115

I want to write a regular expression for a standard US type phone number that supports the following formats:

###-###-####
(###) ###-####
### ### ####
###.###.####

where # means any number. So far I came up with the following expressions

^[1-9]\d{2}-\d{3}-\d{4}
^\(\d{3}\)\s\d{3}-\d{4}
^[1-9]\d{2}\s\d{3}\s\d{4}
^[1-9]\d{2}\.\d{3}\.\d{4}

respectively. I am not quite sure if the last one is correct for the dotted check. I also want to know if there is any way I could write a single expression instead of the 4 different ones that cater to the different formats I mentioned. If so, I am not sure how do I do that. And also how do I modify the expression/expressions so that I can also include a condition to support the area code as optional component. Something like

+1 ### ### ####

where +1 is the area code and it is optional.

20 Answers 20

201
^(\+\d{1,2}\s)?\(?\d{3}\)?[\s.-]\d{3}[\s.-]\d{4}$

Matches the following

123-456-7890
(123) 456-7890
123 456 7890
123.456.7890
+91 (123) 456-7890

If you do not want a match on non-US numbers use

^(\+0?1\s)?\(?\d{3}\)?[\s.-]\d{3}[\s.-]\d{4}$

Update :
As noticed by user Simon Weaver below, if you are also interested in matching on unformatted numbers just make the separator character class optional as [\s.-]?

^(\+\d{1,2}\s)?\(?\d{3}\)?[\s.-]?\d{3}[\s.-]?\d{4}$
| improve this answer | |
  • Do you think that the question mark is not necessary in (?\d{3}) part of your very first line ? I think we do need one or more occurrence and not zero or one occurrence of a digit within the '(' and ')' – noobcoder May 22 '13 at 19:54
  • 2
    The ? there applies on parentheses (), not on the digits. The complete related regex is \(?\d{3}\)?. \d{3} specifies that there must be three digits between the () that are (made) optional (by ?). – Ravi Thapliyal May 22 '13 at 20:07
  • 6
    note: this doesn't match 1234567890 which may or may not be a problem. for me it was - so I just added ? after each [\s.-] to make it optional – Simon_Weaver Aug 12 '14 at 20:59
  • 1
    @Simon_Weaver Thank you for your inputs. I've added your observation to the answer. – Ravi Thapliyal Jan 12 '15 at 15:17
  • 3
    If you want one that avoids the issue @BobRay mentioned, use ^(\+\d{1,2}\s)?((\(\d{3}\))|(\d{3}))[\s.-]\d{3}[\s.-]\d{4}$. (I basically just duplicated the segment of the RegEx that covers the area code and allowed one variant with parens and one without) – Shrey Gupta Sep 17 '18 at 11:35
122

There are many variations possible for this problem. Here is a regular expression similar to an answer I previously placed on SO.

^\s*(?:\+?(\d{1,3}))?[-. (]*(\d{3})[-. )]*(\d{3})[-. ]*(\d{4})(?: *x(\d+))?\s*$

It would match the following examples and much more:

18005551234
1 800 555 1234
+1 800 555-1234
+86 800 555 1234
1-800-555-1234
1 (800) 555-1234
(800)555-1234
(800) 555-1234
(800)5551234
800-555-1234
800.555.1234
800 555 1234x5678
8005551234 x5678
1    800    555-1234
1----800----555-1234

Regardless of the way the phone number is entered, the capture groups can be used to breakdown the phone number so you can process it in your code.

  • Group1: Country Code (ex: 1 or 86)
  • Group2: Area Code (ex: 800)
  • Group3: Exchange (ex: 555)
  • Group4: Subscriber Number (ex: 1234)
  • Group5: Extension (ex: 5678)

Here is a breakdown of the expression if you're interested:

^\s*                #Line start, match any whitespaces at the beginning if any.
(?:\+?(\d{1,3}))?   #GROUP 1: The country code. Optional.
[-. (]*             #Allow certain non numeric characters that may appear between the Country Code and the Area Code.
(\d{3})             #GROUP 2: The Area Code. Required.
[-. )]*             #Allow certain non numeric characters that may appear between the Area Code and the Exchange number.
(\d{3})             #GROUP 3: The Exchange number. Required.
[-. ]*              #Allow certain non numeric characters that may appear between the Exchange number and the Subscriber number.
(\d{4})             #Group 4: The Subscriber Number. Required.
(?: *x(\d+))?       #Group 5: The Extension number. Optional.
\s*$                #Match any ending whitespaces if any and the end of string.

