33

If I use break like the code below, then the loop within row won't iterate the rest if there is a match in the beginning, but what about the col loop?

Would it still iterate between 0 and 7? Is there a way to use break there as well?

for (int col = 0; col < 8; col ++)
    for (int row = 0; row < 8; row ++)
        if (check something)
        {
            //Then do this;
            break;
        }
  • 2
    It won't break the outer loop, you would need to include a similar check there - maybe set a bool in the inner break. – Roger Rowland May 27 '13 at 9:12
  • 4
    Yes, it would continue to loop the outer loop. The way to break this is called goto. – JeffRSon May 27 '13 at 9:12
  • 1
    Set col to 8 would work – Sayse May 27 '13 at 9:14
  • 2
    @Sayse: unless he changes the limit of the loop ;) – Marco Forberg May 27 '13 at 10:30
  • 2
    Ah, breaking out of multiple loops.. the ultimate question. It seems so obvious but I wish there was some better language support rather than using a sentinel boolean. E.g. something like break(2) which breaks out twice. I mean, how hard can it be. – Thomas May 27 '13 at 11:05

13 Answers 13

88

One option is to use a condition flag. You could then either break in the outer loop as well, or just use it as an extra condition within the for loops:

bool keepGoing = true;

for (int col = 0; col < 8 && keepGoing; col++)
{
    for (int row = 0; row < 8 && keepGoing; row++)
    {
        if (something)
        {
             // Do whatever
             keepGoing = false;
        }
    }
}

In Java you can specify a label to break to though. (I didn't see that this question was tagged Java as well as C#.)

outerLoop:
for (...)
{
    for (...)
    {
        if (...)
        {
            break outerLoop;
        }
    }
}

EDIT: As noted in comments, in C# you could use a label and goto:

for (...)
{
    for (...)
    {
        if (...)
        {
            goto endOfLoop;
        }
    }
}
endOfLoop:
// Other code

I'd really recommend that you don't take either of these approaches though.

In both languages it would usually be best to simply turn both loops into a single method - then you can just return from the method:

public void doSomethingToFirstOccurrence()
{
    for (...)
    {
        for (...)
        {
            if (...)
            {
                return;
            }
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    @3D-kreativ Yes, you can. – Nolonar May 27 '13 at 9:17
  • 14
    @3D-kreativ: Yes, but I'd still recommend using the "extract to method" approach. – Jon Skeet May 27 '13 at 9:20
  • 4
    @3D-kreativ Yes, return exits the current method instantly. Except if you have a finally block, in which case the content of the finally block will be executed before exiting the current method, which is meant for closing open connections or disposing of objects or the likes. – Nolonar May 27 '13 at 9:47
  • 1
    Right, I would definitely agree that refactoring into a separate method is superior to either approach, I just thought it was odd that you didn't really warn against using break, but you did so somewhat emphatically for goto. – Peter Olson May 27 '13 at 21:38
  • 2
    @Gusdor: Readability is about much more than just line count. Often you can find a relatively long method can be broken into several short methods each of which tackles a single aspect, and one "coordinator" method which just calls each method in turn. While the code ends up being longer, it can be much quicker to read that way. – Jon Skeet May 28 '13 at 8:24
15

Yes, it is possible by using a break label:

package others;

public class A {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        outer: for(int col = 0; col < 8; col ++)
        {
            for (int row = 0; row < 8; row ++)
            {
                if (col == 4)
                {
                    System.out.println("hi");
                    break outer;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
5

You can put logic like this:

boolean condition = false;

for (int col = 0; col < 8; col ++)
    for (int row = 0; row < 8; row ++)
        if (check something) {
            // Then do this:
            condition = true; // Break condition for outer loop
            break;
        }
     }
     if (condition)
         break;
 }
3

break only breaks the loop that is directly around it. You could use a flag to control the outer loop:

boolean continueOuterLoop = true;

for(int col = 0; continueOuterLoop && col < 8; col ++) {
    for(int row = 0; row < 8; row ++) {
        if(check something) {
            //Then do this;
            continueOuterLoop = false;
            break;
        }
    }
}
  • This would be my preferred way (but you still need to break the inner loop). – Prince Goulash May 27 '13 at 11:10
  • @PrinceGoulash ty – Marco Forberg May 27 '13 at 11:26
3

It doesn't exit the col loop.

Instead, you can wrap all in a function and use return; to exit immediately from the loop

private Xy Loop( /* Parameters */)
    for (int col = 0; col < 8; col ++)
        for (int row = 0; row < 8; row ++)
            if (check something) {
                // Then do this;
                return something; //Or just return;
            }
        }
    }
}
  • This is more useful in a language like C where you can't break multiple loops. You can use goto, but generally people say goto is a no-no. – Ryan Amos May 28 '13 at 0:43
3
nameHere:
for (yourForLoop) {
    for (anotherLoop) {
        if(condition) {
            break nameHere;
        }
    }
}
1

In Java you can use a break label

outer: 
for (int col = 0; col < 8; col ++)
    for (int row = 0; row < 8; row ++)
        if (check something)
        {
            break outer;
        }
    }
}

And, since nobody else has mentioned it yet, in C# you can use goto label

for (int col = 0; col < 8; col ++)
    for (int row = 0; row < 8; row ++)
        if (check something)
        {
            goto outside;
        }
    }
}
outside:
1

I think you should use a tag or a label, like "outerLoop". This works in Java:

outerLoop:
    for (int col = 0; col < 8; col ++)
        for (int row = 0; row < 8; row ++)
            if (check something)
            {
                //Then do this;
                break outerLoop;
            }
1

One more alternative to the other answers is to set your counters to the maximum, to stop the loops.

for (int col = 0; col < 8; col ++)
    for (int row = 0; row < 8; row ++)
        if (check something)
        {
            // Use the col and row here.

            // Now we go for a totally break of all loops.
            // To stop the loops you can set that to the maximum
            // of your loop test.
            row = 8;
            col = 8;
        }

The advantage to that trick is that you do not add any additional checking code to the full loop and that makes it a lot faster.

0

There are a few ways to do this. One way is to set the max value of the variable in the outer loop.

int maxcol = 8;
for (int col = 0; col < maxcol; col++)
{
    for (int row = 0; row < 8; row++)
    {
        if (check something)
        {
            Then do this;

            // cause the outer loop to break:
            col = maxcol;
            // break the inner loop
            break;
        }
    }
}
0

Set the col = 8 and then break to inner loop.

  • Manipulating the for loop counters like this is not recommended. The counter should represent the number of iterations that have passed so if you set it to 8 when you haven't don't 8 iterations is a lie. You are also using the variable for more than one purpose. – Despertar May 27 '13 at 18:08
0
    Loop1: 
    for (int col = 0; col < 8; col ++)
    {
        for (int row = 0; row < 8; row ++)
        {
            if (condition)
            {
                break Loop1;
            }
        }
    }

This could do what you need...

-1

We could use the concept of a flag variable:

flag = 1;
for (int col = 0; col < 8; col ++)
{
    if (flag == 1)
    {
        for (int row = 0; row < 8; row ++)
        {
            if (flag == 1)
            {
                if (check something)
                {
                    //Then do this;
                    flag = 0;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
  • This will not work as intended. "if (flag = 1)" results in assignment of "flag" to 1 (and is always true) – Peter Mortensen Aug 21 '15 at 18:00

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