100

I wanted to debug the Seed() method in my Entity Framework database configuration class when I run update-database from the Package Manager Console but didn't know how to do it. I wanted to share the solution with others in case they have the same issue.

146

Here is similar question with a solution that works really well.
It does NOT require Thread.Sleep.
Just Launches the debugger using this code.

Clipped from the answer

if (!System.Diagnostics.Debugger.IsAttached) 
    System.Diagnostics.Debugger.Launch();
  • 2
    I have been using this method and it works great. – Chris Pickford Nov 6 '13 at 10:00
  • 6
    works, but opens up new visual studio. – tchelidze Aug 26 '16 at 9:32
18

The way I solved this was to open a new instance of Visual Studio and then open the same solution in this new instance of Visual Studio. I then attached the debugger in this new instance to the old instance (devenv.exe) while running the update-database command. This allowed me to debug the Seed method.

Just to make sure I didn't miss the breakpoint by not attaching in time I added a Thread.Sleep before the breakpoint.

I hope this helps someone.

  • 3
    Thanks, It worked for me. – VivekDev Nov 4 '14 at 12:21
9

If you need to get a specific variable's value, a quick hack is to throw an exception:

throw new Exception(variable);
  • 2
    Quick and dirty :) – DanKodi Jun 5 '16 at 0:47
4

A cleaner solution (I guess this requires EF 6) would IMHO be to call update-database from code:

var configuration = new DbMigrationsConfiguration<TContext>();
var databaseMigrator = new DbMigrator(configuration);
databaseMigrator.Update();

This allows you to debug the Seed method.

You may take this one step further and construct a unit test (or, more precisely, an integration test) that creates an empty test database, applies all EF migrations, runs the Seed method, and drops the test database again:

var configuration = new DbMigrationsConfiguration<TContext>();
Database.Delete("TestDatabaseNameOrConnectionString");

var databaseMigrator = new DbMigrator(configuration);
databaseMigrator.Update();

Database.Delete("TestDatabaseNameOrConnectionString");

But be careful not to run this against your development database!

  • In EF Core since there is no DbMigrationsConfiguration class use myDbContext.Database.GetPendingMigrations() instead. – stevie_c Apr 27 '18 at 14:11
2

I know this is an old question, but if all you want is messages, and you don't care to include references to WinForms in your project, I made some simple debug window where I can send Trace events.

For more serious and step-by-step debugging, I'll open another Visual Studio instance, but it's not necessary for simple stuff.

This is the whole code:

SeedApplicationContext.cs

using System;
using System.Data.Entity;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace Data.Persistence.Migrations.SeedDebug
{
  public class SeedApplicationContext<T> : ApplicationContext
    where T : DbContext
  {
    private class SeedTraceListener : TraceListener
    {
      private readonly SeedApplicationContext<T> _appContext;

      public SeedTraceListener(SeedApplicationContext<T> appContext)
      {
        _appContext = appContext;
      }

      public override void Write(string message)
      {
        _appContext.WriteDebugText(message);
      }

      public override void WriteLine(string message)
      {
        _appContext.WriteDebugLine(message);
      }
    }

    private Form _debugForm;
    private TextBox _debugTextBox;
    private TraceListener _traceListener;

    private readonly Action<T> _seedAction;
    private readonly T _dbcontext;

    public Exception Exception { get; private set; }
    public bool WaitBeforeExit { get; private set; }

    public SeedApplicationContext(Action<T> seedAction, T dbcontext, bool waitBeforeExit = false)
    {
      _dbcontext = dbcontext;
      _seedAction = seedAction;
      WaitBeforeExit = waitBeforeExit;
      _traceListener = new SeedTraceListener(this);
      CreateDebugForm();
      MainForm = _debugForm;
      Trace.Listeners.Add(_traceListener);
    }

    private void CreateDebugForm()
    {
      var textbox = new TextBox {Multiline = true, Dock = DockStyle.Fill, ScrollBars = ScrollBars.Both, WordWrap = false};
      var form = new Form {Font = new Font(@"Lucida Console", 8), Text = "Seed Trace"};
      form.Controls.Add(tb);
      form.Shown += OnFormShown;
      _debugForm = form;
      _debugTextBox = textbox;
    }

    private void OnFormShown(object sender, EventArgs eventArgs)
    {
      WriteDebugLine("Initializing seed...");
      try
      {
        _seedAction(_dbcontext);
        if(!WaitBeforeExit)
          _debugForm.Close();
        else
          WriteDebugLine("Finished seed. Close this window to continue");
      }
      catch (Exception e)
      {
        Exception = e;
        var einner = e;
        while (einner != null)
        {
          WriteDebugLine(string.Format("[Exception {0}] {1}", einner.GetType(), einner.Message));
          WriteDebugLine(einner.StackTrace);
          einner = einner.InnerException;
          if (einner != null)
            WriteDebugLine("------- Inner Exception -------");
        }
      }
    }

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
      if (disposing && _traceListener != null)
      {
        Trace.Listeners.Remove(_traceListener);
        _traceListener.Dispose();
        _traceListener = null;
      }
      base.Dispose(disposing);
    }

    private void WriteDebugText(string message)
    {
      _debugTextBox.Text += message;
      Application.DoEvents();
    }

    private void WriteDebugLine(string message)
    {
      WriteDebugText(message + Environment.NewLine);
    }
  }
}

And on your standard Configuration.cs

// ...
using System.Windows.Forms;
using Data.Persistence.Migrations.SeedDebug;
// ...

namespace Data.Persistence.Migrations
{
  internal sealed class Configuration : DbMigrationsConfiguration<MyContext>
  {
    public Configuration()
    {
      // Migrations configuration here
    }

    protected override void Seed(MyContext context)
    {
      // Create our application context which will host our debug window and message loop
      var appContext = new SeedApplicationContext<MyContext>(SeedInternal, context, false);
      Application.Run(appContext);
      var e = appContext.Exception;
      Application.Exit();
      // Rethrow the exception to the package manager console
      if (e != null)
        throw e;
    }

    // Our original Seed method, now with Trace support!
    private void SeedInternal(MyContext context)
    {
      // ...
      Trace.WriteLine("I'm seeding!")
      // ...
    }
  }
}
  • 1
    Of course, the debug window can be as complicated as you want (you could even use the designer to create a complete form and pass it around so the SeedInternal method can use it) – Jcl Nov 3 '14 at 6:53
1

Uh Debugging is one thing but don't forget to call: context.Update()

Also don't wrap in try catch without a good inner exceptions spill to the console.
https://coderwall.com/p/fbcyaw/debug-into-entity-framework-code-first with catch (DbEntityValidationException ex)

  • Please check this URLit will be useful to lift your content quality up – Willie Cheng May 10 '16 at 1:13
0

I have 2 workarounds (without Debugger.Launch() since it doesn't work for me):

  1. To print message in Package Manager Console use exception:
    throw new Exception("Your message");

  2. Another way is to print message in file by creating a cmd process:


    // Logs to file {solution folder}\seed.log data from Seed method (for DEBUG only)
    private void Log(string msg)
    {
        string echoCmd = $"/C echo {DateTime.Now} - {msg} >> seed.log";
        System.Diagnostics.Process.Start("cmd.exe", echoCmd);
    }

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