5

What is the most efficient way for repeating a vector?

I'm currently under the impression that repmat is superior to any other methods? Or am I horribly wrong with this mindset?

Would it be possible to produce the exact same result as repmat does, using a different technique? Perhaps ordinary matrix multiplication?

I would like to express my greatest gratitude for all your interest and supportive answers!

AER

3 Answers 3

6

The bottom line, bsxfun is faster than the two you asked for if the start vector is long or the # of repeats is big enough (see below), otherwise matrix multiplication is more efficient. Between the two you've asked it looks like matrix multiplication+reshape wins in efficiency by a factor of ~3 over repmat. I've used timeit the following way, I've created a random vector of 1e5 elements and checked how long it takes to create 100 repeats of it:

v=rand(1e5,1);
f1=@()repmat(v,[100,1])
f2=@() reshape(v*ones(1,100),[],1);

timeit(f1)
ans =
     0.1675

timeit(f2)
ans =
    0.0516

however bsxfun is even faster:

f3=@() reshape(bsxfun(@times,v,ones(1,100)),[],1) 

timeit(f3)

 ans =
     0.0374

Here's a more careful study of this observation:

Given a vector is 1000 elements long, repeating it 10 to 1e5 times yield the following performance times:

enter image description here

For smaller # of repeats there is little difference between bsxfun and matrix multiplication but as the # of repeats passes ~1e3, bsxfun wins clearly.

However, taking a mere 10 elements long vector with the same range of repeats, shows that matrix multiplication is more efficient. bsxfun starts to be better only after 10^5 repeats, but even then it is only ~5% faster (not shown) :

enter image description here

so it depends really what you're after. Further discussion is found in Loren on the Art of MATLAB blog.

0

No, currently repmat mostly is slower than plain indexing, which works as follows:

Classis repmat:

a = [ 1 2 3 ];
repmat(a,4,1)
>> 
     [1 2 3;
      1 2 3;
      1 2 3;
      1 2 3];

indexing version of this:

a(ones(4,1),:);

which gives just the same result.

0

it really depends what sort of verctor you want. for example if you want a a specialized vector such as row of ones, then

tic
repmat([1],3,5)
toc

tic
ones(3,5)
toc

will tell you that using "ones" is about 3 times faster (at least on my machine). You can always use tic and toc to measure which method is faster. Lets try another one...

tic
repmat([1,2,3],1,2)
toc

tic
cat(2,[1,2,3],[1,2,3]) 
toc

now cat is 3 times faster again but it has its own obvious limitation. Hope this helps

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.