To make the Area Code optional, just add a question mark after the (\d{3}) for the area code.

| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    best answer IMHO. For my purpose, the \s at the beginning and end are not needed, because I'm using for validation, and the field is trimmed already. – Daniel May 26 '15 at 20:31
  • 1
    By far the best answer and most complete. I also really appreciate the regex breakdown. – Bryant Jackson May 25 '17 at 13:05
  • @Kondal I'm curious about the input you're using to make it fail. It seems to work fine for me with a 0 for the country code. – Francis Gagnon Nov 22 '17 at 12:41
  • <input type="text" name="phone_no" class="form-control" ng-pattern="^\s*(?:\+?(\d{1,3}))?[-. (]*(\d{3})[-. )]*(\d{3})[-. ]*(\d{4})(?: *x(\d+))?\s*$" only-numbers ng-maxlength="10" /> – Kondal Nov 22 '17 at 13:04
  • @Kondal Sorry. I meant the text you are trying to match that is failing with this regex. – Francis Gagnon Nov 23 '17 at 12:32
7

^(\+\d{1,2}\s?)?1?\-?\.?\s?\(?\d{3}\)?[\s.-]?\d{3}[\s.-]?\d{4}$

Matches these phone numbers:

1-718-444-1122
718-444-1122
(718)-444-1122
17184441122
7184441122
718.444.1122
1718.444.1122
1-123-456-7890
1 123-456-7890
1 (123) 456-7890
1 123 456 7890
1.123.456.7890
+91 (123) 456-7890
18005551234
1 800 555 1234
+1 800 555-1234
+86 800 555 1234
1-800-555-1234
1 (800) 555-1234
(800)555-1234
(800) 555-1234
(800)5551234
800-555-1234
800.555.1234
18001234567
1 800 123 4567
1-800-123-4567
+18001234567
+1 800 123 4567
+1 (800) 123 4567
1(800)1234567
+1800 1234567
1.8001234567
1.800.123.4567
+1 (800) 123-4567
18001234567
1 800 123 4567
+1 800 123-4567
+86 800 123 4567
1-800-123-4567
1 (800) 123-4567
(800)123-4567
(800) 123-4567
(800)1234567
800-123-4567
800.123.4567
1231231231
123-1231231
123123-1231
123-123 1231
123 123-1231
123-123-1231
(123)123-1231
(123)123 1231
(123) 123-1231
(123) 123 1231
+99 1234567890
+991234567890
(555) 444-6789
555-444-6789
555.444.6789
555 444 6789
18005551234
1 800 555 1234
+1 800 555-1234
+86 800 555 1234
1-800-555-1234
1.800.555.1234
+1.800.555.1234
1 (800) 555-1234
(800)555-1234
(800) 555-1234
(800)5551234
800-555-1234
800.555.1234
(003) 555-1212
(103) 555-1212
(911) 555-1212
18005551234
1 800 555 1234
+86 800-555-1234
1 (800) 555-1234

See regex101.com

| improve this answer | |
6

Here's a fairly compact one I created.

Search: \+?1?\s*\(?-*\.*(\d{3})\)?\.*-*\s*(\d{3})\.*-*\s*(\d{4})$

Replace: +1 \($1\) $2-$3

Tested against the following use cases.

18001234567
1 800 123 4567
1-800-123-4567
+18001234567
+1 800 123 4567
+1 (800) 123 4567
1(800)1234567
+1800 1234567
1.8001234567
1.800.123.4567
1--800--123--4567
+1 (800) 123-4567
| improve this answer | |
  • This matches stuff like (800 444-4444 – Jake Dec 11 '15 at 4:20
6

Adding up an example using above mentioned solutions on jsfiddle. I have modified the code a bit as per my clients requirement. Hope this also helps someone.

/^\s*(?:\+?(\d{1,3}))?[- (]*(\d{3})[- )]*(\d{3})[- ]*(\d{4})(?: *[x/#]{1}(\d+))?\s*$/

See Example Here

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4

try this for Pakistani users .Here's a fairly compact one I created.

((\+92)|0)[.\- ]?[0-9][.\- ]?[0-9][.\- ]?[0-9]

Tested against the following use cases.

