2

I try to understand the exact behaviour of innodb regarding reusage of gaps that may occur in the sequences of AUTO_INCREMENT values. The problem is that it seems to me that I found two contradictory descriptions in documentation.

  1. http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/innodb-auto-increment-configurable.html

In all lock modes (0, 1, and 2), if a transaction that generated auto-increment values rolls back, those auto-increment values are “lost”. Once a value is generated for an auto-increment column, it cannot be rolled back, whether or not the “INSERT-like” statement is completed, and whether or not the containing transaction is rolled back. Such lost values are not reused.

2 . http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/innodb-restrictions.html

When you restart the MySQL server, InnoDB may reuse an old value that was generated for an AUTO_INCREMENT column but never stored (that is, a value that was generated during an old transaction that was rolled back).

So will those lost values ever be reused? And if they indeed will be reused after restarting MYSQL server, how is it possible considering that InnoDB determine new AUTO_INCREMENT value by executing the equivalent of the statement

SELECT MAX(ai_col) FROM t FOR UPDATE

?

1

The first case is normal behaviour and what you'd expect.

The second case is an strange case.

Let's says we are allocating 1024 for a write, but the write or transaction does not complete because MySQL is stopped or crashes. In some cases, the use of 1024 is recorded so 1025 will be allocated next. However, there is a small window where the allocation of 1024 is not recorded in the table for startup. This explains case 2.

Also, InnoDB does not actually do a true MAX (but MyISAM does) for new allocation. It is equivalent. It does do it on startup however

Also see these

Update.

The first link in the question (http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/innodb-auto-increment-traditional.html) explains the behaviour. Selected quotes below in case the link goes dead:

If you specify an AUTO_INCREMENT column for an InnoDB table, the table handle in the InnoDB data dictionary contains a special counter called the auto-increment counter that is used in assigning new values for the column. This counter is stored only in main memory, not on disk

So, it is a run time thing where numbers are incremented separately from the actual table. This explains gaps: allocation of the new value is not the same as writing it.

InnoDB uses the following algorithm to initialize the auto-increment counter for a table t that contains an AUTO_INCREMENT column named ai_col: After a server startup, for the first insert into a table t, InnoDB executes the equivalent of this statement:

So, a successful allocation but failed write due to server restart will be discarded.

  • Yes, this strange behaviour can only be explained by the fact that "InnoDB does not actually do a true MAX", otherwise the counter would NEVER be able to return to old values. But how the heck does MySql initialize the counter then? – Andrey Kon May 23 '13 at 8:52
  • 1
    @AndreyKon: It is stored in a separate counter that is initialised on start. See docs.oracle.com/cd/E17952_01/refman-5.6-en/… THis explains everything – gbn May 23 '13 at 9:16
  • +1 Yes it does: "After a server startup, for the first insert into a table t, InnoDB executes the equivalent of this statement: SELECT MAX(ai_col) FROM t FOR UPDATE;" – RandomSeed May 23 '13 at 9:26
  • 1
    However, I'd rather put it this way: "So, a successful allocation but [not written for whatever reason] will be discarded [if no successful write takes place later on, before server restart]". – RandomSeed May 23 '13 at 9:30
0

I believe this means

If a transaction that generated auto-increment values rolls back, those auto-increment values are “lost” unless the server is restarted before any further auto-increment value needs to be generated.

I cannot find an authoritative reference confirming this behaviour but the below test seems to concur:

bash > mysql test

mysql > CREATE TABLE ai (id INT AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY);
mysql > BEGIN;
mysql > INSERT INTO ai VALUES (NULL);
mysql > ROLLBACK;
mysql > BEGIN;
mysql > INSERT INTO ai VALUES (NULL);
mysql > COMMIT;
mysql > SELECT * FROM ai;
+----+
| id |
+----+
|  2 |
+----+
mysql > BEGIN;
mysql > INSERT INTO ai VALUES (NULL);
mysql > ROLLBACK;
mysql > -- expecting auto-increment value "3" to be "consumed"
mysql > quit;

bash > service mysql restart
bash > mysql test

mysql > BEGIN;
mysql > INSERT INTO ai VALUES (NULL);
mysql > COMMIT;
mysql > SELECT * FROM ai;
+----+
| id |
+----+
|  2 |
|  3 |
+----+
  • But documentation says that AUTO_INCREMENT counter is only stored in memory and is recalculated on each restart so it means that restarting can't affect the counter the way you assume - "unless the server is restarted before any further auto-increment value needs to be generated"... – Andrey Kon May 23 '13 at 8:48
  • I do not see a contradiction. If the auto-increment value is only stored in memory, it makes sense that "lost" values are "recovered" on restart. In the above scenario: a-i values 1, 2 and 3 are consumed, (but only value 2 is really used). On restart, MySQL recomputes that the last a-i value actually in use is 2, therefore the following insert is able to use the a-i value 3. – RandomSeed May 23 '13 at 9:07
  • If value 3 was not stored it wouldn't be a problem that value 3 was obtained again. But I ask whether it's possible to obtain the value 1 breaking ascending order of my ids. People around complain that it's possible! – Andrey Kon May 23 '13 at 9:15
  • Ew. I have never encountered this behaviour, but I really do not know. – RandomSeed May 23 '13 at 9:23
  • gbn has the answer. – RandomSeed May 23 '13 at 9:26

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