295

I'm trying to find out if a row exists in a table. Using MySQL, is it better to do a query like this:

SELECT COUNT(*) AS total FROM table1 WHERE ...

and check to see if the total is non-zero or is it better to do a query like this:

SELECT * FROM table1 WHERE ... LIMIT 1

and check to see if any rows were returned?

In both queries, the WHERE clause uses an index.

12 Answers 12

419

You could also try using

SELECT EXISTS(SELECT * FROM table1 WHERE ...)

per the documentation

Per a comment below:

SELECT EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM table1 WHERE ...)
  • 27
    Test with ...EXISTS( SELECT 1/0 FROM someothertable). For SQL Server & Oracle - it makes no difference to use *, 1 or NULL because EXISTS only tests for a boolean based on 1+ of the WHERE criteria matching. – OMG Ponies Nov 4 '09 at 23:28
  • 73
    Guys, it says right in the documentation linked to in this answer, 2nd paragraph, "Traditionally, an EXISTS subquery starts with SELECT *, but it could begin with SELECT 5 or SELECT column1 or anything at all. MySQL ignores the SELECT list in such a subquery, so it makes no difference." – mpen Feb 11 '12 at 0:39
  • 9
    @ChrisThompson : what happens when the statement is executed? I mean what does the result set contain? – Ashwin Nov 4 '12 at 11:37
  • 10
    @Ashwin, it contains whether a 0 (not exists) or 1 (exists). – fedorqui Feb 7 '13 at 9:09
  • 8
    I think your query is superfluous, I tested, and this query SELECT 1 FROM table1 WHERE col = $var LIMIT 1 is more faster than your query. So what is the advantage of your query? – Shafizadeh Sep 28 '15 at 15:20
161

I have made some researches on this subject recently. The way to implement it has to be different if the field is a TEXT field, a non unique field.

I have made some tests with a TEXT field. Considering the fact that we have a table with 1M entries. 37 entries are equal to 'something':

  • SELECT * FROM test WHERE texte LIKE '%something%' LIMIT 1 with mysql_num_rows() : 0.039061069488525s. (FASTER)
  • SELECT count(*) as count FROM test WHERE text LIKE '%something% : 16.028197050095s.
  • SELECT EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM test WHERE text LIKE '%something%') : 0.87045907974243s.
  • SELECT EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM test WHERE text LIKE '%something%' LIMIT 1) : 0.044898986816406s.

But now, with a BIGINT PK field, only one entry is equal to '321321' :

  • SELECT * FROM test2 WHERE id ='321321' LIMIT 1 with mysql_num_rows() : 0.0089840888977051s.
  • SELECT count(*) as count FROM test2 WHERE id ='321321' : 0.00033879280090332s.
  • SELECT EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM test2 WHERE id ='321321') : 0.00023889541625977s.
  • SELECT EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM test2 WHERE id ='321321' LIMIT 1) : 0.00020313262939453s. (FASTER)
  • 1
    Thanks for the additional answer. Did you find the difference in time between the two fastest options for a TEXT field to be pretty consistent? The difference doesn't seem large, and using SELECT EXISTS(SELECT 1 ... LIMIT 1) seems to be pretty good in both cases. – Bernard Chen May 22 '12 at 7:15
  • 1
    You are right, the difference is not so important regarding the other results concerning the text field. Nevertheless, maybe the query would be better using SELECT 1 FROM test WHERE texte LIKE '%something%' LIMIT 1 – Laurent W. Jun 4 '12 at 20:08
  • I tried on mysql and in the case you use select 1 ... limit 1, it is useless to surround with select exists – Adrien Horgnies May 15 '16 at 9:57
  • 2
    @LittleNooby there is difference. SELECT EXISTS ... gives true and false value (1 or 0), while SELECT 1 ... gives either 1 or empty. There are subtle difference between false value and empty set, depending on your situation. – Quickpick May 17 '16 at 23:30
  • @LittleNooby makes an excellent point, that is easy to overlook. Missing in the timing tests above is SELECT 1 FROM test WHERE ..., without SELECT EXISTS around it. Presumably is a hair faster that way. – ToolmakerSteve Sep 2 '16 at 15:06
22

