41

This question already has an answer here:

I have a set like (669256.02, 6117662.09, 669258.61, 6117664.39, 669258.05, 6117665.08) which I need to iterate over, like

    for x,y in (669256.02, 6117662.09, 669258.61, 6117664.39, 669258.05, 6117665.08)
        print (x,y)

which would print

    669256.02 6117662.09
    669258.61 6117664.39
    669258.05 6117665.08

im on Python 3.3 btw

marked as duplicate by Martijn Pieters, Aaron Digulla, Jon Clements, Inbar Rose, Volatility May 28 '13 at 10:37

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

61

You can use an iterator:

>>> lis = (669256.02, 6117662.09, 669258.61, 6117664.39, 669258.05, 6117665.08)
>>> it = iter(lis)
>>> for x in it:
...     print (x, next(it))
...     
669256.02 6117662.09
669258.61 6117664.39
669258.05 6117665.08
16
>>> nums = (669256.02, 6117662.09, 669258.61, 6117664.39, 669258.05, 6117665.08)
>>> for x, y in zip(*[iter(nums)]*2):
        print(x, y)


669256.02 6117662.09
669258.61 6117664.39
669258.05 6117665.08
  • 6
    Whoa. That's barely readable, consider it a hack. -1 for that. +1 for brevity, though. – Alfe May 28 '13 at 10:33
  • 8
    @Alfe read the official Python documentation please: docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#zip ... especially the part that say "This makes possible an idiom for clustering a data series into n-length groups using zip(*[iter(s)]*n)." – jamylak May 28 '13 at 10:34
  • 10
    After reading such a documentation I would have stated the same thing about the documentation. Whenever a hack is assumed feasible enough, it is called an idiom. But that does not make it readable ;-) – Alfe May 28 '13 at 10:36
  • 2
    @Alfe alright then, I agree with you, the python documentation is obviously wrong we should not listen to it – jamylak May 28 '13 at 10:38
  • 2
    There obviously never is just one way of seeing it. – Alfe May 28 '13 at 10:56
6

The grouper example in the itertools recipes section should help you here: http://docs.python.org/3.3/library/itertools.html#itertools-recipes

from itertools import zip_longest
def grouper(iterable, n, fillvalue=None):
    "Collect data into fixed-length chunks or blocks"
    # grouper('ABCDEFG', 3, 'x') --> ABC DEF Gxx"
    args = [iter(iterable)] * n
    return zip_longest(*args, fillvalue=fillvalue)

You would then use:

for x, y in grouper(my_set, 2, 0.0): ## Use 0.0 to pad with a float
    print(x, y)

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