+92 -345 -123 -4567
+92 333 123 4567
+92 300 123 4567
+92 321 123 -4567
+92 345 - 540 - 5883
| improve this answer | |
4

Phone number regex that I use: /^[+]?(\d{1,2})?[\s.-]?\(?\d{3}\)?[\s.-]?\d{3}[\s.-]?\d{4}$/

Covers:

  • 18001234567
  • 1 800 123 4567
  • +1 800 123-4567
  • +86 800 123 4567
  • 1-800-123-4567
  • 1 (800) 123-4567
  • (800)123-4567
  • (800) 123-4567
  • (800)1234567
  • 800-123-4567
  • 800.123.4567
| improve this answer | |
2

The expressions for 1, 3 and 4 are quite similar, so you can use:

^([1-9]\d{2})([- .])(\d{3})$2(\d{4})$

Note that, depending on the language and brand of regexes used, you might need to put \2 instead of $2 or such matching might not be supported at all.

I see no good way to combine this with the format 2, apart from the obvious ^(regex for 1,3,4|regex for 2)$ which is ugly, clumsy and makes it hard to get out the parts of the numbers.

As for the area code, you can add (\+\d)? to the beginning to capture a single-digit area code (sorry, I don't know the format of your area codes).

| improve this answer | |
2

How about this?

^(\+?[01])?[-.\s]?\(?[1-9]\d{2}\)?[-.\s]?\d{3}[-.\s]?\d{4}

EDIT: I forgot about the () one. EDIT 2: Got the first 3 digit part wrong.

| improve this answer | |
  • There is no need to escape dot . when in a character class, so [-\.\s] should actually be [-.\s], because we don't want to match a backslash. – Vedran Šego May 22 '13 at 18:37
  • Would it actually match the backslash? I thought it might not be necessary, but I wasn't 100% sure. – crimson_penguin May 22 '13 at 18:46
  • You are right. I have just tried it (I never needed a backslash before) and [\.] and [.] both match only dot, while [\\.] matches both dot and backslash. Thank you for your remark. – Vedran Šego May 22 '13 at 18:55
  • My opinion about regexes is that, if you are giving a regex to someone, always accompany it with an explanation, or the regex is worthless. Just my opinion. – John Red Feb 10 '17 at 5:42
2

Starting with @Ravi's answer, I also applied some validation rules for the NPA (Area) Code.

In particular:

  • It should start with a 2 (or higher)
  • It cannot have "11" as the second and third digits (N11).

There are a couple other restrictions, including reserved blocks (N9X, 37X, 96X) and 555, but I left those out, particularly because the reserved blocks may see future use, and 555 is useful for testing.

This is what I came up with:

^((\+\d{1,2}|1)[\s.-]?)?\(?[2-9](?!11)\d{2}\)?[\s.-]?\d{3}[\s.-]?\d{4}$

Alternately, if you also want to match blank values (if the field isn't required), you can use:

(^((\+\d{1,2}|1)[\s.-]?)?\(?[2-9](?!11)\d{2}\)?[\s.-]?\d{3}[\s.-]?\d{4}$|^$)

My test cases for valid numbers (many from @Francis' answer) are:

18005551234
1 800 555 1234
+1 800 555-1234
+86 800 555 1234
1-800-555-1234
1.800.555.1234
+1.800.555.1234
1 (800) 555-1234
(800)555-1234
(800) 555-1234
(800)5551234
800-555-1234
800.555.1234

My invalid test cases include:

(003) 555-1212     // Area code starts with 0
(103) 555-1212     // Area code starts with 1
(911) 555-1212     // Area code ends with 11
180055512345       // Too many digits
1 800 5555 1234    // Prefix code too long
+1 800 555x1234    // Invalid delimiter
+867 800 555 1234  // Country code too long
1-800-555-1234p    // Invalid character
1 (800)  555-1234  // Too many spaces
800x555x1234       // Invalid delimiter
86 800 555 1212    // Non-NA country code doesn't have +

My regular expression does not include grouping to extract the digit groups, but it can be modified to include those.

| improve this answer | |
2

Perhaps the easiest one compare to several others.

