75

I have a matrix (relatively big) that I need to transpose. For example assume that my matrix is

a b c d e f
g h i j k l
m n o p q r 

I want the result be as follows:

a g m
b h n
c I o
d j p
e k q
f l r

What is the fastest way to do this?

  • 2
    That's called "transposing". Rotating by 90 degrees is a completely different notion. – Andy Prowl May 24 '13 at 14:26
  • 32
    And the fastest way is not to rotate it but to simply swap the index order when you access the array. – High Performance Mark May 24 '13 at 14:27
  • 2
    No matter how fast it is, you have to access all the elements of the matrix anyway. – taocp May 24 '13 at 14:28
  • 9
    @HighPerformanceMark: I would guess it depends, if you then wish to access the matrix repetitively in row order, having a "transposed" flag will hit you hard. – Matthieu M. May 24 '13 at 14:45
  • 1
    @HighPerformanceMark if the matrix is stored as a 2D array, swapping indices will not work when the number of columns and rows are not equal. You will end up accessing memory outside of the array! – Marc Claesen May 24 '13 at 20:40

11 Answers 11

119

This is a good question. There are many reason you would want to actually transpose the matrix in memory rather than just swap coordinates, e.g. in matrix multiplication and Gaussian smearing.

First let me list one of the functions I use for the transpose (EDIT: please see the end of my answer where I found a much faster solution)

void transpose(float *src, float *dst, const int N, const int M) {
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for(int n = 0; n<N*M; n++) {
        int i = n/N;
        int j = n%N;
        dst[n] = src[M*j + i];
    }
}

Now let's see why the transpose is useful. Consider matrix multiplication C = A*B. We could do it this way.

for(int i=0; i<N; i++) {
    for(int j=0; j<K; j++) {
        float tmp = 0;
        for(int l=0; l<M; l++) {
            tmp += A[M*i+l]*B[K*l+j];
        }
        C[K*i + j] = tmp;
    }
}

That way, however, is going to have a lot of cache misses. A much faster solution is to take the transpose of B first

transpose(B);
for(int i=0; i<N; i++) {
    for(int j=0; j<K; j++) {
        float tmp = 0;
        for(int l=0; l<M; l++) {
            tmp += A[M*i+l]*B[K*j+l];
        }
        C[K*i + j] = tmp;
    }
}
transpose(B);

Matrix multiplication is O(n^3) and the transpose is O(n^2), so taking the transpose should have a negligible effect on the computation time (for large n). In matrix multiplication loop tiling is even more effective than taking the transpose but that's much more complicated.

I wish I knew a faster way to do the transpose (Edit: I found a faster solution, see the end of my answer). When Haswell/AVX2 comes out in a few weeks it will have a gather function. I don't know if that will be helpful in this case but I could image gathering a column and writing out a row. Maybe it will make the transpose unnecessary.

For Gaussian smearing what you do is smear horizontally and then smear vertically. But smearing vertically has the cache problem so what you do is

Smear image horizontally
transpose output 
Smear output horizontally
transpose output

Here is a paper by Intel explaining that http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/iir-gaussian-blur-filter-implementation-using-intel-advanced-vector-extensions

Lastly, what I actually do in matrix multiplication (and in Gaussian smearing) is not take exactly the transpose but take the transpose in widths of a certain vector size (e.g. 4 or 8 for SSE/AVX). Here is the function I use

void reorder_matrix(const float* A, float* B, const int N, const int M, const int vec_size) {
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for(int n=0; n<M*N; n++) {
        int k = vec_size*(n/N/vec_size);
        int i = (n/vec_size)%N;
        int j = n%vec_size;
        B[n] = A[M*i + k + j];
    }
}

EDIT:

I tried several function to find the fastest transpose for large matrices. In the end the fastest result is to use loop blocking with block_size=16 (Edit: I found a faster solution using SSE and loop blocking - see below). This code works for any NxM matrix (i.e. the matrix does not have to be square).

