I'm trying to figure out how to run a crontab job every week on Sunday. I think the following should work, but I'm not sure if I understand correctly. Is the following correct?

5 8 * * 6
  • 6
    The question is about 'sunday' but the answer accepted is about 'saturday'. ¿? – inigomedina Mar 30 '16 at 20:49
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    Use https://crontab.guru/ site to create any cron expression. – nbi Jan 25 '17 at 11:19
up vote 411 down vote accepted

Here is an explanation of the crontab format.

# 1. Entry: Minute when the process will be started [0-60]
# 2. Entry: Hour when the process will be started [0-23]
# 3. Entry: Day of the month when the process will be started [1-28/29/30/31]
# 4. Entry: Month of the year when the process will be started [1-12]
# 5. Entry: Weekday when the process will be started [0-6] [0 is Sunday]
#
# all x min = */x

So according to this your 5 8 * * 0 would run 8:05 every Sunday.

  • 117
    To be more readable you can use one of sun, mon, tue, wed, thu, fri, or sat for the day. This also saves you from having to choose between using 0 or 7 for sunday. – flu May 15 '14 at 13:15

To have a cron executed on Sunday you can use either of these:

5 8 * * 0
5 8 * * 7
5 8 * * Sun

Where 5 8 stands for the time of the day when this will happen: 8:05.

In general, if you want to execute something on Sunday, just make sure the 5th column contains either of 0, 7 or Sun. You had 6, so it was running on Saturday.

The format for cronjobs is:

 +---------------- minute (0 - 59)
 |  +------------- hour (0 - 23)
 |  |  +---------- day of month (1 - 31)
 |  |  |  +------- month (1 - 12)
 |  |  |  |  +---- day of week (0 - 6) (Sunday=0 or 7)
 |  |  |  |  |
 *  *  *  *  *  command to be executed

You can always use crontab.guru as a editor to check your cron expressions.

  • 11
    Just to help others avoid the silly mistake I have just made, and make sure you set the minute to something other than * or it will execute on every minute of that hour! – user2924019 Jul 27 '16 at 8:24
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    crontab.guru is so useful ! thanks for sharing – Nadir Jan 3 at 17:34

Following is the format of the crontab file.

{minute} {hour} {day-of-month} {month} {day-of-week} {user} {path-to-shell-script}

So, to run each sunday at midnight (Sunday is 0 usually, 7 in some rare cases) :

0 0 * * 0 root /path_to_command
  • 1
    Voting up for mentioning how to specify the command to run each time. (The user column, however, needs to be omitted when editing via the "crontab" command.) – Joachim Wagner Jan 3 at 15:09
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    Sunday midnight is the 0 hour of Monday, i.e. 0 0 * * 1. – Fred Loney Sep 28 at 18:08

When specifying your cron values you'll need to make sure that your values fall within the ranges. For instance, some cron's use a 0-7 range for the day of week where both 0 and 7 represent Sunday. We do not.

Minutes: 0-59
Hours: 0-23
Day of Month: 1-31
Months: 0-11
Day of Week: 0-6
  • 3
    "we" ... who ? which program and version ? – Massimo Jul 18 '17 at 7:51

10 * * * Sun

Position 1 for minutes, allowed values are 1-60
position 2 for hours, allowed values are 1-24
position 3 for day of month ,allowed values are 1-31
position 4 for month ,allowed values are 1-12 
position 5 for day of week ,allowed values are 1-7 or and the day starts at Monday. 
  • 1
    Congratulations on your first answer at StackOverflow! Please be sure to check Answering Guide. For instance, answer typically should has some new information that is missing in existing answers. – doz10us Oct 13 '17 at 11:28
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    this will run 24 times on sunday, 10 minutes past the hour every hour. – Jens Timmerman Nov 10 '17 at 12:14

@weekly work better for me! example,add the fellowing crontab -e ,it will work in every sunday 0:00 AM @weekly /root/fd/databasebackup/week.sh >> ~/test.txt

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