\(?\d+\)?[-.\s]?\d+[-.\s]?\d+

It matches the following:

(555) 444-6789

555-444-6789

555.444.6789

555 444 6789

| improve this answer | |
  • Perfect one... Thanks (y) – Sushil Sharma Sep 11 '18 at 8:45
2

This code will match a US or Canadian phone number, and will also make sure that it is a valid area code and exchange:

^((\+1)?[\s-]?)?\(?[2-9]\d\d\)?[\s-]?[2-9]\d\d[\s-]?\d\d\d\d

Test on Regex101.com

| improve this answer | |
2

Regex patter to validate a regular 10 digit phone number plus optional international code (1 to 3 digits) and optional extension number (any number of digits):

/(\+\d{1,3}\s?)?((\(\d{3}\)\s?)|(\d{3})(\s|-?))(\d{3}(\s|-?))(\d{4})(\s?(([E|e]xt[:|.|]?)|x|X)(\s?\d+))?/g

Demo: https://www.regextester.com/103299

Valid entries:

/* Full number */
+999 (999) 999-9999 Ext. 99999

/* Regular local phone number (XXX) XXX-XXXX */
1231231231
123-1231231
123123-1231
123-123 1231
123 123-1231
123-123-1231
(123)123-1231
(123)123 1231
(123) 123-1231
(123) 123 1231

/* International codes +XXX (XXX) XXX-XXXX */
+99 1234567890
+991234567890

/* Extensions (XXX) XXX-XXXX Ext. XXX... */
1234567890 Ext 1123123
1234567890Ext 1123123
1234567890 Ext1123123
1234567890Ext1123123

1234567890 Ext: 1123123
1234567890Ext: 1123123
1234567890 Ext:1123123
1234567890Ext:1123123

1234567890 Ext. 1123123
1234567890Ext. 1123123
1234567890 Ext.1123123
1234567890Ext.1123123

1234567890 ext 1123123
1234567890ext 1123123
1234567890 ext1123123
1234567890ext1123123

1234567890 ext: 1123123
1234567890ext: 1123123
1234567890 ext:1123123
1234567890ext:1123123

1234567890 X 1123123
1234567890X1123123
1234567890X 1123123
1234567890 X1123123
1234567890 x 1123123
1234567890x1123123
1234567890 x1123123
1234567890x 1123123
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1

I find this regular expression most useful for me for 10 digit contact number :

^(?:(?:\+|0{0,2})91(\s*[\-]\s*)?|[0]?)?[789]\d{9}$

Reference: https://regex101.com/r/QeQewP/1

Explanation:

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
  • Did you use a tool to generate that explanation? Do share! Thanks – unnknown Jan 3 '19 at 20:38
  • @unnknown Looks like a screenshot from an online regex checker, such as regex101.com. Note that SO guidelines state that all text, code, data, and error messages must be input in text form, not images, because text in images can be difficult to read, particularly on mobile devices, and incurs greater bandwidth. Also text cannot be copy-pasted. In this case, the colors might add something, not sure. Know that generally, "Answers" should include a textual explanation. Amitesh: it would be useful to include a link to this site, with your regex already populated for visitors to experiment with. – SherylHohman Apr 13 at 6:36
  • @unnknown here is a link that produces an image similar to the one in this post. Amitesh's regex string has been already pasted in. You can enter phone numbers to test its results: regex101.com/r/QeQewP/1 – SherylHohman Apr 13 at 6:40
  • @SherylHohman - Noted your suggestion. Thanks and Cheers!! – Amitesh Apr 13 at 11:35
0
^(\+1)?\s?(\([1-9]\d{2}\)|[1-9]\d{2})(-|\s|.)\d{3}(-|\s|.)\d{4}
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0

This is a more comprehensive version that will match as much as I can think of as well as give you group matching for country, region, first, and last.

(?<number>(\+?(?<country>(\d{1,3}))(\s|-|\.)?)?(\(?(?<region>(\d{3}))\)?(\s|-|\.)?)((?<first>(\d{3}))(\s|-|\.)?)((?<last>(\d{4}))))
| improve this answer | |
0

what about multiple numbers with "+" and seperate them with ";" "," "-" or " " characters?

| improve this answer | |
0

I ended up with

const regexBase = '(?:\\+?(\\d{1,3}))?[-. (]*(\\d{3})?[-. )]*(\\d{3})[-. ]*(\\d{4,5})(?: *x(\\d+))?'; const phoneRegex = new RegExp('\\s*' + regexBase + '\\s*', 'g');

this was to allow for things like dutch numbers, for example

+358 300 20200

| improve this answer | |
0

Above regex is a slight modification of @Francis Gagnon.