inline void transpose_scalar_block(float *A, float *B, const int lda, const int ldb, const int block_size) {
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for(int i=0; i<block_size; i++) {
        for(int j=0; j<block_size; j++) {
            B[j*ldb + i] = A[i*lda +j];
        }
    }
}

inline void transpose_block(float *A, float *B, const int n, const int m, const int lda, const int ldb, const int block_size) {
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for(int i=0; i<n; i+=block_size) {
        for(int j=0; j<m; j+=block_size) {
            transpose_scalar_block(&A[i*lda +j], &B[j*ldb + i], lda, ldb, block_size);
        }
    }
}

The values lda and ldb are the width of the matrix. These need to be multiples of the block size. To find the values and allocate the memory for e.g. a 3000x1001 matrix I do something like this

#define ROUND_UP(x, s) (((x)+((s)-1)) & -(s))
const int n = 3000;
const int m = 1001;
int lda = ROUND_UP(m, 16);
int ldb = ROUND_UP(n, 16);

float *A = (float*)_mm_malloc(sizeof(float)*lda*ldb, 64);
float *B = (float*)_mm_malloc(sizeof(float)*lda*ldb, 64);

For 3000x1001 this returns ldb = 3008 and lda = 1008

Edit:

I found an even faster solution using SSE intrinsics:

inline void transpose4x4_SSE(float *A, float *B, const int lda, const int ldb) {
    __m128 row1 = _mm_load_ps(&A[0*lda]);
    __m128 row2 = _mm_load_ps(&A[1*lda]);
    __m128 row3 = _mm_load_ps(&A[2*lda]);
    __m128 row4 = _mm_load_ps(&A[3*lda]);
     _MM_TRANSPOSE4_PS(row1, row2, row3, row4);
     _mm_store_ps(&B[0*ldb], row1);
     _mm_store_ps(&B[1*ldb], row2);
     _mm_store_ps(&B[2*ldb], row3);
     _mm_store_ps(&B[3*ldb], row4);
}

inline void transpose_block_SSE4x4(float *A, float *B, const int n, const int m, const int lda, const int ldb ,const int block_size) {
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for(int i=0; i<n; i+=block_size) {
        for(int j=0; j<m; j+=block_size) {
            int max_i2 = i+block_size < n ? i + block_size : n;
            int max_j2 = j+block_size < m ? j + block_size : m;
            for(int i2=i; i2<max_i2; i2+=4) {
                for(int j2=j; j2<max_j2; j2+=4) {
                    transpose4x4_SSE(&A[i2*lda +j2], &B[j2*ldb + i2], lda, ldb);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    Nice shot, but I am not sure 'Matrix multiplication is O(n^3)', I think it is O(n^2). – ulyssis2 Dec 4 '16 at 11:13
  • 1
    @ulyssis2 It's O(n^3), unless you use Strassen's Matrix Multiplication(O(n^2.8074)). user2088790: This is very well done. Keeping this in my personal collection. :) – saurabheights Dec 28 '16 at 15:19
  • 6
    In case, anyone wants to know who wrote this answer it was I. I quit SO once, got over it, and came back. – Z boson Mar 16 '17 at 9:50
  • @ulyssis2 Naive matrix multiplication is most definitely O(n^3), and, as far as I know, compute kernels implement the naive algorithm (I think this is because Strassen's ends up doing way more operations (additions), which is bad if you can do fast products, but I could be wrong). It is an open problem whether matrix multiplication can be O(n^2) or not. – étale-cohomology May 9 '17 at 0:47
  • It is usually a better option to rely on a linear algebra library to do the work for you. Modern day libraries such as Intel MKL, OpenBLAS, etc. provide dynamic CPU dispatching which selects the best implementation available for your hardware (for example, wider vector registers than SSE might be available: AVX AVX2, AVX512...), so you don't need to make a non-portable program to get a fast program. – Jorge Bellon Sep 21 at 10:01
38

This is going to depend on your application but in general the fastest way to transpose a matrix would be to invert your coordinates when you do a look up, then you do not have to actually move any data.

