-1

So far, I have this code that parses two different strings operands into double and adds them together

How can I modify it so that it can add any number of strings operands?

double addMultipleDigits(String exp)
    {
        ArrayList<Double> wholeExpression  = new ArrayList<Double>();
        double answer = 0;
        for(int i=0;i<exp.length();i++)
        {
          if(exp.charAt(i)=='+')
          {
            answer=Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(i-1, i)) + Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(i+1, i+2));
            wholeExpression.add(answer);
            System.out.println(wholeExpression.get(0));

          }         
        }
        return answer;
    }
  • 1
    Can there be a "-" in exp too? – Captain Giraffe May 23 '13 at 17:45
  • Agreed, is this method going to be expanded to try and be a calculator of sorts, or anything like that? – ajp15243 May 23 '13 at 17:47
  • 1
    The OP is asking to add any number of operands in the single string argument - not for the function to accept any number of Java String objects. – Andy Thomas May 23 '13 at 17:54
  • So this question's accepted answer is probably useful. – ajp15243 May 23 '13 at 18:00
8

Change the signature to add a varargs.

double addMultipleDigits(String... exp)

It can be handled in the method's body as a String array.

| improve this answer | |
  • Awesome, never knew how to do this before, was always saying to myself I'd look it up... – Christian Stewart May 23 '13 at 17:33
  • Note for user2297666 : with this notation, if you want to put other arguments, "String..." must be the last – Arnaud Denoyelle May 23 '13 at 17:33
  • 1
    Java 7 Varargs docs – ajp15243 May 23 '13 at 17:33
  • I have to have the parameter as one continuous string. i.e. 1+5+10 – user2297666 May 23 '13 at 17:36
  • @user2297666 Do they have to be passed in as a single String? Or can you not just append each separate String in the array to one String at the beginning of your method? – ajp15243 May 23 '13 at 17:42
6

Looks like you want varargs:

double addMultipleDigits(String... expressions)

The expressions parameter here is just a regular array, so you can still use .length etc.

Then you can call it either with an array explicitly, or just several arguments:

addMultipleDigits("123", "456");
| improve this answer | |
  • I have to have the parameter as one continuous string. i.e. 1+5+10 – user2297666 May 23 '13 at 17:36
  • 1
    @user2297666: Why didn't you say so to start with? Your question specifically asked for multiple strings. So, you can get one string... what is your question, exactly? – Jon Skeet May 23 '13 at 18:03
2

Parsing and evaluating expressions is something not to be done without the correct theoretical foundation (I never thought I'd say that). You need to learn about lexers and parsers, and how they work. Once you have produced a parse tree from your input you can evaluate it, or evaluate it inline.

| improve this answer | |
1

All the answers says the correct info to use variable number of arguement. But accorind to your comment it seems you want to have the parameter in a single string like 1+5+10.

It is better if you use varargs but it is must for you to use single string then you can use StringTokenizer. For Example

     StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer("1+2+3","+");
     while (st.hasMoreTokens()) {
         String s = st.nextToken(); // s is the separated string.
     }
| improve this answer | |
0

You can find more info here varargs.

 void foo(String... args) 
 {
    for (String s : args) 
    {
        System.out.print(s);
    }
 }
| improve this answer | |

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