4

I don't understand the difference between the ways of declaring functions on jQuery, and some times I lost some time trying to call a function and it does not work properly because it does not exist in a context. I don't even know if this is different ways of declaring functions on jQuery or if there is other way. Could someone here explain me? I'm totally noob.

    $(function () {
        // Your code
    })

    jQuery(function($) {
        // Your code
    });

    function () {
        // Your code
    }
  • don't forget $.fn.openACSelect = function() {}; which allows you to define your own jQuery methods. – km6zla May 24 '13 at 20:42
8
$(function() { })

...is exactly equivalent to...

$(document).ready(function() {
});

This will fire the function the moment the DOM is ready (DOMReady event).

jQuery(function($) {
});

Is the same thing. In most set-ups, $ := jQuery (only exception is in the case of a NoConflict environment). The first parameter of the closure you're passing to jQuery will return the jQuery object. So, this function simply re-maps $ to jQuery in addition to performing exactly what the other did.

The third statement is a simple function declaration, which has nothing to do with jQuery.

| improve this answer | |
7

NOTICE: This is indeed too long, but I hope someone finds it helpful.

For starters: $ (or jQuery, they're usually the same thing) is a function. On your first two examples, you're calling that function, passing it a reference to an anonymous function. That's a jQuery shortcut to add the passed function as a "document.ready" event listener (the actual event name is DOMContentLoaded in compliant browsers).

JavaScript has three ways to create functions:

1. Function declaration

function foo() {
    // code
}

In a declaration, the function must always be named. In this case, the function name is "foo".

2. Function expression

Can be named or not. Usually, they're anonymous. They will be considered invalid syntax depending on the position they appear in the code. For example, this is a syntax error:

// syntax error
function() {
    // code
}

But this is not:

// passing a function expression is fine
foo(function() {
    // code
});

This is also valid:

// parentheses make it an expression too
(function() {
    // code
});

This too:

// the negation operator also makes it be interpreted as an
// expression, instead of a syntax error
!function() {
    // code
}

The two former examples are usually used to immediately invoke a function:

!function() {
    alert('invoked')
}();

(function() {
    alert('invoked')
}());

Isolated, without the calling parentheses, they're pretty much useless, as the references to the newly created function are immediately lost if we don't assign it to anything.

This on the other hand is very useful:

// function expressions are fine on the right-hand-side of an assignment
var fn = function() {
    // code
}

3. Using the Function constructor

// This is similar to 'eval'
// the string you pass will be the body of the function
var fn = new Function("return true");

You also said you are confused about functions and variables that don't exist in a certain context. That's because of scope: in JavaScript, every function creates a new scope. If you create a variable (declared with var) or another function (using any of the valid variations above), that variable or function will not be visible outside of the function it was declared at. But they will be visible inside other nested functions defined at the same scope (nested functions "close over" they're outer scope, and therefore are commonly called "closures").

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  • Two small corrections: !function() {} and (function(){}) are merely declarations, and the first does not serve a purpose as not executable at all (you lose the reference the moment you create it due to the unary operator). !(function(){})() is nice, though. Fiddle: tinker.io/57c3d/1 – Sébastien Renauld May 24 '13 at 20:59
  • @SébastienRenauld - !function(){alert("!");}() – Travis J May 24 '13 at 21:00
  • @TravisJ: I know this, and this is the point of my second statement. I'm just saying that the two behave differently: var k = (function(){}); k(); will work. var k = !function() {}; k() will not. – Sébastien Renauld May 24 '13 at 21:01
  • @SébastienRenauld - Fair enough. But that is because the expression evaluates to a truthy value in the second case, so hopefully no one tries that expecting to execute a function :) – Travis J May 24 '13 at 21:02
  • @TravisJ: the point was an aside, not a correction to the answer. It could be misleading to see both put side by side without the IETF ()s, and could lead people to think that they are analogous. That's all. – Sébastien Renauld May 24 '13 at 21:03
3

Remember that characters in javascript can be variable names. So in jQuery's source there is something similar to this definition:

var $ = jQuery = windw.jQuery;

Where all of those are the same variable. I point that out because $() and jQuery() are both the same thing.


This is actually a shortcut for jQuery.ready() where the argument passed is a callback for when the document has loaded according to jQuery. When you place function(){} as the argument, you are creating an anonymous function, and that is what gets executed when the callback is called.

$(function () {//passing anonymous function
    // Your code
})

This is actually not valid code because it must have a name. It will throw the exception "SyntaxError: Unexpected token (".

function () {
    // Your code
}
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2

The third one is a function declaration, which serves to nothing as the function as no name and isn't called, while the two first ones are equivalent ($ is an alias for jQuery) ways of asking jQuery to call the function when the DOM is ready. It's also equivalent to

$(document).ready(function(){
})

See http://api.jquery.com/ready/

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  • 1
    To me #3 is an anonymous function expression (or a syntax error) – bfavaretto May 24 '13 at 20:38
  • Without the parenthesis to make it an expression, and if it's not assigned, I think it so useless it doesn't even deserve a name. – Denys Séguret May 24 '13 at 20:39
  • @bfavaretto: it'd be an IETF if it was (function(){})(). As it stands, it is just a function declaration. – Sébastien Renauld May 24 '13 at 20:41
  • @SébastienRenauld No, declarations must be named. – bfavaretto May 24 '13 at 20:45
  • @bfavaretto: Yup. Therefore, his third declaration throws a parse error. Outside of its context, it could be an anonymous function, an IETF, or a function decl based on the presence of a var assignment or a double set of brackets. – Sébastien Renauld May 24 '13 at 20:47
2

The first two ways of calling function , are a shortcut to $(document).ready() function. That means that if you call theme inside that $ or jQuery they will execute like that. Refer to http://api.jquery.com/ready/ ! The third one refers to a normal function calling. The difference beetwen using $ or jQuery is for conflict stuff with other libraries.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Third one is not an anonymous function calling. – Sébastien Renauld May 24 '13 at 20:46
1

In JavaScript, you can pass functions to other functions. When you see something like

$('div').click(function() {
    alert("clicked");
});

you're passing an anonymous function as an argument to the click() method which simply executes the function you give it.

As such, you could achieve the same result with

function runOnClick() { alert("clicked"); }

$('div').click(runOnClick);
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0

jQuery is not a programming language. It's a library written in JavaScript for Javascript. The rules of declaring a function in JavaScript are the only ones you need to follow. jQuery does not provide any new way to define functions.

These are not valid function definitions:

$(function () {
    // Your code
})

jQuery(function($) {
    // Your code
});

This is a valid function definition:

function myFavoriteFunction() {
    // Your code
}
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