  • 30
    This is great if it's a small matrix or you only read from it once. However, if the transposed matrix is large and needs to be reused many times, you may still to save a fast transposed version to get better memory access pattern. (+1, btw) – Agentlien May 24 '13 at 14:34
  • 2
    @Agentlien: Why would A[j][i] be any slower than A[i][j]? – beaker May 24 '13 at 14:37
  • 29
    @beaker If you have a large matrix, different rows/columns may occupy different cache lines/pages. In this case, you'd want to iterate over elements in such a way that you access adjacent elements after each other. Otherwise, it can lead to every element access becoming a cache miss, which completely destroys performance. – Agentlien May 24 '13 at 14:44
  • 9
    @beaker: it has to do with caching at CPU level (supposing that the matrix is a single big blob of memory), the cache lines are then effective lines of the matrix, and the prefetcher may fetch the next few lines. If you switch access, the CPU cache/prefetcher still work line by line whilst you access column by column, the performance drop can be dramatic. – Matthieu M. May 24 '13 at 14:47
  • 2
    @taocp Basically, you would need some sort of flag to indicate it is transposed and then request for say (i,j) would be mapped to (j,i) – Shafik Yaghmour May 24 '13 at 15:02
5

Some details about transposing 4x4 square float (I will discuss 32-bit integer later) matrices with x86 hardware. It's helpful to start here in order to transpose larger square matrices such as 8x8 or 16x16.

_MM_TRANSPOSE4_PS(r0, r1, r2, r3) is implemented differently by different compilers. GCC and ICC (I have not checked Clang) use unpcklps, unpckhps, unpcklpd, unpckhpd whereas MSVC uses only shufps. We can actually combine these two approaches together like this.

t0 = _mm_unpacklo_ps(r0, r1);
t1 = _mm_unpackhi_ps(r0, r1);
t2 = _mm_unpacklo_ps(r2, r3);
t3 = _mm_unpackhi_ps(r2, r3);

r0 = _mm_shuffle_ps(t0,t2, 0x44);
r1 = _mm_shuffle_ps(t0,t2, 0xEE);
r2 = _mm_shuffle_ps(t1,t3, 0x44);
r3 = _mm_shuffle_ps(t1,t3, 0xEE);

One interesting observation is that two shuffles can be converted to one shuffle and two blends (SSE4.1) like this.

t0 = _mm_unpacklo_ps(r0, r1);
t1 = _mm_unpackhi_ps(r0, r1);
t2 = _mm_unpacklo_ps(r2, r3);
t3 = _mm_unpackhi_ps(r2, r3);

v  = _mm_shuffle_ps(t0,t2, 0x4E);
r0 = _mm_blend_ps(t0,v, 0xC);
r1 = _mm_blend_ps(t2,v, 0x3);
v  = _mm_shuffle_ps(t1,t3, 0x4E);
r2 = _mm_blend_ps(t1,v, 0xC);
r3 = _mm_blend_ps(t3,v, 0x3);

This effectively converted 4 shuffles into 2 shuffles and 4 blends. This uses 2 more instructions than the implementation of GCC, ICC, and MSVC. The advantage is that it reduces port pressure which may have a benefit in some circumstances. Currently all the shuffles and unpacks can go only to one particular port whereas the blends can go to either of two different ports.

I tried using 8 shuffles like MSVC and converting that into 4 shuffles + 8 blends but it did not work. I still had to use 4 unpacks.

I used this same technique for a 8x8 float transpose (see towards the end of that answer). https://stackoverflow.com/a/25627536/2542702. In that answer I still had to use 8 unpacks but I manged to convert the 8 shuffles into 4 shuffles and 8 blends.

For 32-bit integers there is nothing like shufps (except for 128-bit shuffles with AVX512) so it can only be implemented with unpacks which I don't think can be convert to blends (efficiently). With AVX512 vshufi32x4 acts effectively like shufps except for 128-bit lanes of 4 integers instead of 32-bit floats so this same technique might be possibly with vshufi32x4 in some cases. With Knights Landing shuffles are four times slower (throughput) than blends.