A short example of @ChrisThompson's answer

Example:

mysql> SELECT * FROM table_1;
+----+--------+
| id | col1   |
+----+--------+
|  1 | foo    |
|  2 | bar    |
|  3 | foobar |
+----+--------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> SELECT EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM table_1 WHERE id = 1);
+--------------------------------------------+
| EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM table_1 WHERE id = 1) |
+--------------------------------------------+
|                                          1 |
+--------------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> SELECT EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM table_1 WHERE id = 9);
+--------------------------------------------+
| EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM table_1 WHERE id = 9) |
+--------------------------------------------+
|                                          0 |
+--------------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

Using an alias:

mysql> SELECT EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM table_1 WHERE id = 1) AS mycheck;
+---------+
| mycheck |
+---------+
|       1 |
+---------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
7

In my research, I can find the result getting on following speed.

select * from table where condition=value
(1 total, Query took 0.0052 sec)

select exists(select * from table where condition=value)
(1 total, Query took 0.0008 sec)

select count(*) from table where condition=value limit 1) 
(1 total, Query took 0.0007 sec)

select exists(select * from table where condition=value limit 1)
(1 total, Query took 0.0006 sec) 
4

Suggest you not to use Count because count always makes extra loads for db use SELECT 1 and it returns 1 if your record right there otherwise it returns null and you can handle it.

4

I feel it is worth pointing out, although it was touched on in the comments, that in this situation:

SELECT 1 FROM my_table WHERE *indexed_condition* LIMIT 1

Is superior to:

SELECT * FROM my_table WHERE *indexed_condition* LIMIT 1

This is because the first query can be satisfied by the index, whereas the second requires a row look up (unless possibly all the table's columns are in the index used).

Adding the LIMIT clause allows the engine to stop after finding any row.

The first query should be comparable to:

SELECT EXISTS(SELECT * FROM my_table WHERE *indexed_condition*)

Which sends the same signals to the engine (1/* makes no difference here), but I'd still write the 1 to reinforce the habit when using EXISTS:

SELECT EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM my_table WHERE *indexed_condition*)

It may make sense to add the EXISTS wrapping is if you require an explicit return when no rows match.

2

At times it is quite handy to get the auto increment primary key (id) of the row if it exists and 0 if it doesn't.

Here's how this can be done in a single query:

SELECT IFNULL(`id`, COUNT(*)) FROM WHERE ...
  • Why not just use IFNULL(id, 0) here instead of the COUNT(*)? – Ethan Hohensee Aug 28 '17 at 18:35
0

I'd go with COUNT(1). It is faster than COUNT(*) because COUNT(*) tests to see if at least one column in that row is != NULL. You don't need that, especially because you already have a condition in place (the WHERE clause). COUNT(1) instead tests the validity of 1, which is always valid and takes a lot less time to test.

  • 8
    -1 This is wrong. COUNT(*) doesn't look at the column values - it just counts the number of rows. See my answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/2876909/… – Mark Byers May 28 '10 at 21:35
  • 6
    COUNT() is much slower than EXISTS as EXISTS can return when it first finds a row – Will Jun 21 '12 at 20:17
0

A COUNT query is faster, although maybe not noticeably, but as far as getting the desired result, both should be sufficient.

  • 4
    This is however DB specific. The COUNT(*) is known to be slow in PostgreSQL. Better would be to select the PK column and see if it returns any rows. – BalusC Nov 4 '09 at 21:05
  • 3
    COUNT(*) is slow in InnoDB though – Will Jun 21 '12 at 20:16
-1

For non-InnoDB tables you could also use the information schema tables:

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/tables-table.html

-1

Or you can insert raw sql part to conditions so I have 'conditions'=>array('Member.id NOT IN (SELECT Membership.member_id FROM memberships AS Membership)')

-2

COUNT(*) are optimized in MySQL, so the former query is likely to be faster, generally speaking.

  • 2
    Are you referring to the optimization that the MyISAM has for selecting the count for a whole table? I didn't think that helped if there was a WHERE condition. – Bernard Chen Nov 4 '09 at 21:14

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