)
{

   le'mme_wander_around_doing_things_that_could_have_been_done_before_me;

   label1:
      ...
      done_quit_this;
   label2:
      ...

I betcha that if that was allowed, you'd find people willing to do all their programming in there :-)

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