6

I have a very large n*m matrix S. I want to efficiently determine whether there exists a submatrix F inside of S. The large matrix S can have a size as big as 500*500.

To clarify, consider the following:

S = 1 2 3 
    4 5 6
    7 8 9

F1 = 2 3 
     5 6

F2 = 1 2 
     4 6

In such a case:

  • F1 is inside S
  • F2 is not inside S

Each element in the matrix is a 32-bit integer. I can only think of using a brute-force approach to find whether F is a submatrix of S. I googled to find an effective algorithm, but I can't find anything.

Is there some algorithm or principle to do it faster? (Or possibly some method to optimize the brute force approach?)

PS the statistics data

A total of 8 S
On average, each S will be matched against about 44 F.
The probability of success match (i.e. F appears in a S) is 
19%.
  • In your example, would the matrix [1,3;7,9] (i.e. just the corners) be considered to be inside S? – Peter de Rivaz May 25 '13 at 14:58
  • No,it have to be gather in a matrix – Jason May 25 '13 at 14:59
  • The matrix should be continuous and gathered. – Jason May 25 '13 at 19:40
1

If you want to query multiple times for a same big matrix and same size submatrices. There are many solutions to preprocess the big matrix.

A similar ( or even same ) problem is here.

Fastest way to Find a m x n submatrix in M X N matrix

| improve this answer | |
1

It involves preprocessing the matrix. This will be heavy on memory, but it should be better in terms of computation time.

  • Check if the size of the sub-matrix is less than that of the matrix before you do the check.
  • While constructing the matrix, build a construct that maps a value in the matrix to an array of (x,y) positions in the matrix. This will allow you to check for the existence of a sub-matrix where candidates could exist. You would use the value at (0,0) in the sub-matrix and get the possible positions of this value in the larger matrix. If the list of positions is empty, you have no candidates, and so, the sub-matrix does not exist. There's a start (More experienced people might consider this a naive approach however).
| improve this answer | |
1

Since you only want to know whether a given matrix is inside another big matrix. If you know how to use Matlab code from C++, you may directly use ismember from Matlab. Another way may be try to figure out how ismember works in Matlab, then implement the same thing in C++.

See Find location of submatrix

| improve this answer | |
1

Since you have tagged the question as C++ also, I am providing this code. This is a brute force technique and definitely not the ideal solution for this problem. For an S X T Main Matrix and a M X N Sub Matrix, the time complexity of the algorithm is O(STMN).

cout<<"\nEnter the order of the Main Matrix";
cin>>S>>T;
cout<<"\nEnter the order of the Sub Matrix";
cin>>M>>N;

// Read the Main Matrix into MAT[S][T]

// Read the Sub Matrix into SUB[M][N]

for(i=0; i<(S-M); i++)
{
   for(j=0; j<(T-N); j++)
   {
      flag=0;
      for(p=0; p<M; p++)
      {
         for(q=0; q<N; q++)
         {
            if(MAT[i+p][j+q] != SUB[p][q])
            {
               flag=1;
               break; 
            }
         }
         if(flag==0)
         {
            cout<<"Match Found in the Main Matrix at starting location "<<(i+1) <<"X"<<(j+1);
            break;
         }
      }
      if(flag==0)
      {
         break;
      }
   }            
   if(flag==0)
   {
      break;
   }
} 
| improve this answer | |
1

Modified Code of deepu-benson

int Ma[][5]= {
        {0, 0, 1, 0, 0},
        {0, 0, 1, 0, 0},
        {0, 1, 0, 0, 0},
        {0, 1, 0, 0, 0},
        {1, 1, 1, 1, 0}
    };


    int Su[][3]= {
        {1, 0, 0},
        {1, 0, 0},


    };

    int S = 5;// Size of main matrix row
    int T = 5;//Size of main matrix column
    int M = 2; // size of desire matrix row
    int N = 3; // Size of desire matrix column

int flag, i,j,p,q;

for(i=0; i<=(S-M); i++)
{
   for(j=0; j<=(T-N); j++)
   {
      flag=0;
      for(p=0; p<M; p++)
      {
         for(int q=0; q<N; q++)
         {
            if(Ma[i+p][j+q] != Su[p][q])
            {
               flag=1;

               break;
            }
         }
      }
      if(flag==0)
      {
           printf("Match Found in the Main Matrix at starting location %d, %d",(i+1) ,(j+1));
         break;
      }
   }
   if(flag==0)
   {
        printf("Match Found in the Main Matrix at starting location %d, %d",(i+1) ,(j+1));
      break;
   }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Hi, I have one Matrix as 20*20 The other is 3*3, But the result is wrong, by using the above code. May I know that is there any limitation with code? – bob90937 Feb 5 '18 at 14:53
  • @bob90937 as such I did not test for high order matrix so I donot not limitation of this code – Singhak Feb 6 '18 at 10:35
0

Much of the answer depends on what you're doing repetitively. Are you testing a bunch of huge matrices for the same submatrix? Are you testing one huge matrix looking for a bunch of different submatrices?

Do any of the matrices have repetitive patterns, or are they nice and random, or can you make no assumptions about the data?

Also, does the submatrix have to be contiguous? Does S contain

F3 = 1 3
     7 9
| improve this answer | |
  • The matrix should be continuous and gathered and the other info I have add it in the bottom of the problem. – Jason May 25 '13 at 19:41
0

If the data in matrix isn't randomly distributed, it would be helpful to run some statistical analysis on it. Then you could find the sub matrix by comparing its element ranged by their inverse probability. It could be faster, then a plain bruteforce.

Say, you have the matrix of some normally distributed integers with the Gaussian center in 0. And you want to find submatrix say:

1 3 -12
-3 43 -1
198 2 2

You have to start searching for 198, then checking upper right element to be 43 then its upper right for -12, then any 3 or -3 will do; and so on. This would greatly reduce the number of comparisons comparing to the most brutal solution.

| improve this answer | |
0

My original answer is below the break, thinking about it there are several optimisations, these optimisations refer to the steps of the original answer.

For Step B) do not search the entirety of S: you can discount all columns and rows which would not allow F to fit. (in the below example, only search the upper left 2x2 matrix). In cases where F is a significant proportion of S this would save considerable time.

If the range of values within S is quite low then creating a lookup table would greatly reduce the time required for step B).


Working with these 2 matrices

findmat2 inside mat1

A) Select one value from the smaller matrix:

mat4

B) locate it within the larger

mat3

C) Check the adjacent cells to see if they match

mat6 - mat5

| improve this answer | |
  • He's dealing with a 500*500 matrix however. – user123 May 25 '13 at 17:21
0

It's possible to do in O(N*M*(logN+logM)).

Equality can be expressed as sum of squared differences is 0:

sum[i,j](square(S(n+i,m+j)-F(i,j)))=0
sum[i,j]square(S(n+i,m+j))+sum[i,j](square(F(i,j))-2*sum[i,j](S(n+i,m+j)*F(i,j))=0

First part can be calculated for all (n,m) in O(N*M) similarly to running average.

Second part is calculated as usual in O(sizeof(F)) which is less than O(N*M).

Third part is the most interesting. It's convolution which can be calculated in O(N*M*(logN+logM)) using Fast Fourier Transform: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convolution#Fast_convolution_algorithms

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.