5

I feel like this is going to be a question to which the shortest answer will be : "that's why JSF replaced JSP", but I'll just go ahead and ask it.

Question : I am wondering : could I obtain the Response object of a JSF page (if there's any) ?

Why wonder ? : I found myself in a situation where I need to to pass from a JSF page to a JSP one, so I thought why not redirect (with response.sendRedirect) from a bean that gets invoked from the JSF page and then... you can see where it's heading.

I feel like this can be done in a cleaner way, can't see how though !

EDIT : while on it, I'll also ask about which way would be best for redirecting from to JSF pages.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions.

  • Not sure to understand the real problem, but I can suggest to use <h:outputLink> as shown here. – Luiggi Mendoza May 27 '13 at 16:48
  • Actually I meant the question to be of a general order, so anything about redirecting in JSF will do me good :) So outputLink replaces the <a> tag, now what about redirecting from inside a bean ? – Akheloes May 27 '13 at 16:56
  • You can obtain the response object in the managed bean by calling HttpServletResponse response = (HttpServletResponse)FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().getExternalContext().getResponse() (obtained from How to stream a file download in a JSF backing bean?) and then perform operations on the HttpServletResponse object. Obviously, there are things that you can't do like sending a redirect from an ajax request. – Luiggi Mendoza May 27 '13 at 17:04
  • Ok. This is weird, same answer from two guys in practically the same time... If you can post it as an answer it so I could at least be able to upvote it. – Akheloes May 27 '13 at 17:07
9

Well, if you want to get the response object, you can have it in JSF like bellow!

HttpServletResponse response = (HttpServletResponse) FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().getExternalContext().getResponse();

But you don't really need to get the response object only to redirect outside of JSF. This can be done more easily with the following:

ExternalContext externalContext = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().getExternalContext();
externalContext.redirect("http://www.example.com/myJspPage.jsp");

Edit:

When you are in any non-action method, you can use any of the above! But when you are in any action method, the proper JSF way of redirecting is:

public String goToOutsideAction(){
    ....
    return "/myPage.xhtml?faces-redirect=true"
}

The method should return a context-relative view ID and the target must be a JSF page.

  • Thanks, page.xhtml?faces-redirect=true works as well, which one is best ? – Akheloes May 27 '13 at 17:18
  • Yup! Ofcourse, return "url.com/page.jsp?faces-redirect=true" is the proper jsf way to handle redirect, for details you can see the answer of this question. – Sazzadur Rahaman May 27 '13 at 17:35
  • @Gloserio, I just edited my answer, and you can see now. – Sazzadur Rahaman May 27 '13 at 17:47
  • Right, thanks ! – Akheloes May 27 '13 at 19:09
  • 2
    @Gloserio nope, it will just generate a GET request on the JSP page. – Luiggi Mendoza May 27 '13 at 22:47
1

You can obtain the response object in the managed bean by calling

HttpServletResponse response = (HttpServletResponse)FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().getExternalContext().getResponse()

Code adapted from How to stream a file download in a JSF backing bean?)

Once you have the response object you can perform any operations on it like changing the headers. Obviously, there are things that you can't do like sending a redirect from an ajax request.

  • Thanks, would it be ok with you if I marked @Sarradur Rahaman 's answer as the accepted one ? It seems he was the first... – Akheloes May 27 '13 at 17:16
  • @Gloserio it's up to you. – Luiggi Mendoza May 27 '13 at 17:17
  • Oh man... Thanks for your help anyways :( – Akheloes May 27 '13 at 17:21

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