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Does this question even make sense?

SFML 2.0 has added a feature whereby you can specify an OpenGL version to use. Is there a terminal command I can run (or otherwise) to find out what version I should be using?

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  • How do you define "should be using"? – Nicol Bolas May 24 '13 at 17:36
  • No idea, I'm not an expert but @MattPhillips fixed this issue for me. – FreelanceConsultant May 24 '13 at 17:38
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    @EdwardBird: Then your question is poorly phrased. If you wanted to know what the highest version of OpenGL supported by a system is, you should have asked for that. So fix your question. – Nicol Bolas May 24 '13 at 17:51
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To know your OpenGL version in Ubuntu,

Install Glxinfo

$sudo apt-get install mesa-utils

To Check OpenGL Version,

$glxinfo | grep "OpenGL version"

You will get the output as follows,

glxinfo | grep "OpenGL version"
OpenGL version string: 1.4 (2.1 Mesa 7.7.1)

Reference: https://askubuntu.com/questions/47062/what-is-terminal-command-that-can-show-opengl-version

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There is no "should be using". The version you "should" be using is the minimum version that you want to support. What version that is depends on what hardware you want your program to execute on. If the hardware can't support that version, then your code simply won't run on it. And if you want your code to run on lower versions, then you should have asked for that version and written your application against that lower version.

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  • Well GTX 670MX supports 4.1, but clearly the information you give is not correct, because running SFML with version 3.2 specified causes problems. – FreelanceConsultant May 24 '13 at 17:40
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    @EdwardBird: What kind of problems? Nicol Bolas is right, and whatever's broken, it should not be due to a higher version being supported than what's requested. – datenwolf May 24 '13 at 17:46

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