  • 1
    You can use shufps on integer data. If you're doing a lot of shuffling, it might be worth it to do it all in the FP domain for shufps + blendps, especially if you don't have the equally-efficient AVX2 vpblendd available. Also, on Intel SnB-family hardware, there's no extra bypass delay for usingshufps between integer instructions like paddd. (There is a bypass delay for mixing blendps with paddd, according to Agner Fog's SnB testing, though.) – Peter Cordes Dec 29 '16 at 0:49
  • @PeterCordes, I need to review domain changes again. Is there some table (maybe an answer on SO) that summaries the domain change penalty for Core2-Skylake? In any case I have given more thought to this. I see now why wim and you kept mentioning vinsertf64x4 in my 16x16 transpose answer instead of vinserti64x4. If I am reading then writing the matrix then it certainly does not matter if I use the floating point domain or integer domain since the transpose is just moving data. – Z boson Dec 30 '16 at 9:02
  • 1
    Agner's tables list domains per-instruction for Core2 and Nehalem (and AMD I think), but not SnB-family. Agner's microarch guide just has a paragraph saying that it's down to 1c and often 0 on SnB, with some examples. Intel's optimization manual has a table I think, but I haven't tried to grok it so I don't remember how much detail it has. I do recall it not being totally obvious what category a given instruction would be in. – Peter Cordes Dec 30 '16 at 9:05
  • Even if you aren't just writing back to memory, it's only 1 extra clock for the whole transpose. The extra delay for each operand can be happening in parallel (or staggered fashion) as the consumer of the transpose starts to read registers written by shuffles or blends. Out-of-order execution allows the first few FMAs or whatever to start while the last few shuffles are finishing, but there's no chain of dypass delays, just an extra at most one. – Peter Cordes Dec 30 '16 at 9:07
  • 1
    Nicw answer! The intel 64-ia-32-architectures-optimization-manual, table 2-3, lists bypass delays for Skylake, maybe that is of interest to you. Table 2-8 for Haswell looks quite different. – wim Dec 30 '16 at 9:58
1
template <class T>
void transpose( std::vector< std::vector<T> > a,
std::vector< std::vector<T> > b,
int width, int height)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < width; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < height; j++)
        {
            b[j][i] = a[i][j];
        }
    }
} 
  • 1
    I'd rather think it would be faster if you exchange the two loops, due to a smaller cache miss penalty at writing than reading. – phoeagon May 24 '13 at 15:31
  • 5
    This only works for a square matrix. A rectangular matrix is a whole different problem! – NealB May 24 '13 at 15:39
  • 2
    The question asks for the fastest way. This is just a way. What makes you think it is fast, let alone fastest? For large matrices, this will thrash cache and have terrible performance. – Eric Postpischil May 24 '13 at 21:08
  • @NealB: How do you figure that? – Eric Postpischil May 24 '13 at 21:11
1

Consider each row as a column, and each column as a row .. use j,i instead of i,j

demo: http://ideone.com/lvsxKZ

#include <iostream> 
using namespace std;

int main ()
{
    char A [3][3] =
    {
        { 'a', 'b', 'c' },
        { 'd', 'e', 'f' },
        { 'g', 'h', 'i' }
    };

    cout << "A = " << endl << endl;

    // print matrix A
    for (int i=0; i<3; i++)
    {
        for (int j=0; j<3; j++) cout << A[i][j];
        cout << endl;
    }

    cout << endl << "A transpose = " << endl << endl;

    // print A transpose
    for (int i=0; i<3; i++)
    {
        for (int j=0; j<3; j++) cout << A[j][i];
        cout << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}
1

transposing without any overhead (class not complete):

class Matrix{
   double *data; //suppose this will point to data
   double _get1(int i, int j){return data[i*M+j];} //used to access normally
   double _get2(int i, int j){return data[j*N+i];} //used when transposed

   public:
   int M, N; //dimensions
   double (*get_p)(int, int); //functor to access elements  
   Matrix(int _M,int _N):M(_M), N(_N){
     //allocate data
     get_p=&Matrix::_get1; // initialised with normal access 
     }

   double get(int i, int j){
     //there should be a way to directly use get_p to call. but i think even this
     //doesnt incur overhead because it is inline and the compiler should be intelligent
     //enough to remove the extra call
     return (this->*get_p)(i,j);
    }
   void transpose(){ //twice transpose gives the original
     if(get_p==&Matrix::get1) get_p=&Matrix::_get2;
     else get_p==&Matrix::_get1; 
     swap(M,N);
     }
}

can be used like this:

