7

I am validating username (case-insensitive) and password (case-sensitive) from database

I am using Entity Framework 5.0 to interact with database

In the database password is

"0x11A46971EFF1E1A2CA228CF592CA37DC77E7CCF759602D53629C22B693AEEE96CCD9F889D8E9A92C19391E6BD2DD07E741E9B7AA07E391ACDC939B993C9D7F5D"

I am expecting null in return for my following code block when I change case of password to lower i.e.

"0x11a46971eff1e1a2ca228cf592ca37dc77e7ccf759602d53629c22b693aeee96ccd9f889d8e9a92c19391e6bd2dd07e741e9b7aa07e391acdc939b993c9d7f5d"

but it does not fail and return proper user entity.

using (var context = new MyDbContext(ConnectionString))
{
  return context.Users.Where(x => (x.Name.Equals(userName, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) && x.Password.Equals(password))).FirstOrDefault();
}

Whereas if I get all Users and then compare it gives proper output i.e. user == null

using (var context = new MyDbContext(ConnectionString))
{
  var users = context.Users.ToList();

  return users.Where(x => (x.Name.Equals(userName,StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) && x.Password.Equals(password))).FirstOrDefault();
}

This is Strange? Why it is happening? How to write case sensitive query to SQL from LINQ?

5
  • 2
    what happens when your run the sql manually? Commented May 24, 2013 at 12:24
  • x.AuthenticationSecret.Equals(password) VS x.Password.Equals(password) Commented May 24, 2013 at 12:26
  • Also don't use context.Users.ToList();, it iterates on all the table. Commented May 24, 2013 at 12:27
  • @AhmedKRAIEM that was type, edited the question please see. Commented May 24, 2013 at 12:29
  • @DanielA.White both query returns true (i got that sql is case insensitive) Commented May 24, 2013 at 13:16

6 Answers 6

12

SQL is not case sensitive. If you looked at the generated SQL it would look something like this:

EXISTS(SELECT * FROM Users WHERE userName = 'foo' AND Password = '0x11a46971eff1e1a2ca228cf592ca37dc77e7ccf759602d53629c22b693aeee96ccd9f889d8e9a92c19391e6bd2dd07e741e9b7aa07e391acdc939b993c9d7f5d')

It will return true regardless of case. The second example calls ToList so it is now doing a .net string compare what IS case sensitive.

3
  • 3
    I believe you can make MSSQL case sensitive by specifying a case sensitive collation for that column.
    – Jonathan
    Commented May 24, 2013 at 13:24
  • 5
    You can yes, you change the collate method for that column. Its not something I would recommend because if your not aware of the change you could get unexpected results. blog.sqlauthority.com/2007/04/30/…
    – pingoo
    Commented May 24, 2013 at 13:32
  • 3
    Also, the password is actually encoded in a manner that does not consider case sensitivity. 0xAA and 0xaa are functionally equivalent. Commented May 24, 2013 at 17:25
7

When using

return context.Users.Where(x => (x.Name.Equals(userName, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) && x.AuthenticationSecret.Equals(password))).FirstOrDefault();

you work on a lazyloaded EntityCollection. Because SQL is not case sensitive it will return true every time.

If you are using

var users = context.Users.ToList();

you switch from LINQ To Entities to LINQ To Objects, so you can now make a case sensitive comparison.

The big disadvantage is that everytime you are using ToList() your Query will be executed immediatly and you will load the COMPLETE List of Users from the Database.

3

The SQL look-up is case insensitive and when you do the ToList first you end up doing a case sensitive comparison. But the ToList will return everything from the DB. instead do the Where on the db and then a further comparison to make sure the password is the correct case.

using (var context = new MyDbContext(ConnectionString))
{
  var users = context.Users.Where(x => x.Name == userName && x.Password == password).ToList();
  return users.FirstOrDefault(x =>  x.Password.Equals(password)));
}
2
  • unless you don't cast it to List it will compare case-insensitively. I edited your answer by adding .ToList(); in the end of first linq to sql Commented May 24, 2013 at 13:46
  • this is not possible in my scenario that two users have same username, thus it is fine to query database with username and case insensitive password and later check only for case sensitive password. Commented May 25, 2013 at 9:52
2

As @nmclean mentioned, this is because your database is configured to perform case insensitive comparisons. The following small program shows how EF completely ignores the StringComparison values passed to String.Equals. It also shows how changing the collation of the database column achieves what you need.

