32

I'm using Yeoman and generator-angular to manage AngularJS apps, but I'm having trouble with automated testing.

Running grunt test will run unit tests once. I can get E2E tests to run after unit tests by altering the karma config block in Gruntfile.js, adding e2e:

karma: {
  //...
  e2e: {
    configFile: 'karma-e2e.conf.js',
    singleRun: true
  }
},

Great: now when I type grunt test all tests are run. But they're only run one time, and there's a big overhead (starting compass, running the server, launching the Chrome processes, etc.). Instead, the server and Chrome processes should remain running and, when I save a test, tests should be re-run.

I can achieve this by modifying both karma.conf.js and karma-e2e.conf.js and setting singleRun = true, then running karma start in one terminal pane, and karma start karma-e2e.conf.js in another. Provided none of the ports in the karma configs conflict (which they do by default), this works. Now I'm bypassing Grunt and just doing my own thing (which seems a little silly, as Grunt is supposed to make things easier).

Anyway, after a few more changes (fixes?) — not detailed for brevity — this works but doesn't cut it: I now have to run two different commands and keep an eye on two different terminal panes. Surely there's a better way.

How can I run a single command to watch my test files and re-run tests appropriately?

Bonus question: why on Earth is this functionality not provided as is? Is it just a question of the developer(s) of generator-angular not having enough time to implement this stuff? I ask because I'm only just getting into Angular/Yeoman/Karma (as you probably noticed), and feel that automated testing of both E2E and unit tests are crucial to workflow.

4
  • The cleanest solution I've so far come up with is using Node Foreman to launch two instances of karma in the same window. This approach is used by Year of Moo. I have a feeling the best solution may involve something like this, but I'm still left perplexed as to why this is not included with the angular generator. May 27 '13 at 11:48
  • 1
    Both of these types of tests provide an html reporter too right? Assuming thats true you could create a simple web page with two iframes containing each test report. Then a batch program could run both types of tests, launch the browser, and point it to the web page you created. These two types of tests use entirely different test runners (jasmine and angular-scenario) so it makes sense that karma cannot run both at the same time out of the box. I agree though, that the functionality should be provided. May 31 '13 at 0:30
  • @robbymurphy That's a good idea! I'm not sure how I'd go about implementing this, though, and whether or not it's actually possible (although it sounds like it should be). Additionally, node foreman is a fairly quick solution, so I'm not sure if the gain would be worth the extra configuration. May 31 '13 at 5:45
  • 1
    I would suggest trying PhantomJS instead of Chrome, saves opening a window.
    – Terry
    Jun 4 '13 at 2:43
7

As I mentioned in a comment to your question - PhantomJS saves a lot of hassle. That aside, I believe you can handle everything from within your Gruntfile and just continue to run grunt test to start the whole thing.

grunt-karma allows full customization of your karma options with some handy add-ons.

From the docs:

....

You can override any of the config file's settings directly:

karma: {   
  unit: {
    configFile: 'karma.conf.js',
    runnerPort: 9999,
    singleRun: true,
    browsers: ['PhantomJS']   
  }
}

Sharing Configs

If you have multiple targets, it may be helpful to share common configuration settings between them. Grunt-karma supports this by using the options property:

karma: {
  options: {
    configFile: 'karma.conf.js',
    runnerPort: 9999,
    browsers: ['Chrome', 'Firefox']
  },
  continuous: {
    singleRun: true
    browsers: ['PhantomJS']
  },
  dev: {
    reporters: 'dots'
  }
}

Additionally you may want to snoop around in Yeoman's generator-angular Gruntfile code to see what else may be available or at least mockable.

2
  • I've since moved away from Angular, so I can't confirm that this solves the problem. It does look like shared configs are the way to go, so I'll accept this. Jun 27 '13 at 11:00
  • How would the config look like if you have both e2e and unit tests and want them to have different configs for dev and build ? e.g. when using both e2e and unit in dev you want to use Chrome and have karma listen to file changes without browser restart and at the build time you want to use PhantomJS and singleRun:true
    – Igor Malyk
    Oct 14 '13 at 10:24
0

You can try this to run only e2e tests

grunt karma:e2e
1
  • this is giving me this error INFO [PhantomJS 1.9.2 (Mac OS X)]: Connected on socket iFpamoP1eO3ongWLY4Xi PhantomJS 1.9.2 (Mac OS X): Executed 0 of 0 ERROR (0.356 secs / 0 secs)
    – climboid
    Dec 6 '13 at 19:30
0

Within the karma.conf.js file (approx line:38) find autoWatch = false; and change it to true.

Now if you run grunt karma:unit you will find that it leaves the test server running and any changes to project files immediately run the tests again.

-2
//
// test/midway/appSpec.js
//
describe("Midway: Testing Modules", function() {
  describe("App Module:", function() {

    var module;
    before(function() {
      module = angular.module("App");
    });

    it("should be registered", function() {
      expect(module).not.to.equal(null);
    });

    describe("Dependencies:", function() {

      var deps;
      var hasModule = function(m) {
        return deps.indexOf(m) >= 0;
      };
      before(function() {
        deps = module.value('appName').requires;
      });

      //you can also test the module's dependencies
      it("should have App.Controllers as a dependency", function() {
        expect(hasModule('App.Controllers')).to.equal(true);
      });

      it("should have App.Directives as a dependency", function() {
        expect(hasModule('App.Directives')).to.equal(true);
      });

      it("should have App.Filters as a dependency", function() {
        expect(hasModule('App.Filters')).to.equal(true);
      });

      it("should have App.Routes as a dependency", function() {
        expect(hasModule('App.Routes')).to.equal(true);
      });

      it("should have App.Services as a dependency", function() {
        expect(hasModule('App.Services')).to.equal(true);
      });
    });
  });
});
1
  • Midway testing isn't the issue here, though it would mean yet another test suite to run. Jun 7 '13 at 8:58

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