Matrix M(100,200);
double x=M.get(17,45);
M.transpose();
x=M.get(17,45); // = original M(45,17)

of course I didn't bother with the memory management here, which is crucial but different topic.

  • 4
    You have an overhead from your function pointer that has to be followed for each element access. – user877329 Aug 28 '14 at 9:51
0

If the size of the arrays are known prior then we could use the union to our help. Like this-

#include <bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;

union ua{
    int arr[2][3];
    int brr[3][2];
};

int main() {
    union ua uav;
    int karr[2][3] = {{1,2,3},{4,5,6}};
    memcpy(uav.arr,karr,sizeof(karr));
    for (int i=0;i<3;i++)
    {
        for (int j=0;j<2;j++)
            cout<<uav.brr[i][j]<<" ";
        cout<<'\n';
    }

    return 0;
}
0

Modern linear algebra libraries include optimized versions of the most common operations. Many of them include dynamic CPU dispatch, which chooses the best implementation for the hardware at program execution time (without compromising on portability).

This is commonly a better alternative to performing manual optimization of your functinos via vector extensions intrinsic functions. The latter will tie your implementation to a particular hardware vendor and model: if you decide to swap to a different vendor (e.g. Power, ARM) or to a newer vector extensions (e.g. AVX512), you will need to re-implement it again to get the most of them.

MKL transposition, for example, includes the BLAS extensions function imatcopy. You can find it in other implementations such as OpenBLAS as well:

#include <mkl.h>

void transpose( float* a, int n, int m ) {
    const char row_major = 'R';
    const char transpose = 'T';
    const float alpha = 1.0f;
    mkl_simatcopy (row_major, transpose, n, m, alpha, a, n, n);
}

For a C++ project, you can make use of the Armadillo C++:

#include <armadillo>

void transpose( arma::mat &matrix ) {
    arma::inplace_trans(matrix);
}
0

intel mkl suggests in-place and out-of-place transposition/copying matrices. here is the link to the documentation. I would recommend trying out of place implementation as faster ten in-place and into the documentation of the latest version of mkl contains some mistakes.

-1

I think that most fast way should not taking higher than O(n^2) also in this way you can use just O(1) space :
the way to do that is to swap in pairs because when you transpose a matrix then what you do is: M[i][j]=M[j][i] , so store M[i][j] in temp, then M[i][j]=M[j][i],and the last step : M[j][i]=temp. this could be done by one pass so it should take O(n^2)

  • 2
    M[i][j]=M[j][i] will only work if it were to be square matrix; else it would throw an index exception. – Antony Thomas Mar 16 '15 at 0:30
-6

my answer is transposed of 3x3 matrix

 #include<iostream.h>

#include<math.h>


main()
{
int a[3][3];
int b[3];
cout<<"You must give us an array 3x3 and then we will give you Transposed it "<<endl;
for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
{
    for(int j=0;j<3;j++)
{
cout<<"Enter a["<<i<<"]["<<j<<"]: ";

cin>>a[i][j];

}

}
cout<<"Matrix you entered is :"<<endl;

 for (int e = 0 ; e < 3 ; e++ )

{
    for ( int f = 0 ; f < 3 ; f++ )

        cout << a[e][f] << "\t";


    cout << endl;

    }

 cout<<"\nTransposed of matrix you entered is :"<<endl;
 for (int c = 0 ; c < 3 ; c++ )
{
    for ( int d = 0 ; d < 3 ; d++ )
        cout << a[d][c] << "\t";

    cout << endl;
    }

return 0;
}

protected by Shafik Yaghmour Jul 18 '14 at 3:09

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