2

In the grammar below, I am trying configure any line that starts with ' as a single line comment and anything betweeen /' Multiline Comment '/. The single line comment works ok. But for some reason as soon as I press / or ' or ';' or < or '>' I get the error below. I don't have above characters configured. Shouldn't they be considered default and skip parsing ?

Error

Lexical error at line 0, column 0.  Encountered: "\"" (34), after : ""
Lexical error at line 0, column 0.  Encountered: ">" (62), after : ""
Lexical error at line 0, column 0.  Encountered: "\n" (10), after : "-"

I have only included part of the code below for conciseness. For full Lexer definition please visit the link

TOKEN :
{
  < WHITESPACE:
  " "
| "\t"
| "\n"
| "\r"
| "\f">
}

/* COMMENTS */

MORE :
{
  <"/'"> { input_stream.backup(1); } : IN_MULTI_LINE_COMMENT
}

<IN_MULTI_LINE_COMMENT>
TOKEN :
{
  <MULTI_LINE_COMMENT: "'/" > : DEFAULT
}

<IN_MULTI_LINE_COMMENT>
MORE :
{
  < ~[] >
}

TOKEN :
{
  <SINGLE_LINE_COMMENT: "'" (~["\n", "\r"])* ("\n" | "\r" | "\r\n")?>
}
3

I can't reproduce every aspect of your problem. You say there is an error "as soon as" you enter certain characters. Here is what I get.

  • / There is no error unless the next character is not a '. If the next character is not ', there is an error.
  • ' I see no error. This is correctly treated as the start of comment
  • ; There is always an error. No token can start with ;.
  • < There only an error if the next characters are not - or <-.
  • > There always is an error. No token can start with >

I'm not exactly sure why you would expect these not to be errors, since your lexer has no rules to cover these cases. Generally when there is no rule to match a prefix of the input and the input is not exhausted, there will be a TokenMgrError thrown.

If you want to eliminate all these TokenMgrErrors, make a catch-all rule (as explained in the FAQ):

TOKEN: { <UNEXPECTED_CHARACTER: ~[] > }

Make sure this is the very last rule in the .jj file. This rule says that, when no other rule applies, the next character is treated as an UNEXPECTED_CHARACTER token. Of course this just boots the problem up to the parsing level. If you really want the tokenizer to skip all characters that don't belong, just use the following rule as the very last rule:

SKIP : { < ~[] > }

For most languages, that would be an odd thing to do, which is why it is not the default.

  • One of the things I tried yesterday includes TOKEN: { <OTHER: ~[] > } which didn't work probably because of other reasons. I said as soon as I enter because I am developing this lexer to provide syntax higlighting in an IDE. I don't have plans to implement a parser yet, so if I just skip the characters that don't belong to the language, that should suffice. I spent all day yesterday trying to fix this and was able to fix it this morning in one shot after seeing your answer. I suppose they call you a scientist for a reason :). Answers like these should be awarded 100 points atleast. THX. – ShaggyInjun May 26 '13 at 19:51
  • Thanks. You had the solution all along. Good luck with the project. – Theodore Norvell May 27 '13 at 0:23

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