This is an imporant concept when working with EF (and other LINQ providers too). Your query as it is written looks like normal .NET code. However, it isn't! Many providers translate the code to something completely different, in this case SQL (for SQL Server, Transact-SQL). Only a sub-set of the available .NET methods will work at all (which is why, for example, you cant use Regex in an EF query), and those that do work may exhibit subtly different behaviour compared to what you would expect.

Where you use ToList() on a query, then apply your filter, you are actually using LINQ to Objects, not EF, to apply the filter. LINQ to Objects is "real" .NET, so you have the full range of .NET functionality at your disposal. Of course, you lose the benefit of having your code run on the SQL Server, so this isn't usually an option.

using System;
using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;
using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.Schema;
using System.Data.Entity;
using System.Linq;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    public class Initializer<T> : DropCreateDatabaseAlways<T> where T : DbContext
    {
        protected override void Seed(T context)
        {
            base.Seed(context);

            // Comment out this line and note how the count changes.
            context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand("ALTER TABLE MyEntity ALTER COLUMN MyString nvarchar(MAX) COLLATE Latin1_General_CS_AS");
        }
    }

    [Table("MyEntity")]
    public class MyEntity
    {
        [Key]
        public virtual int MyEntityId { get; set; }

        [Required]
        public virtual string MyString { get; set; }
    }

    public class MyContext : DbContext
    {
        public DbSet<MyEntity> Entities
        {
            get { return this.Set<MyEntity>(); }
        }

        protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
        {
            base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);

            var e = modelBuilder.Entity<MyEntity>();
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Database.SetInitializer(new Initializer<MyContext>());

            using (MyContext context = new MyContext())
            {
                context.Entities.Add(new MyEntity { MyString = "aaa" });
                context.Entities.Add(new MyEntity { MyString = "AAA" });

                context.SaveChanges();
            }

            using (MyContext context = new MyContext())
            {
                var caseSensitiveQuery = from e in context.Entities
                                         where e.MyString.Equals("aaa", StringComparison.Ordinal)
                                         select e;

                var caseInsensitiveQuery = from e in context.Entities
                                           where e.MyString.Equals("aaa", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)
                                           select e;

                // Note how the StringComparison parameter is completely ignored.  Both EF queries are identical.
                Console.WriteLine("Case sensitive query (count = {0}):\r\n{1}", caseSensitiveQuery.Count(), caseSensitiveQuery);
                Console.WriteLine();

                Console.WriteLine("Case insensitive query (count = {0}):\r\n{1}", caseInsensitiveQuery.Count(), caseInsensitiveQuery);
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
2
  • You can yes, you change the collate method for that column. Its not something I would recommend because if your not aware of the change you could get unexpected results. blog.sqlauthority.com/2007 Commented May 25, 2013 at 9:53
  • @ImranRizvi - I'm not sure I agree with that. It's true that collations are often a source of confusion, but they do exist for a reason. The collation of a column should be selected according to the desired sorting and comparison behaviour. Ususally one collation is appropriate for an entire database or server, but here there is good reason to deviate from that. As regards the observation, "you could get unexpected results," one could argue that you're already getting unexpected results! The collation change would give you what you hoped for all along!
    – Olly
    Commented May 26, 2013 at 0:23
1

There is a more detailed answer to this here:

https://stackoverflow.com/a/3843382/933416

If you need to, you can configure the column to be case sensitive on the server side. But in your case, I don't see why you even need to query the password. Surely there is only one password for each username, and a username is meant to be case insensitive -- so why not just query by username and then check the password on the result?

1
  • Isn't letting out user detail from SQL box without authenticated security vulnerability. Commented May 24, 2013 at 13:06
-1

As everyone else has already mentioned, the cause of the problem is that SQL Server defaults to not case sensitive and C# defaults to case sensitive.

You can change the password field from varchar to varbinary to get around this problem.


Why the anonymous down votes? Using a string to store and compare what appears to be a 64 byte hash value is not the best approach. There's no need to base 64 encode a hash to store it (unless Entity Framework can't handle it?).

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307020 - How to compute and compare hash values by using Visual C# Comparing hash passwords

1
  • Indeed! And EF does support varbinary; it corresponds to a .NET byte[].
    – Olly
    Commented May 26, 2013 at 0:26

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