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I have a java class that I download from internet.

The code original write to run on pc.

When I run the code on my Android phone, the allocation limit of memory cause the system need to wait for the "garbage collection".

I think if there is any way to rewrite my original code and let the

program just new object once rather than new it every time.

package com.example.ardrone_hu;
import java.io.ByteArrayInputStream;
import java.io.DataInputStream;
import java.nio.ByteBuffer;


public class uint {
public String toString() {
    return Integer.toString(base2, 2);
}

public uint(int base) {
    this.base2 = base;

}

public uint(uint that) {
    this.base2 = that.base2;
}

public uint(byte[] bp, int start) {
    try {
        byte[] b = new byte[4];
        b[0] = bp[start + 3];
        b[1] = bp[start + 2];
        b[2] = bp[start + 1];
        b[3] = bp[start + 0];

        ByteArrayInputStream bas = new ByteArrayInputStream(b);
        DataInputStream din = new DataInputStream(bas);

        this.base2 = din.readInt();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        throw new RuntimeException("error creating uint", e);
    }
}

public uint(ByteBuffer bp, int start) {
    try {
        ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.allocate(4);
        bb.put(bp.array()[start + 3]);
        bb.put(bp.array()[start + 2]);
        bb.put(bp.array()[start + 1]);
        bb.put(bp.array()[start + 0]);
        bb.flip();
        this.base2 = bb.getInt();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        throw new RuntimeException("error creating uint", e);
    }
}

private int base2;

public short times(short i) {
    return (short) (intValue() * i);
}

public uint shiftRight(int i) {
    // System.out.println("shiftRight[0] " + base2 + " " + i);

    // String str = Integer.toBinaryString(base);
    int base = base2;
    // System.out.println("shiftRight[n][1] " + uint.toBinaryString(base));

    base = base >>> i;

    // System.out.println("shiftRight[n][2] " + uint.toBinaryString(base));

    return new uint(base);
}

public uint shiftLeft(int i) {
    int base = base2;
    base <<= i;

    return new uint(base);
    // return Integer.parseInt(base, 2);
}

public int flipBits() {
    int base = ~base2;

    return base;
}

public int intValue() {
    return base2;

}

public uint and(int andval) {
    int retval = base2 & andval;
    return new uint(retval);
}

public void shiftLeftEquals(int i) {
    int base = base2;

    base <<= i;

    base2 = base;
}

public void shiftRightEquals(int i) {
    int base = base2;

    base >>>= i;

    base2 = base;
}

public uint or(uint orval) {
    int retval = base2 | orval.base2;
    return new uint(retval);
}

}

My LogCat

05-23 22:59:38.828: D/dalvikvm(31423): WAIT_FOR_CONCURRENT_GC blocked 91ms
05-23 22:59:38.903: D/dalvikvm(31423): GC_CONCURRENT freed 675K, 17% free 11374K/13575K, paused 1ms+7ms, total 37ms
05-23 22:59:38.978: D/dalvikvm(31423): WAIT_FOR_CONCURRENT_GC blocked 102ms
05-23 22:59:39.103: D/dalvikvm(31423): GC_CONCURRENT freed 675K, 17% free 11374K/13575K, paused 2ms+11ms, total 63ms
05-23 22:59:39.168: D/dalvikvm(31423): WAIT_FOR_CONCURRENT_GC blocked 113ms
05-23 22:59:39.263: D/dalvikvm(31423): GC_CONCURRENT freed 675K, 17% free 11374K/13575K, paused 1ms+9ms, total 48ms
05-23 22:59:39.328: D/dalvikvm(31423): WAIT_FOR_CONCURRENT_GC blocked 102ms
05-23 22:59:39.413: D/dalvikvm(31423): GC_CONCURRENT freed 675K, 17% free 11375K/13575K, paused 1ms+7ms, total 42ms
05-23 22:59:39.488: D/dalvikvm(31423): WAIT_FOR_CONCURRENT_GC blocked 101ms

My allocation tracker in DDMS

My allocation tracker in DDMS

  • the gc kicks in to free memory when it deems it needs to reclaim memory. unless you get out of memory exception you need not worry about it. more frequent gc leads to more pause time. – Raghunandan May 23 '13 at 15:25
  • but the gc really cause my program delay :( – DekangHu May 24 '13 at 0:03

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