228

I have some object.ID-s which I try to store in the user session as tuple. When I add first one it works but tuple looks like (u'2',) but when I try to add new one using mytuple = mytuple + new.id got error can only concatenate tuple (not "unicode") to tuple.

10 Answers 10

405

You need to make the second element a 1-tuple, eg:

a = ('2',)
b = 'z'
new = a + (b,)
6
  • 32
    Why you need this comma
    – SIslam
    Feb 7, 2016 at 9:16
  • 58
    @SIslam Without the comma, it will just be interpreted as brackets usually used to get around the order of precedence: (a+b)*c Feb 25, 2016 at 5:54
  • 2
    yeah, but you can do new = a + b instead of new = a + (b,). AFAICT, works the same in python3 and python2.7.
    – ILMostro_7
    Jun 15, 2018 at 11:42
  • 9
    @ILMostro_7 depends what b is though Jun 15, 2018 at 11:59
  • 5
    Or shortly a += ('z',), as mentioned in bellow answer
    – artu-hnrq
    Dec 21, 2019 at 4:03
95

Since Python 3.5 (PEP 448) you can do unpacking within a tuple, list set, and dict:

a = ('2',)
b = 'z'
new = (*a, b)
2
  • 1
    I am trying it on Python 3.7.10, and it works with a = ('2'). That is without the additional comma.
    – nocibambi
    May 22, 2021 at 11:42
  • 2
    @nocibambi the comma makes it a tuple, without it it's just a string. Try a = ('23') and new becomes ('2', '3', 'z'). If you add the comma then you get ('23', 'z').
    – nitely
    Aug 8, 2021 at 5:42
43

From tuple to list to tuple :

a = ('2',)
b = 'b'

l = list(a)
l.append(b)

tuple(l)

Or with a longer list of items to append

a = ('2',)
items = ['o', 'k', 'd', 'o']

l = list(a)

for x in items:
    l.append(x)

print tuple(l)

gives you

>>> 
('2', 'o', 'k', 'd', 'o')

The point here is: List is a mutable sequence type. So you can change a given list by adding or removing elements. Tuple is an immutable sequence type. You can't change a tuple. So you have to create a new one.

4
  • 6
    This will be twice as slow as just adding two tuples
    – jamylak
    May 24, 2013 at 8:34
  • 3
    However if you note to OP to convert to list at the beginning, append items, and then at the very end convert to tuple then this is the best solution +1
    – jamylak
    May 24, 2013 at 9:04
  • two items including the first itemin list. but you are right, i should better add a longer=list example, see my edit
    – kiriloff
    May 24, 2013 at 10:41
  • i kinda like this answer the best... while it is probably a bit more expensive, it looks very clean.
    – ShellDude
    Dec 17, 2022 at 14:43
19

Tuple can only allow adding tuple to it. The best way to do it is:

mytuple =(u'2',)
mytuple +=(new.id,)

I tried the same scenario with the below data it all seems to be working fine.

>>> mytuple = (u'2',)
>>> mytuple += ('example text',)
>>> print mytuple
(u'2','example text')
12
>>> x = (u'2',)
>>> x += u"random string"

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#11>", line 1, in <module>
    x += u"random string"
TypeError: can only concatenate tuple (not "unicode") to tuple
>>> x += (u"random string", )  # concatenate a one-tuple instead
>>> x
(u'2', u'random string')
0
9

#1 form

a = ('x', 'y')
b = a + ('z',)
print(b)

#2 form

a = ('x', 'y')
b = a + tuple('b')
print(b)
1
  • 3
    second option does not work. TypeError: 'int' object is not iterable
    – Pallav Jha
    Oct 10, 2017 at 6:35
3

Bottom line, the easiest way to append to a tuple is to enclose the element being added with parentheses and a comma.

t = ('a', 4, 'string')
t = t + (5.0,)
print(t)

out: ('a', 4, 'string', 5.0)
3

If the comma bugs you, you can specify it's a tuple using tuple().

ex_tuple = ('a', 'b')
ex_tuple += tuple('c')
print(ex_tuple)
2
  • Note: if 'c' is an int, you might as well add the comma (or use str(c))
    – Thomas
    Sep 15, 2022 at 2:43
  • Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Sep 19, 2022 at 11:01
-1

my favorite:

myTuple = tuple(list(myTuple).append(newItem))

Yes, I know it is expensive, but it sure looks cool :)

-2
tup = (23, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8)
n_tup = tuple(map(lambda x: x+3, tup))
print(n_tup)

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