Objective : To detect any possible pattern a user can share their US phone number


Version 1:

^\s*(?:\+?(\d{1,3}))?[\W\D\s]*(\d[\W\D\s]*?\d[\D\W\s]*?\d)[\W\D\s]*(\d[\W\D\s]*?\d[\D\W\s]*?\d)[\W\D\s]*(\d[\W\D\s]*?\d[\D\W\s]*?\d[\W\D\s]*?\d)(?: *x(\d+))?\s*$

Test it over here Codepen: https://codepen.io/kiranbhattarai/pen/NWKMXQO

Explanation of the regex : https://regexr.com/4kt5j


Version 2:

\s*(?:\+?(\d{1,3}))?[\W\D\s]^|()*(\d[\W\D\s]*?\d[\D\W\s]*?\d)[\W\D\s]*(\d[\W\D\s]*?\d[\D\W\s]*?\d)[\W\D\s]*(\d[\W\D\s]*?\d[\D\W\s]*?\d[\W\D\s]*?\d)(?: *x(\d+))?\s*$

What is in it: The test cases can be a part of the string. In version one the test cases should be a start of a line to work.

Codepen: https://codepen.io/kiranbhattarai/pen/GRKGNGG

Explanation of the regex : https://regexr.com/4kt9n


If you can find a pattern that can fail please do comment i will fix it.

Test Cases: Pass

8 0   0  4  4  4  5   55 5
1 800 555 1234
+1 800 555-1234
+86 800 555 1234
1-800-555-1234
1 (800) 555-1234
(800)555-1234
(800) 555-1234
(800)5551234
800-555-1234
800.555.1234
800 555 1234x5678
8005551234 x5678
1    800    555-1234
1----800----555-1234
800 (555) 1234
800(555)1234
8 0 0 5 5 5 1 2 3 4
8.0.0.5.5.5.1.2.3.4
8-0-0-5-5-5-1-2-3-4
(8)005551234
(80)05551234
8(00)5551234
8@0@0@5551234
8/0/0/5/5/5/1/2/3/4
8*0*0*5*5*5*1*2*3*4
8:0:0:5:5:5:1:2:3:4
8,0,0,5,5,5,1,2,3,4
800,555,1234
800:555:1234
1-718-444-1122
718-444-1122
(718)-444-1122
17184441122
7184441122
718.444.1122
1718.444.1122
1-123-456-7890
1 123-456-7890
1 (123) 456-7890
1 123 456 7890
1.123.456.7890
+91 (123) 456-7890
18005551234
1 800 555 1234
+1 800 555-1234
+86 800 555 1234
1-800-555-1234
1 (800) 555-1234
(800)555-1234
(800) 555-1234
(800)5551234
800-555-1234
800.555.1234
18001234567
1 800 123 4567
1-800-123-4567
+18001234567
+1 800 123 4567
+1 (800) 123 4567
1(800)1234567
+1800 1234567
1.8001234567
1.800.123.4567
+1 (800) 123-4567
18001234567
1 800 123 4567
+1 800 123-4567
+86 800 123 4567
1-800-123-4567
1 (800) 123-4567
(800)123-4567
(800) 123-4567
(800)1234567
800-123-4567
800.123.4567
1231231231
123-1231231
123123-1231
123-123 1231
123 123-1231
123-123-1231
(123)123-1231
(123) 123-1231
(123) 123 1231
+99 1234567890
+991234567890
(555) 444-6789
555-444-6789
555.444.6789
555 444 6789
1 800 555 1234
+1 800 555-1234
+86 800 555 1234
1-800-555-1234
1.800.555.1234
+1.800.555.1234
1 (800) 555-1234
(800)555-1234
(800) 555-1234
(800)5551234
800-555-1234
800.555.1234
(003) 555-1212
(103) 555-1212
(911) 555-1212
18005551234
1 800 555 1234
+86 800-555-1234
1 (800) 555-1234
| improve this answer | |
  • +86, +99 etc are definitely not US phone numbers. Several of your other test cases look dubious for other reasons. – tripleee Sep 12 '19 at 17:28
  • @tripleee let me fix that, i have updated it to any country i hope it works. Additionally i removed the duplicate test cases as well – Kiran Bhattarai Sep 12 '19 at 19:42
0

I'm just throwing this answer in there since it solves a problem of mine, it's based off of @stormy's answer, but includes 3 digit country codes and more importantly can be used anywhere in a string, but won't match is it's not preceded by a space/start of the string and ending with a word boundary. This is useful so that it won't match random numbers in the middle of a URL or something

((?:\s|^)(?:\+\d{1,3}\s?)?1?\-?\.?\s?\(?\d{3}\)?[\s.-]?\d{3}[\s.-]?\d{4})(?:\b)
| improve this answer | |

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