8

I have a MongoDB with a large "messages" collection; all messages belonging to a specific groupId. So have started with a publication like this:

Meteor.publish("messages", function(groupId) {
  return Messages.find({
    groupId: groupId
  });
});

and a subscription like this:

Deps.autorun(function() {
   return Meteor.subscribe("messages", Session.get("currentGroupId"));
});

This got me into trouble because initially currentGroupId is undefined but sill mongod would use up the CPU to find messages with groupId == null (although I know there are none).

Now, I tried to rewrite the publication as follows:

Meteor.publish("messages", function(groupId) {
  if (groupId) {
    return Messages.find({
      groupId: groupId
    });
  } else {
    return {}; // is this the way to return an empty publication!?
  }
});

and/or to rewrite the subscription to:

Deps.autorun(function() {
   if (Session.get("currentGroupId")) {
     return Meteor.subscribe("messages", Session.get("currentGroupId"));
   } else {
     // can I put a Meteor.unsubscribe("messages") here!?
   }
});

which both helps initially. But as soon as currentGroupId becomes undefined again (because the user navigates to a different page), mongod is still busy requerying the database for the last subscribed groupId. So how can I unsubscribe from a publication such that the mongod is stopped being queried?

4 Answers 4

9

According to the documentation it must be http://docs.meteor.com/#publish_stop

this.stop() Call inside the publish function. Stops this client's subscription; the onError callback is not invoked on the client.

So something like

Meteor.publish("messages", function(groupId) {
  if (groupId) {
    return Messages.find({
      groupId: groupId
    });
  } else {
    return this.stop();
  }
});

And I guess on the client side you can just remove your if/else like in your first example

Deps.autorun(function() {
   return Meteor.subscribe("messages", Session.get("currentGroupId"));
});
3
  • 2
    I guess you have a type here. Messages does not have a stop method. I guess it should say return this.stop(); instead.
    – Dejan
    May 28, 2013 at 12:51
  • 1
    I believe you are right, according to the doc the call stop() is a method of Meteor.publish, so I changed it to this.stop().
    – Michael
    May 28, 2013 at 22:34
  • Now, the funny thing is that omitting the call to stop() does not change the behavior. Have a look at my answer.
    – Dejan
    May 29, 2013 at 6:18
7

I found it more simple and straight-forward to call the .stop() function on the handler which is returned from the .subscribe() call:

let handler = Meteor.subscribe('items');
...
handler.stop();
5

Simply adding a condition to the publication:

Meteor.publish("messages", function(groupId) {
  if (groupId) {
    return Messages.find({
      groupId: groupId
    });
});

and keeping the subscription:

Deps.autorun(function() {
  return Meteor.subscribe("messages", Session.get("currentGroupId"));
});

does the job.

There is no need to stop the publication explicitly. Eventually, the MongoDB is not queried anymore after finishing the currently running query and issuing yet another one (which seems to be queued somewhere in the system).

1
  • Unfortunately, I didn't find any documentation to prove this claim. A hint would be very appreciated.
    – Dejan
    May 28, 2013 at 13:15
0

in your case, you should stop the autorun

there is an example in the documentation

Your autorun is actually called with a parameter that allows you to stop it:

Deps.autorun(function (c) {
  if (! Session.equals("shouldAlert", true))
    return;

  c.stop();
  alert("Oh no!");
});
1
  • Stopping the autorun won't help because I need to load (i.e. subscribe to) messages again once currentGroupId is not null anymore.
    – Dejan
    May 28, 2013 at 12:49

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